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Adapting & Enhancing the Modules

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by

Laura Baye Broccoli

on 28 May 2014

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Transcript of Adapting & Enhancing the Modules

Work Experience
Photos
Interests
Status Update for ELA Modules
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We made Power Point presentations, tests, and worksheets for:
Module 1 books-
Rain School
,
That Book Woman
,
Nasreen's Secret School
,
Waiting for the Biblioburro
,
The Incrdeible Book Eating Boy
,
The Boy Who Loved Words
,
Thank You Mr. Falker
,
My Librarian is a Camel
, and
The Librarian of Basra
Module 2 books-
Bullfrog at Magnolia Cirle
,
Everything you Need to Know About Frogs
,
Poison Dart Frogs Up Close
,
Deadly Poison Dart Frogs
, and
Lizards, Frogs, and Polliwogs
,
Module 3-
Peter Pan
Module 4-

One Well: The Story of Water on Earth
and
All the Small Poems and 14 More
.

What we did for our
Professional Learning Community Project
was to perform a
"close read"
of the new
ELA & Math modules
. We highlighted
new vocabulary terms
to make study sheets for students. We also added in
Power Point presentations
to our module lessons for
visual learners
to follow along with. In addition, we worked to enhance the learning experiences of our students by filling in
technology
and
hard copies
of what would be typically only auditory prompts for students to follow.
Shared a Lesson for Math Modules
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We worked hard to incorporate the new module lessons but keep some of our old ones too like reading the trade book,

Stone Fox
,
watching the
movie in the theater
,
and

having the students
create their own 3-D dioramas
of their favorite scene
.
Our students also continued the 3rd grade tradition of

writing their own original stories
,
typing up their book
,
illustrating the pictures
,
and

shipping them off to be published
.
Still a Work In Progress...
Education
We educated ourselves in the new math language so that we could be proficient when teaching the students about
tape diagrams
,
place value disks
,
ten frames
,
tanagrams
, and much much more.
Whoooo's Who?
Mary Paul lives in... room C-8
Tammy Mickle lives in... room C-5
Sarah Hullar lives in... room C-3
Laura Broccoli lives in... room C-6
Shared a Photo of Math in Action!
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2013-2014 Third Grade Team P.L.C.
We made quizzes, tests, answer keys for homework and module assessments, Power Point Presentations, and worksheets for:

Module 1-
Properties of Multiplication & Division
Module 2-
Place Value, Problem Solving & Metric Measurement
Module 3-
Multiplication & Division 0, 1, 6-9, and 10's
Module 4-
Multiplication & Area
Module 5-
Fractions as Numbers on a Number Line
Module 6-
Collecting and Displaying Data
Module 7-
Geometry & Measurement Word Problems

Adapting & Enhancing the Modules
Fractions are in Module 5 and this is an extra activity we came up with to supplement the activities already outlined in the plan-Fraction Pizzas! We enjoyed having the parents of the students come help us out.



A Landform is a natural feature on the Earth’s surface


Some examples of landforms are:
Mountains
Hills
Forests
Valleys
Plains

Landforms


Physical Environment Includes:
Land
Temperature
Seasons
Precipitation – rain, snow

Read Together: Physical Environments Around the World



How did taking the perspective of one of the characters in That Book Woman change your understanding of the story?

Wrap Up

P. 12 – Book Woman, tell Cal what you think about your visit with his family.

P. 15 – Cal, tell the Book Woman how you feel about her visit.

P. 18 – Book Woman, tell Cal what it is like for you to get the books to him.

While We’re Reading…


I can make connections between the obstacles, or challenges, two characters face in a story.

Learning Target – That Book Woman

Environment – things around you, surroundings

The book woman had to overcome some environmental obstacles when she was delivering books.

*This means that there was something around the Book Woman (and her horse) that made her job hard.

Environmental Obstacles

An obstacle is a challenge.

An obstacle gets in the way of doing something.

Obstacles can be overcome, or dealt with.
There are personal and environmental obstacles.

Obstacle

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 1

What Makes It Hard for Some People to Get Books?

Desert – hot, dry area with little rain


Equator – imaginary line that separates the Northern and Southern Hemispheres


Climate is how hot or cold, wet or dry a place is

The Climate of New York State
Changes with each season
Hot summers
Cold, snow winters
Rainy spring



Climate



I can retell important ideas from the informational text Physical Environments Around the World.

Learning Target – Physical Environments Around the World

What made it challenging for the Book Woman to get to Cal and his family?

Land
Temperature
Seasons
Precipitation

What are other places in the world where it might be hard to get books to people?

Physical Environment

Keeping your character’s perspective…

Tell your partner the specific details in the illustration that show an obstacle, or challenge, you faced.

Illustrations



I can explain how the illustrations in That Book Woman help me understand the challenges faced by the characters.

