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Stylistically Marked and Stylistically Neutral Words

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on 16 September 2015

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Transcript of Stylistically Marked and Stylistically Neutral Words

Plan
1. The basic stylistic division
2. Stylistically marked and stylistically neutral
words
3. Examples
The majority of words of the English language possesses
denotative
information only.
Literary
vocabulary includes bookish words, terms, poetic and archaic words, barbarisms and neologisms.
Colloquial
vocabulary embraces conversational lexis, jargonisms, professionalisms, dialectal, slangy and vulgar words.
Neutral words, which form the bulk of the English vocabulary, are used in both literary and colloquial language. Neutral words are the main source of synonymy and polysemy.
Beans, jolly, brass
MONEY
The opposition of stylistically marked and stylistically neutral words
Words
stylistically
neutral
literary
colloquial
Go ahead
Start
Commence
"Jem said, “He goes out, all right, when it’s pitch dark. Miss Stephanie Crawford said she woke up in the middle of the night one time and saw him looking straight through the window at her… said his head was like a skull lookin‘ at her. Ain’t you ever waked up at night and heard him, Dill? Why do you think Miss Rachel locks up so tight at night? I’ve seen his tracks in our back yard many a mornin’, and one night I heard him scratching on the back screen, but he was gone time Atticus got there.”
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0
1
slang, argot,
dialectal, familiar
and vulgar words
Anglo-Saxon
Latin, French
Full transcript