Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Fetal Circultion

No description
by

Emily Sisson

on 16 January 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Fetal Circultion

Fetal Circulation
Adult Circulation
Deoxygenated blood travels from the body through the inferiour and superiour vena cava
To the right atrium, through the tricuspid valve, and to the right ventricle
Then goes through the pulmonary semilunar vale to the left and right pulmonary arteries and to the lungs
Oxygenated blood from the lungs goes through the left and right pulmonary vein

to the left atrium
Then travels through the bicuspid valve to the left ventricle
Next through the aortic semilunar vale through the aorta and to the rest of the body
Work Cited
(www.colourbox.com/preview/5526819-33219-blood-flow-through-the-heart.jpg)
Fetal Circulation
Before birth the lungs are not functioning, and the blood is oxygenated at the placenta, travels through the umbilical cord, umbilicus and to the umbilical vein.
The first shunt is the
ductus venosus
which bypasses the liver and allows the oxygenated blood to flow from the umbilical vein through the inferior vena cava and to the right atrium.
At the right atrium there is a mixing of oxygenated blood from the mom and deoxygenated blood from the fetus.
The second shunt is the
foramen ovale
which allows most of the

blood to move from the right atrium to the left atrium and bypass the right ventricle.
The blood moves from the left atrium to the left ventricle, then to the aorta and to the rest of the fetus's body.
Some blood does travel from the right atrium to the right ventricle, and then to the pulminary trunk where in postnatal circulation the blood would all go to the lungs but in fetal circulation only a small amount of blood goes to the lungs to keep the tissue alive and the rest goes through the
ductus arteriosus,
a shunt that allows most of the blood to go to the aorta and to the rest of the fetus.
After the blood circulates through the fetus it goes through the umbilical arteries, the umbilical cord, and back to the placenta to be reoxygenated.
Major Differences
Oxygen exchange occurs at the placenta rather than the lungs
The right and left side of the heart have a mixing of deoxygenated and oxygenated blood
Pressure is higher on the right side of the heart
Shunts and Fetal Bypasses:
Foramen Ovale
Ductus Arteriosus
Ductus Venous
(http://www.yorksandhumberhearts.nhs.uk/upload/Fetal%20Webpages/Images/Picture1.jpg)
(http://faculty.spokanefalls.edu/InetShare/AutoWebs/GaryB/AP%20243/Unit%203?Human%20Fetal%20Circulation-Lymphatic%20System_files/slide0005_image005.jpg)
Switching from Fetal Circulation to Postnatal Circulation
It takes between about 4 to 12 hours after the baby is born to switch over from fetal circulation to postnatal circulation.
During this time the umbilical vein changes to the ligamentum teres and the umbilical arteries change into medial umbilical ligaments this is caused by spontanious constriction.
The ductus arteriosus constricts and changes into the ligamentum arteriosum.
The ductus venous also constricts causing it to become the ligamentum venosum.
Increased pressure on the left side of the heart and decreased presure on the right side of the heart cause the foramen ovale to close and become the fossa ovalis.
(http://www.bioalogy.com/images/cardio1jpg)
Fossa Ovalis (Foramen Ovale)
Ligamentum Arteriosum (Ductus Arteriosum)
Ligamentum Teres (Umbilical Vein)
Medial Umbilical Ligaments (Umbilical Arteries)
Ligamentum Venosum
(Ductus Venosus)
Congenital Heart Defects
About 8 out of 1000 newborns babies have a congenital heart defect.
About 60 years ago less than 20% of babies born with heart defects would live to adulthood.
Today over 90% of babies born with heart defects live to reach adulthood.
Many heart defects are not diagnosed until childhood or older.
Symptoms:
Rapid Breathing
Cyanosis (bluish skin, lips, and fingernails)
Fatigue
Poor Blood Circulation
Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA)
Patent Ductus Arteriosus is a heart defect where the ductus arteriosus does not constrict or close after the switch from fetal circulation to postnatal circulation.
This causes blood flow to go back into the pulminary trunk from the aorta.
PDA can cause heart failure, or an infection of the heart.
In infants the ductus arteriosus can be closed with the use of medication.
In older children or adults surgery will be needed to close the ductus arteriosus.
(http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/images/patent_ductus.jpg)
(http://www.heartpoint.com/images/congenital/pda.gif)
Atrial Septal Defects (ASD)
Atrial setal defects occur when the foramen ovale fails to close after the switch from fetal circulation to postnatal circulation.
This causes a mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood.
This occurs because of the pressure from the right side of the heart not switching over properly to the left side of the heart and fails to close the foramen ovale properly.
This can cause heart failure, and high blood pressure in the lungs.
This often needs to be treated by surgery.
(http://www.chd-uk.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/atrialseptaldefect2.jpeg)
(http://www.heartpoint.com/images/conqenital/atd.gif)
"Adult and Fetal Circulation." MacAntonamy. MacMaster Health Sciences, 2009. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)." Chd-uk.co.uk. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)." Definition. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.
"Blood Flow Though the Heart." Colourbox.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Congenital Heart Defects: MedlinePlus." U.S National Library of Medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Congenital Image." Heartpoint.com. HeartPoint, 1997. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Congenital Image." Heartpoint.com. HeartPoint, 1997. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Diseases and Conditions." Slide Show: Common Types of Congenital Heart Defects. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Fetal Circulation Image." Yalemedicalgroup.org. Yale Medical Group, n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Fetal Circulation System." Fetal Circulation System. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Fetal Image." Yorksandhumberhearts.nhs.uk. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Fetal Image." Yorksandhumberhearts.nhs.uk. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Health Topics Patent Ductus." Nhlbi.nih.gov. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Heart Disease - Congenital Heart Disease-Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada." Heartandstroke.ca. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.
"Human Fetal Circulation." Faculty.spokanefalls.edu. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014
option=com_content&view=section&layout=blog&id=23&Itemid=172>.
"KidsHealth." Congenital Heart Defects. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
"Preview." Wallpaperhere.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Vayer, Ilana, Ms. "Cardio Vascular Development." Lecture. Course Lectures Online. MacMaster University, Hamilton. Dec. 2013. Web. 15 Dec. 2014. <http://macanatomy.mcmaster.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&layout=blog&id=23&Itemid=172>.
Full transcript