Learning Target – That Book Woman

P. 24 – Cal, share your thoughts with the Book Woman. Then, ask her why she takes this risk.

P. 25 – Cal, tell the Book Woman how you felt when you were getting ready to ask your sister, and how you felt after you asked her.

P. 32 Book Woman – tell Cal how you felt after hearing him read.
Cal, tell the Book Woman how you felt when reading to her.

While We’re Reading…

P.1 – Cal, tell the Book Woman where you live.

P. 4 – Cal, tell the Book Woman about yourself and what you like to do.

P. 5 – Cal, tell the Book Woman how you feel when you see Lark reading.

P.7 – Cal, tell the Book Woman what you’re thinking.

Book Woman, tell Cal how you feel now that you’ve arrived at his house.

While We’re Reading…


Cal had to overcome some personal obstacles before he could learn to read.

*This means there was something going on inside his head that made the idea of reading books hard.

Personal Obstacles

This time, imagine you are Cal or The Book Woman.

Think about..
the obstacles, or challenges, that you face in this story.

how you overcome these obstacles.

Listen Again…

Obstacle Course

Arctic –cold, snowy, windy weather of the Arctic Circle


Why do you think Cal was thinking and feeling this way?

What do you notice about Cal compared to his sister?

Thinking About The Characters

That Book Woman
I can record key details from a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel into categories.

The third time you read this text you will be reading to find important details and to take notes on your graphic organizer.

Please complete the graphic organizer. *Make sure you use details from the text.

Second Learning Target –
Graphic Organizer

I can identify the main idea of a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel by using illustrations and reading the text closely.

Read the whole excerpt for “flow” – to enjoy and get a feeling of what it’s about.

Look closely at the photographs and captions.


First Learning Target

I can identify the main idea of a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel by using illustrations and reading the text closely.
I can record key details from a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel into categories.
I can answer questions using details from a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel.
I can discuss how the main idea in a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel is conveyed through key details.

Learning Targets

The expert will:
Tell about the geography of the country.
Tell about the book delivery programs of the country.

Then the expert and listeners will:
Discuss the two sentences below.
Each person will make a mini-book card for the country.
On the back (lined side):
I think the main idea is _____. I think this because _____.
On the front (blank side):
I think _______ is a reading superhero because _______.

Jigsaw Group Discussion: Part 1


I can discuss my opinion about a question with members of other groups.


I can give reasons to support my opinion.

Learning Targets

Why is it hard for people in the country you read about to access books?
Support your answer with evidence in the text.

Your jigsaw group you will be discussing the question:
In which country would it be hardest to access books?
You will have to express and support your opinion that your expert group country would be the hardest to access books.

Expert Groups – Prepare for Discussion

With your expert group, complete the main idea chart.

Remember to use details from the text in each section.

Complete the Chart


On the back (lined side) of your card:
Write the main idea sentence.
I think the main idea is ______________ because __________________________.

On the front (blank side) of your card:
Write Pakistan
Complete the sentence:
I think ______ is a reading superhero because _______.
Draw a picture about books being delivered in Pakistan if you have time.

Mini-Book - Pakistan

Write the gist on a post-it.

Remember:
Just focus on the words you do know
Don’t get stuck on names or places!

Think about WHO and WHAT HAPPENS.

After Reading Each Section

Complete the first section of the graphic organizer.

*What do you know about the main idea right now?

Write the “Gist”

Informational Text

Often divided into clear sections and paragraphs
*This makes finding the gist, or main idea easier!


Each section, or paragraph, has a topic sentence or a clear topic.


After reading each section, or paragraph, think about the gist, or main idea.

Let’s try it with the first paragraph!

What strategies did you use to read this informational text closely?

What was a success for you as a reader?

What was challenging?

Debrief

I can answer questions using details from a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel.

*Read the question first.
*Reread the text, highlighting evidence that would support your answer to each question.
*Write complete answers with text based details.
*Make sure you turn the question around and write in complete sentences.



Third Learning Target –
Text-Dependent Questions

I can identify the main idea of a new excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel by using illustrations and reading the text closely.

Read the first paragraph a second time.
Write the first gist.
Complete the first square on your graphic organizer.

Read the second and third paragraph again.
Write the gist for each paragraph.

First Learning Target - Gists

You will show me what you know about close reading of an informational text.

Remember:
You will have to read the text a few times to understand it better.
There will be words you don’t know.
* Focus on the words you do know!
Take your time
All I ask is that you DO YOUR BEST!

Today is the Day…

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 9

Answering Text-Dependent Questions About Librarians and Organizations Around the World

1. Each person will share the evidence they have to support their opinion that their group’s country would be the hardest to access books.

2. After listening to all of the experts, each student will make one last card for their mini-book.

On the lined side:
I think it is the hardest to access books in _____. I think this because __________________.

