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Golden Arches Theory

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Emily Krohn

on 7 June 2011

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Transcript of Golden Arches Theory

Thomas Friedman
&
The Golden Arches Theory Biography Friedman grew up in Minnesota and attended the University of Minnesota, Brandeis University, and Oxford University

He obtained a major in Mediterranean Studies
and Middle Eastern Studies

Joined the New York Times in 1981 and won 3 Pultizer Prizes

Worth approximately $25 million USD Golden Arches Theory In his book "Lexus and the Olive Tree," he theorized that no two counties that contained a McDonald's frachise had ever gone to war with one another.

This was a branch off of the Democratic Peace Thoery, which states that no two countires with a democracy will go to war with one another. The rationale?

Friedman believes that when a country reaches an economic development when it can have a middle class strong enought to support a McDonald's franchise, it won't want to fight another country. So McDonald's might not be getting rid of obesity, but apparently it's preventing war! HOW? BUT WAIT! NATO bombed Seria in 1973, which disproved Friedman's theory. However, he was quick to explain this. He said that the war ended quickly because the Servian population didn't want to lose their place in a global system symoblized by McDonald's.

Other exceptions included the war between Israel and Lebanon in 2006 and the 2008 war between Georgia and Russia Dell Theory of Conflict Prevention

Since his Golden Arches Theory of Conflict Prevention was proven wrong on these various occasions, he developed a new one.

In his new book "The World Is Flat" he stated that "no two countries that are both part of a major blobal supply chain, like 'Dell,' will never fight a war against each other as long as they are both part of the same global supply chain."

Who would have guessed that the prescence of McDonald's and big corporations can prevent wars? The rationale? He now claims that due to economic interdependence between nations that occurs becaue a large corporation has supply chain operations in multiple global locations and reluctance of newly developed countires in giving up their newfound wealth

However, Friedman says that this doesn't mean the coutires won't fight, it just means that the governments of these nations and their citizens will have very economic costs to consider as the contemplate the possibility of war. Examples:
India and Pakistan from 2001-2002, they had a nuclear standoff, but no action was taken becaue India was at risk of losing its global partners.

China and Taiwan were close to war but both have strong supply relations with each other, so a war is not likely. Criticisms:

Some accuse Friedman of an Isreael bias, pro-war and pro-US violence in the world.

He advocates for green energy AND coal mining, and his huge mansion isn't exactly eco-friendly. Interesting Facts:

His wife, Anne Bucksbaum, came from a very wealthy family. Her father was chairman of the board of a real estate development group, and the family's assets in 2007 were worth $4.1 billion, but in 2009 they filed for bankrupcy. It was the largest real estate bankruptcy in US history

When Friedman was younger, he wished to be a professional golfer.
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