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What teachers can learn from Video Games

More @ http://goo.gl/yN9qw. How do games motivate, teach, and engage players? How can teachers use these strategies to engage students? This presentation features video of students and game designers exploring principles of game design and education.
by

Ryan McCallum

on 18 April 2012

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Transcript of What teachers can learn from Video Games

What can teachers learn from video games?
Ryan McCallum
The Players
Isaiah
Dylan
Avery
Sarah
Assessment
& Motivation

Story
& Narrative

Experiential Learning
Failure
Recovery

Mike
Brad
Nate & Jason
Tyler
Kaelie
Critical Learning
Contextual Learning
Embodied Learning
97%
of American children
from ages 12-17 play
video games.
99% of boys
95% of girls
65%
played
"yesterday"
Pew Internet and American Life Survey, 2010.
Literacy
When people learn to
play games, they are
learning a new literacy.
Images
Graphs
Symbols
Sound
Artifacts
Bodily Sensation
Movement
Music
Diagrams
Texts
Projected Identities
"How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living?"
-Thoreau
Story &
Narrative
Assessment
& Motivation
Failure
Recovery
Literacy
Experiental
Learning
Collaboration
as Amplification
Difficulty
& Regime
of Confidence
Identity
Projection
Collaboration
as Amplification

Difficulty
The role of text
http://cleanapple.com/l4d.pdf
Technology Integration Specialist
Buffalo-Hanover-Montrose Schools
Affinity Groups
Networking vs Cheating
Understanding meaning is an active affair in which we have to reflect on both the situation and the domain.
Learning Through vs Learning About
Internal vs External
Develop meaning in context
"They have to know, given the situated meanings they have given to each element in the pattern or combination, what the whole patern means in a situated way useful to action."
Good games are "crafted in ways that encourage and facilitate active and critical learning and thinking."
Real Identity
Virtual Idendtity
Projective Identity
Bridging Identities
Good games recruit and encourage identity
Without an identity committment, no deep learning can occur.
In a good science classroom a virtual identity is at stake.
"The learner must be enticed to try to ... put in lots of effort ... and to achieve some meaningful success for the expendeture of that effort."
If they identify themselves as a superhero, they want to act accordingly and perform until they act in a way that's worthy of the identity.
Psychosocial Moratorium:
A learning space in which the learner can take risks where real-world consequences are lowered.
Good games adjust to each level of play and reward each sort of player.
Amplification of Input Principle
Learners learn that they have the capacity to take on a projected identity as a real world identity.
The learner's hopes, values, and aspirations go into the process of creating their character.
Games engage learners in extended practice sessions.
Good games give players deeper, better rewards as they continue to learn new things and play and replay the game.
Build opportunities to operate at the outer levels of their regime of confidence
Stories are embedded in the players own actions and choices... and float vaguely above the learners, because they are so involved.
Situations give meaning to things and invite action.
If all you know - in any domain - is general meaning, then you really don't know anything that makes sense to you.
Probe, hypothesize, and rethink.
Expert Reflective Practice
Pattern Recognizing and Self Teaching
Gamers use print as it was intended; turning to when they need guidance, in useful, situated ways.
"In today's high-tech and fast changing world, the most valuable knowledge a business has is the tacit knowledge its workers gain through continually workign with others in a 'community of practice' that adapts to changes and specific situations 'on the ground' as they happen.
Become more like a scientist and less like myself.
Real Life is becoming increasingly segregated.
Online life is becoming increasingly integrated.
What's in our heads?
How can we leverage knowledge?
Use what games do:
Strong identities
Think like scientists
Be producers rather than consumers
Lower the consequences of failing
Customize the game to fit your learning and playing style
Feel agency, ownership, and control
Create solutions to complex problems
Present problems, let players achieve mastery, then throw in additional problems forcing adjustment
Go to the outer edges of a player's regime of confidence
Think relationships
Smart Tools
Distributed Knowledge
Performance before cofidence
Summary/Conclusion
Choose Your Path
Go to conclusion
@cleanapple
ryanmccallum.com
gplus.to/mccallum
1. A goal.
2. Rules.
3. Feedback System.
4. Voluntary participation.
What do good games have in common with good educational experiences?
Full transcript