On the blank side: Draw a picture illustrating this.

Jigsaw Group Discussion: Part 2

On your own: Read and think about the questions.

As a group: Discuss the questions and answers.

On your own: Write your answer to the questions.
Remember to turn the question around to start your answer.
Check for complete sentences

Expert Groups- Text Questions

I can answer questions using details from My Librarian is a Camel.

Learning Target

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 8

Group Discussion: Accessing Books Around the World


How was close reading an informational text different from close reading narrative stories?

Wrap Up

Section 2 – Who is this passage about?

Section 5 – What else do you notice? (From illustrations, photographs and maps)

Section 6 – What do you think the main idea is now?

** Remember to use details from the text in your answer!

Complete the Main Idea Chart

This is an informational text, not a story.

How do you know this is not a story?
Think about what you see here that is not in a story.

Think about things in a story that are not in this text.

Preview Page 22

I can identify the main idea of a passage from My Librarian is a Camel by using illustrations and reading the text closely.


I can record key details from a passage from My Librarian is a Camel into categories.


I can discuss how the main idea in a passage from My Librarian is a Camel is conveyed through key details.

Learning Targets

On the back (lined side) of your card:
Write the main idea sentence.
Write 3 details you learned about how people get books in Peru
Write 2 facts about the physical environment in Peru
Write 1 question you still have about Peru

On the front (blank side) of your card:
Write Peru
Complete the sentence:
I think ______ is a reading superhero because _______.
Draw a picture about Peru if you have time.

Mini-Book - Peru


What physical features in this country make it difficult for people to access books?

How do people overcome these difficulties to access books?

After Reading Page 27

Complete on the organizer:

What do you know about the main idea right now?

Who is the passage about?

What else do you notice? Use details from illustrations, photographs, and maps.

After Reading Page 26

Since this is an informational text, the author wants to inform, or teach, you about a topic.

This book is all about how children around the world obtain, or get books.

Ideas

Read a section two times.

2. Talk with your group and write the gist of the section on a post-it.

Make a list of any words you do not know.

4. Repeat until you’ve read the whole thing.

Expert Group

You’ve listened to the first paragraph twice.

It’s ok if you don’t completely understand yet. *We have to read a hard text many times before really understanding it.

Think: What is this paragraph mostly about?

Don’t get stuck on words, names or places you don’t know.
*Focus on the words you do know and think about the WHO and WHAT.

Think About the Gist

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 7

Close Reading of Excerpts from My Librarian is a Camel: How Do People Access Books Around the World?

Look back at all of the interesting facts we have learned about Peru before completing this sentence:

I think the main idea is ____________________ because ___________________.

Thinking About the Main Idea Again

When authors write about a topic, they have a main idea they want to tell their reader.

It’s important to read carefully to learn what information the author wants to get across.

Let’s read and try to use evidence from the text and pictures to figure out the main idea.

Main Idea

What do you notice about the geography of Peru?

How do you think that might impact how children get books?

*Think about these things as we read today.*

Peru

First we are going to work with an excerpt, or a part of this book, about the country Peru.

Peru



What do you think is the main idea of this whole book?

After Reading the Introduction

This book is different because it is not a story (fiction) it is an informational text.


While we can get information from stories, this book written specifically to give us information on a topic.

Our Next Book is…..

I can determine the main idea of an excerpt from My Librarian is a Camel using evidence from the text and illustrations.

Learning Target

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 6

Determining the Main Idea Using Text and Illustrations:
Accessing Books Around the World

Over the next few days we are going to learn how books are brought to children in five different countries.

First you are going to become an “expert” about one country.

Then you are going to teach your classmates about your country.

Jigsaw Preparation

My Librarian is a Camel
Look at the Model Graphic Organizer for the paragraph we just read together.

Before you plan…

In the story That Book Woman, the Book Woman overcomes many obstacles to bring books to children. For example, she has to get past difficult physical obstacles. In the story, it says the family lives way up in the mountains. This would make it hard to reach them, so the Book Woman uses a horse. Also, she has to go through very bad weather. The story shows her coming to their house in rain, fog, snow, and cold. The bad weather would make it hard to reach the family. In That Book Woman, the Book Woman has to get past many obstacles to bring books to children.

In the story That Book Woman, the Book Woman overcomes many obstacles to bring books to children. For example, she has to get past difficult physical obstacles. In the story, it says the family lives way up in the mountains. This would make it hard to reach them, so the Book Woman uses a horse. Also, she has to go through very bad weather. The story shows her coming to their house in rain, fog, snow, and cold. The bad weather would make it hard to reach the family. In That Book Woman, the Book Woman has to get past many obstacles to bring books to children.

