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Photography: Composition

Basic tips on achieving a successful composition
by

Miss T

on 22 February 2016

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Transcript of Photography: Composition

COLOURS
COMPOSITION
HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL?
BALANCE
Composition, simply put, is how well you use the space in your photo
RULE OF THIRDS
Symmetrical







Asymmetrical
Distracting backgrounds
Composition: why is it important?
It may sound clichéd, but the only rule in photography is that there are no rules. However, there are are number of established composition guidelines which can be applied in almost any situation, to enhance the impact of a scene.

These guidelines will help you take more compelling photographs, lending them a natural balance, drawing attention to the important parts of the scene, or leading the viewer's eye through the image.

Once you are familiar with these composition tips, you'll be surprised at just how universal most of them are. You'll spot them everywhere, and you'll find it easy to see why some photos "work" while others feel like simple snapshots.
Imagine that your image is divided into 9 equal segments by 2 vertical and 2 horizontal lines. The rule of thirds says that you should position the most important elements in your scene along these lines, or at the points where they intersect.

Doing so will add balance and interest to your photo. Some cameras even offer an option to superimpose a rule of thirds grid over the LCD screen, making it even easier to use.
Placing your main subject off-centre, as with the rule of thirds, creates a more interesting photo, but it can leave a void in the scene which can make it feel empty. You should balance the "weight" of your subject by including another object of lesser importance to fill the space.
Look around for a plain and unobtrusive background and compose your shot so that it doesn't distract or detract from the subject. This can be as simple as taking a few steps to the left or right or cropping a photo.
FRAMING
The world is full of objects which make perfect natural frames, such as trees, archways and holes. By placing these around the edge of the composition you help to isolate the main subject from the outside world. The result is a more focused image which draws your eye naturally to the main point of interest. Sometimes to get the whole subject/scene in the frame you must flip the camera horizontal or vertical.
CROPPING
Often a photo will lack impact because the main subject is so small it becomes lost among the clutter of its surroundings. By cropping tight around the subject you eliminate the background "noise", ensuring the subject gets the viewer's undivided attention.
Adapted from: http://www.photographymad.com/pages/view/10-top-photography-composition-rules
Leading Lines are used to lure the eye deeper into a picture or to an important subject. Straight, curved, parallel, or diagonal lines are all good at promoting interest. Good examples could be roads, rivers, streams, bridges, branches, or fences but there are endless things that could be used.
LEADING LINES
Colours add heart to your pictures. Certain colour configurations can inspire awe and amazement in onlookers. Colours can be used to add all sorts of accents and effects, but you must be careful to not draw attention away from the main subject.
3.
Funny Distracting Backgrounds

http://www.buzzfeed.com/erinchack/photos-taken-from-exactly-the-right-angle#2hlc019


http://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesthis/33-photos-of-that-split-second-right-before-disast#2hlc019
http://www.buzzfeed.com/erinchack/photos-taken-from-exactly-the-right-angle#.wugna9LZ1Z
Full transcript