In the story That Book Woman, the Book Woman overcomes many obstacles to bring books to children. For example, she has to get past difficult physical obstacles. In the story, it says the family lives way up in the mountains. This would make it hard to reach them, so the Book Woman uses a horse. Also, she has to go through very bad weather. The story shows her coming to their house in rain, fog, snow, and cold. The bad weather would make it hard to reach the family. In That Book Woman, the Book Woman has to get past many obstacles to bring books to children.

Model Paragraph –
That Book Woman


Reread your “expert” book.


Complete the chart with 2 ways the books are similar and 2 ways they are different.
*You will need to support your answer with details from the text.


With Your Expert Group…

You will work with your group to become an expert on one of the books we have read this year: Rain School, Nasreen’s Secret School, or That Book Woman.

Once you are an “expert”, then you will share with your classmates that worked with a different book.

Jigsaw Activity



I can answer questions using specific details from the text.

Learning Target - Questions

I can describe what the librarian wanted and what he did.


I can sort key details from Waiting for the Biblioburro into categories.





I can discuss how the main message of Waiting for the Biblioburro is conveyed through key details.

Learning Targets

Listen to the Story

The next story we will be working with is called Waiting for the Biblioburro by Monica Brown.


This is a true story about a real person.


This type of story is called narrative nonfiction.
This means you will read to enjoy the story and to learn more about the topic.

Before We Listen

What did you do well with your paragraph?


What do you think you could change to make it better?

Reflection

Use your graphic organizer to help you.
Remember to use transition words and phrases.
For example, - Also,
In the story, - Another example
The author says, -The story says,
The illustrations show

Reread your writing when finished.
Check for complete sentences
Check the spelling of unknown words in a dictionary

Write your paragraph


I can write a topic sentence for a paragraph about the efforts the librarian made in order to get books to the people of Colombia.

I can support my topic with details.

I can write a sentence to close my paragraph.

Learning Targets - Writing

Write a sentence that states your topic.

Write 1 detail about your topic.

Support that detail with evidence from the story.

Write a second detail and evidence.

Write a conclusion that restates your topic sentence.

Complete Your Graphic Organizer

What are possible ideas for a paragraph about Waiting for the Biblioburro?

What should your topic be?

Adding Transition Words

Notice how the writer uses transition words at the beginning of sentences to make their writing smoother.

Look at the transition words and phrases the author used.

A New Skill….

How does the writer support the topic with details?

How does the writer explain the details with examples from the story?

What is the topic of this paragraph?

I can plan my paragraph using an Accordian graphic organizer.

Learning Target - Planning


What are some similarities we saw across all four books?


What does that tell us about the big lessons of our study?

Wrap Up

1. The Rain School expert will go first.
2. Explain the ways Rain School and Waiting for the Biblioburro are similar.
3. Give your group time to take notes, helping them as needed.

4. Explain the ways Rain School and Waiting for the Biblioburro are different.
5. Give your group time to take notes, helping them as needed.

6. Repeat with Nasreen and the Book Woman.

7. Discuss: In which setting is it hardest to access books? *Write your ideas on chart provided.

Working with your Jigsaw Group

Think About:
* What is the main character like?

*What does the main character want, and how do they get what they want?

*What is the physical environment of the setting?

* What is the problem? How is it solved?

While Completing the Chart

I can prepare for discussion by finding similarities and differences between Waiting for the Biblioburro and another text we have already read.

I can participate in a discussion with my peers to compare and contrast four stories on a similar topic.

Learning Targets –
Comparing and Contrasting

Take your time writing complete answers to each question.

Make sure you:
Use the words from the question to begin your answer.
Use the evidence you highlighted in your answer.
Write in complete sentences.

Write Complete Answers

Begin rereading Waiting for the Biblioburro looking for evidence to answer each question.

When you found evidence, highlight the details and write the number of the question next to it.

You do not have to write any answers yet!!!

Highlight the Evidence

This time you are going to be working to answer questions that can only be found inside the text.

First you will find the evidence.

Then you will write your answer.

Reading Waiting for the Biblioburro Again…

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 4

Close Reading of
Waiting for the Biblioburro:
Comparing and Contrasting Children in Colombia, Appalachia, Chad and Afghanistan

What was a success for you as a reader today?

What was challenging for you?

What strategies did you use to help you understand the story?

Reflection

You will reread excerpts (parts of the text) from Waiting for the Biblioburro on your own.

*Focus on the words you know and try to figure out what each character is doing and what is happening in the story.

After reading you will:

Write the gist of each excerpt on the side.

Second Rereading –
Capture the Gist

I can identify the main message of Waiting for the Biblioburro by reading the text closely.

I can describe what the librarian wanted and what he did.

I can sort key details from Waiting for the Biblioburro into categories.

I can discuss how the main message of Waiting for the Biblioburro is conveyed through key details.

Learning Targets

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 3

Close Reading of Waiting for the Biblioburro: Finding the Main Message and Taking Notes

Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 5

Paragraph Writing About
Waiting for the Biblioburro

What do you think was the most important detail in Waiting for the Biblioburro that showed the lesson of the story?



Wrap Up

Reread each excerpt with your partner.

Complete the Somebody In Wanted But So graphic organizer.

Discuss what you think the lesson of the story is.

Somebody In Wanted But So (SIWBS)



I can identify the main message of Waiting for the Biblioburro by reading the text closely.


Learning Targets


Circle any words you do not know.

Look for and underlilne clues around the word to determine what it means.

Write a new word above the circled word.

First Rereading –
Figure Out Unknown Words

Waiting for the Biblioburro
Thank You Mr. Falker
The Boy Who Loved Words
Frog Unit
Complete the scavenger hunt organizer with your partner.

Take turns reading each section.

Look at the details in the photograph carefully.

Write what you learned from the text feature on your chart.

Discuss with your partner:
What adaptations help the glass frog survive?

Your Turn

How is this text the same as or different from the life cycle text?

Listen and follow along to the text “Super Skin”.

For each step in the skin sheding process, think about the gist of the paragraph.

Listen and Follow Along

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 10

Comparing and Contrasting Two Texts About Poison Dart Frogs: Poison!

Think:

What adaptations help the Amazon horned frog survive?

Answer:

An Amazon horned frog has/does _________, which helps them survive by _____________.

Wrap Up

Part 2 – Questions about the Amazon horned Frog
Write complete answers to each question.
Be sure to turn the question around when writing your answer.
Highlight the evidence in the text and use it in your answer.

Look back at the two questions you wrote in the chart at the beginning of the lesson.
If you found the answer, write it on your chart.

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

Vocabulary Notebook

Work in your vocabulary notebook with the following words:

carnivore
ambush
predatory
gape

Freaky Frog Vocabulary

Complete the scavenger hunt organizer with your partner.

Take turns reading each section.

Look at the details in the photograph carefully.

Write what you learned from the text feature on your chart.

Discuss with your partner:
What adaptations help the Amazon horned frog survive?

Your Turn

Follow along as I read the first section – Enormous Gape

What information did you learn from this section?

Record what you learned in the middle section of your organizer.

Let’s Begin Together

We are going to work with a graphic organizer to help us pay attention to each one of the text features on this page.

By making sure we look at each text feature closely, we will be able to become experts about Amazon horned frogs.

Water-Holding Frog Scavenger Hunt

Let’s preview pages 20 and 21 about the Amazon horned frog.

Based on what you notice from the pictures on these pages, what do you wonder?

Write two questions on your chart.

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

I can ask questions about Amazon horned frogs from the text.
I can answer questions about Amazon horned frogs.
I can determine the meaning of words from the text.
I can use text features to find information efficiently about Amazon horned frogs.
I can use information from illustrations to understand about Amazon horned frogs.
I can use information from the words to understand about Amazon horned frogs.

Learning Targets

Today we are going to learn about the last of three “freaky frogs” by reading a section of Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.


What do you think a “freaky frog” is?


What adaptations might a “freaky frog” have?

Freaky Frogs

After reading Douglas Florian’s poem “The Poison-Dart Frog” a few times, think about the following questions:


What color are poison-dart frogs?
What evidence from the text helps you know this?

What do you think Douglas Florian means when he writes “their poison can tip a dart.”

Starting with a Poem

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 9

Reading About Freaky Frogs: “The Amazon Horned Frog”

Think:

What adaptations help the water-holding frog survive?

Answer:

A water-holding frog has/does _________, which helps them survive by _____________.

Wrap Up

Part 2 – Questions about the Water-Holding Frog
Write complete answers to each question.
Be sure to turn the question around when writing your answer.
Highlight the evidence in the text and use it in your answer.

Look back at the two questions you wrote in the chart at the beginning of the lesson.
If you found the answer, write it on your chart.

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

Vocabulary Notebook

Work in your vocabulary notebook with the following words:

widespread
burrow
bloated
estivation

Freaky Frog Vocabulary

Complete the scavenger hunt organizer with your partner.

Take turns reading each section.

Look at the details in the photograph carefully.

Write what you learned from the text feature on your chart.

Discuss with your partner:
What adaptations help the water-holding frog survive?

Your Turn

Follow along as I read the first paragraph – Where does it LIVE?


Now, look at the map on the bottom of page 36. What information did you learn from the map? How does it help you understand the paragraph?


Record what you learned in the top section of your organizer.

Let’s Begin Together

We are going to work with a graphic organizer to help us pay attention to each one of the text features on this page.

By making sure we look at each text feature closely, we will be able to become experts about water-holding frogs.

Water-Holding Frog Scavenger Hunt

Let’s preview pages 36 and 37 about the water-holding frog.

Based on what you notice from the pictures on these pages, what do you wonder?

Write two questions on your chart.

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

I can ask questions about water-holding frogs from the text.
I can answer questions about water-holding frogs.
I can determine the meaning of words from the text.
I can use text features to find information efficiently about water-holding frogs.
I can use information from illustrations to understand about water-holding frogs.
I can use information from the words to understand about water-holding frogs.

Learning Targets

Today we are going to learn about the second of three “freaky frogs” by reading a section of Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.


What do you think a “freaky frog” is?


What adaptations might a “freaky frog” have?

Freaky Frogs

After reading Douglas Florian’s poem “The Red-Eyed Tree Frog” a few times, think about the following question:


What are some vivid and precise words Douglas Florian uses to describe the physical characteristics of the red-eyed tree frog?

Starting with a Poem

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 8

Reading About Freaky Frogs: “The Water-Holding Frog”

Think:

What adaptations help the glass frog survive?

Answer:

A glass frog has/does _________, which helps them survive by __________________.

Wrap Up

Part 2 – Questions about the Glass Frog
Write complete answers to each question.
Be sure to turn the question around when writing your answer.
Highlight the evidence in the text and use it in your answer.

Look back at the two questions you wrote in the chart at the beginning of the lesson.
If you found the answer, write it on your chart.

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

Vocabulary Notebook

Work in your vocabulary notebook with the following words:

hatch
transparent
rainforest canopy
blends

Freaky Frog Vocabulary

Look at the top picture and caption on page 33.
What details do you see in the picture?

What new information did you learn from reading the caption?

Record what you learned in the top section of your organizer.

Let’s Begin Together

Today we are going to work with a new organizer to help us pay attention to each one of the text features on this page.

By making sure we look at each text feature closely, we will be able to become experts about glass frogs.

Glass Frog Scavenger Hunt

Let’s preview pages 32 and 33 about the glass frog.

Based on what you notice from the pictures on these pages, what do you wonder?

Write two questions on your chart.

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

I can ask questions about glass frogs from the text.
I can answer questions about glass frogs.
I can determine the meaning of words from the text.
I can use text features to find information efficiently about glass frogs.
I can use information from illustrations to understand about glass frogs.
I can use information from the words to understand about glass frogs.

Learning Targets

Today we are going to learn about the first of three “freaky frogs” by reading a section of Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.


What do you think a “freaky frog” is?


What adaptations might a “freaky frog” have?

Freaky Frogs

After reading Douglas Florian’s poem “The Glass Frog” a few times, think about the following questions:

What is the glass frog’s habitat?
What evidence from the text helps you know this?
What is Douglas Florian trying to teach us about glass frogs when he writes:
“It’s hard to see
Which part is leaf
And which part is me?”

Starting with a Poem

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 7

Reading About Freaky Frogs: “The Glass Frog”

Complete the graphic organizer about 4 frogs.

Answer the three questions about the frogs.

Look back at your questions. Answer any that you can.

Complete your vocabulary notebook including words from this section that are important to understanding more about frogs.

Finish Up Work Period


What frog do you think is the most amazing?

Review

Now that you’ve learned more about the life cycle of a frog, did you find the answers to any of your questions? If yes, write them on your recording form.

Write complete answers to the questions. When required to include details, make sure you highlight and include evidence to support your answer!

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

Compare your notebook with a partner.

Did you write the same words? If yes, compare your definitions. Put a checkmark if you agree.

If you wrote different words, do you agree with your partner’s definition?

Compare Your Notebook

Vocabulary Notebook

Today we are going to add words to our notebook to keep building “word power.”
These words will help you be better readers and writers.

The words you will write today are not in the glossary. You will have to use context and picture clues to figure out the words.

Vocabulary Notebook

With your partner:

Take turns rereading about the habitat of four different frogs.

For each frog:
Tell where the frog lives
Describe why the frog can survive there. Describe the amazing adaptation.
*Remember, include only the most important information!!

Gist and Organizer

How is this text the same as or different from the other two texts we’ve read from this book?

Listen and follow along to the text “Home Sweet Home.”

Think about the gist of each habitat.

Listen and Follow Along

Look closely at the pictures on pages 18 and 19.


Discuss: What do you wonder about these pictures?


Write your questions on your recording form.

Before We Read…

I can ask and answer questions about frog’s habitat in Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.


I can describe an adaptation that helps a frog survive in a particular habitat.


I can determine the meaning of unknown words using context clues.

Learning Targets

Now that you’ve learned more about the life cycle of a frog, did you find the answers to any of your questions? If yes, write them on your recording form.

Write complete answers to the questions. When required to include details, make sure you highlight and include evidence to support your answer!

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

Compare your notebook with a partner.

Did you write the same words? If yes, compare your definitions. Put a checkmark if you agree.

If you wrote different words, do you agree with your partner’s definition?

Compare Your Notebook

Vocabulary Notebook

Today we are going to add words to our notebook to keep building “word power.”
These words will help you be better readers and writers.

The words you will write today are not in the glossary. You will have to use context and picture clues to figure out the words.

Vocabulary Notebook

With your partner:

Take turns rereading the four steps of how a frog sheds its skin.

Write the gist of each stage on your organizer.
*Remember, include only the most important information!!

Gist and Organizer

Look closely at the pictures on pages 12 and 13.


Discuss: What do you wonder about these pictures?


Write your questions on your recording form.

Before We Read…


I can ask and answer questions about frog’s skin in Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.


I can describe how frogs shed their skin.


I can determine the meaning of unknown words using context clues.

Learning Targets

Now that you’ve learned more about the life cycle of a frog, did you find the answers to any of your questions? If yes, write them on your recording form.

Write complete answers to the questions. When required to include details, make sure you highlight and include evidence to support your answer!

Asking and Answering Questions Recording Form

Vocabulary Notebook

Today we are going to add words to our notebook to keep building “word power.”
These words will help you be better readers and writers.

The words you will write today are not in the glossary. You will have to use context and picture clues to figure out the words.

Vocabulary Notebook

With your partner:

Take turns rereading each stage.

Write the gist of each stage on your organizer.
*Remember, include only the most important information!! (I know, there are a lot of cool, interesting details!)

Gist and Organizer

Listen and follow along to each stage in the life cycle of a frog.

For each stage, think about the gist of the paragraph.

Listen and Follow Along

Look closely at the pictures on pages 14 and 15.


Discuss: What do you wonder about these pictures?


Write your questions on your recording form.

Before We Read…

What do you already know about the life cycle of a frog?

What do you know?


I can ask and answer questions about the life cycle of a frog.

I can describe the life cycle of a frog.

I can determine the meaning of unknown words using context clues.

Learning Targets


3 interesting facts I learned from text features

2 text features I learned more about today

1 new vocabulary words I learned more about today

Wrap Up – Exit Ticket

Intro to Vocabulary Notebooks

As we read throughout this unit, we will use a vocabulary notebook to help us remember important words about frogs.

Let’s begin our notebook with words from the “Staying Alive: Animal Adaptations” text.

Intro to Vocabulary Notebooks

With your partner/group you will:

Find the text features.

Use the text feature to read closely.

Track new information on the recording form.

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt

Table of Contents

.
Glossary


Index



More Text Features

Text Feature Scavenger Hunt Example

Take a look at pages 6 and 7.


What are some text features you see on this page?


When I see __________, I learn __________.

Let’s Use Informational Text Features

What is an informational text feature?


Informational text features help readers find important information quickly.



Using Informational Text Features

I can use text features to efficiently find information in the text Everything You Need to Know About Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.


I can determine the meaning of key words about freaky frogs.

Learning Targets

Flip through the pages of Everything You Need to Know About Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures.


Be prepared to share one interesting photograph or idea you read in the text preview.

Exploring the Text

Think about what you already know about bullfrogs.

What is an example of a physical adaptation of a bullfrog?

What is an example of a behavioral adaptation of a bullfrog?

Wrap Up

Main Idea

Think about the bold vocabulary words in each section.


Details

What key details support the main idea?

Complete the Graphic Organizer

Have one person read one paragraph.

Discuss any words you circled.

Discuss the gist of the paragraph – what is it mostly about

Highlight the most important words in the paragraph.
Remember: You shouldn’t highlight too much!

Reread with your Group

Please listen and follow along to “Staying Alive: Animal Adaptations”


Circle any unknown words as you listen.

*If you can’t tell me what it means….circle it!

Listen and Follow Along

I can identify the main idea of “Staying Alive: Animal Adaptations” by reading the text closely.

I can list key details in the text that support the main idea.

I can describe the different kinds of animal adaptations.

Learning Targets

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 1

Reading Closely to Expand Understanding of Adaptations

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 5

Asking and Answering Questions: Reading About A Frog’s Habitat


What amazed you today about a frog’s skin?

Review


What was the most interesting thing you learned today about the frog’s life cycle?

Review

Compare your notebook with a partner.

Did you write the same words? If yes, compare your definitions. Put a checkmark if you agree.

If you wrote different words, do you agree with your partner’s definition?

Compare Your Notebook

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 3

Asking and Answering Questions: Studying the Life Cycle of a Frog

Informational Text Features Include:
Photograph
Close-Up
Caption
Bold Words
Index
Glossary
Table of Contents
Sub Headings



Using Informational Text Features

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 2

Using Informational Text Features and Learning Freaky Frog Vocabulary

In this unit we will work with the book Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures to learn about other types of frogs.

Preview page 30-31
*What do you see that’s interesting in these photos?
*What does it make you wonder about?

Unit Preview

Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 4

Asking and Answering Questions: Studying the Skin of a Frog

Taking Note: Getting Lost in Neverland
With your partner, take about 4 minutes at each image.

Study the images thinking about the quote we just read together.

Look for any details in the image that match up with details the you read in the quote.

Talk with your partner about what you notice.

Listen for words and phrases that help you imagine.

What does your Neverland look like?

Be very descriptive!

Is it in color?
Black and White?
Happy? Scary?
Lagoons? Flamingos?
Wolves?

Exit Ticket

Which quote most captured your imagination and why?

How do writers capture a reader’s imagination?

Quotes About Neverland

“Every child’s Neverland is slightly different. Some are in color others are in black and white. Some have ragged coral reefs with tiny smashed-up boats, lonely caves, and tiny huts on the beach.” (page 5)

“He gestured in the direction the sun was shining, like a hundred golden arrows pointing to the island.” (page 37)

“Shortly, however, the sun went down and the children got scared… Down below, black shadows grew and strange noises could be heard.” (page38)

“The fairies slept late. The wild animals nursed their babies. The pirates and lost boys and the Indians stopped fighting wars.”

Read the quote once out loud just to hear it and get the flow of it.
Read the quote again, thinking, “What words or phrases really jumped out, painted a picture in my mind, and captured my imagination?
With your partner, discuss which words or phrases you noticed.
Record those words or phrases on your recording form.
Read the quote out loud one last time, thinking: “How do these words or phrases help you picture Neverland?”
With your partner, discuss your thinking about this question.
Write your answer on the recording form.
Repeat for each quote.

Quotes About Neverland

Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Peter Pan

3rd Grade ELA Common Core
NYS Module 3A
Unit 2: Lesson 1

Created by
Common Core With Style


Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Getting Lost in
Neverland

Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Getting Lost in
Neverland

I can answer questions using details from quotes from Peter Pan.

I can take notes into categories while studying images of Neverland.

Based on these learning targets what do you think we will be doing today?

I’m Unpacking the Learning Targets!

Peter Pan
Not being able to pay attention for very long, or have you attention easily caught by other things.


Distracted

Having to do with motherhood or being a mother


Maternal


Behaving badly or mischievously



Naughty


To take offense, or get upset at something


Huffed


In a soothing kind of way.


Soothingly


Clean, neat


Tidy

PETER PAN
BONUS
Character Match

Cards for the game in Unit 1 Lesson 9
Print a set out for each group and fold them in half, laminate and use every year!

Peter Pan
BONUS
3rd Grade ELA Common Core
NYS Module 1
Unit 1: Lesson 9
Created by
Common Core With Style


To come to an agreement


Compromised


To be upset or to be irritated


Annoyed


Clever, smart, tricky


Sly

To feel pleased or gratified by something or someone


Flattered


To do something you are asked to.


Cooperating


Wanting what other people have


Jealous

Matching Game
Taking Note: Getting Lost in Neverland
With your partner, take about 4 minutes at each image.

Study the images thinking about the quote we just read together.

Look for any details in the image that match up with details the you read in the quote.

Talk with your partner about what you notice.

Listen for words and phrases that help you imagine.

Which quote most captured your imagination and why?

How do writers capture a reader’s imagination?

Quotes About Neverland

“Every child’s Neverland is slightly different. Some are in color others are in black and white. Some have ragged coral reefs with tiny smashed-up boats, lonely caves, and tiny huts on the beach.” (page 5)

“He gestured in the direction the sun was shining, like a hundred golden arrows pointing to the island.” (page 37)

“Shortly, however, the sun went down and the children got scared… Down below, black shadows grew and strange noises could be heard.” (page38)

“The fairies slept late. The wild animals nursed their babies. The pirates and lost boys and the Indians stopped fighting wars.”

Read the quote once out loud just to hear it and get the flow of it.
Read the quote again, thinking, “What words or phrases really jumped out, painted a picture in my mind, and captured my imagination?
With your partner, discuss which words or phrases you noticed.
Record those words or phrases on your recording form.
Read the quote out loud one last time, thinking: “How do these words or phrases help you picture Neverland?”
With your partner, discuss your thinking about this question.
Write your answer on the recording form.
Repeat for each quote.

Quotes About Neverland

Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Getting Lost in
Neverland

Peter Pan

3rd Grade ELA Common Core
NYS Module 3A
Unit 2: Lesson 1

Created by
Common Core With Style


Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Details from the Text

Details from the Image

Getting Lost in
Neverland

What does your Neverland look like?

Be very descriptive!

Is it in color?
Black and White?
Happy? Scary?
Lagoons? Flamingos?
Wolves?

Exit Ticket

I can answer questions using details from quotes from Peter Pan.

I can take notes into categories while studying images of Neverland.

Based on these learning targets what do you think we will be doing today?

I’m Unpacking the Learning Targets!
Full transcript