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A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

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by

Jasmine Coultrip

on 23 October 2014

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Transcript of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

for my own reference:

figurative/abstract, delicate, passionate
->

peaceful, dreamy (?)
A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning
CD Stanza 1
And though it in the center sit,
Yet when the other
far doth roam,
It leans and hearkens after it,
And
grows erect, as that comes home.


A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning
By John Donne
England, 1500's
Was forced to
switched religion
wrote many love poems
True love is consistent, so it requires no obvious expressions of emotion.

CD Stanza 2
CD Stanza 9
"Like th' other foot, obliquely* run; /
Thy firmness makes my circle just
"
But we by a love so much refined,
That our selves know not what it is,
Inter-assured of the mind,
Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss
This is a love poem; the speaker wants to tell his love to his wife how special their relationship is!
Conclusion
Annotation
As virtuous men pass mildly away,
And whisper to their souls to go,
Whilst some of their sad friends do say
The breath goes now, and some say, No:

So let us melt, and make no noise,

No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move;
'Twere profanation of our joys
To tell the laity our love.

Moving of th' earth brings harms and fears,
Men reckon what it did, and meant;
But trepidation of the spheres,
Though greater far, is innocent.

Dull sublunary lovers' love
(Whose soul is sense) cannot admit
Absence, because it doth remove
Those things which elemented it.

But we by a love so much refined,
That our selves know not what it is,
Inter-assured of the mind,

Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss.
Our two souls therefore, which are one,
Though I must go, endure not yet
A breach, but an expansion,
Like gold to airy thinness beat.

If they be two, they are two so
As stiff twin compasses are two;
Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show
To move, but doth, if the other do.

And though it in the center sit,
Yet when the other far doth roam,
It leans and hearkens after it,
And grows erect, as that comes home.

Such wilt thou be to me, who must,
Like th' other foot, obliquely run;
Thy firmness makes my circle just,
And makes me end where I begun

As virtuous men pass mildly away,
And whisper to their souls to go,
Whilst some of their sad friends do say
The breath goes now, and some say, No:

So let us melt, and make no noise,
No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move;
'Twere profanation of our joys
To tell the laity our love.

Moving of th' earth brings harms and fears,
Men reckon what it did, and meant;
But trepidation of the spheres,
Though greater far, is innocent.

Dull sublunary lovers' love
(Whose soul is sense) cannot admit
Absence, because it doth remove
Those things which elemented it.

But we by a love so much refined,
That our selves know not what it is,
Inter-assured of the mind,
Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss.
Our two souls therefore, which are one,
Though I must go, endure not yet
A breach, but an expansion,
Like gold to airy thinness beat.

If they be two, they are two so
As stiff twin compasses are two;
Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show
To move, but doth, if the other do.

And though it in the center sit,
Yet when the other far doth roam,
It leans and hearkens after it,
And grows erect, as that comes home.

Such wilt thou be to me, who must,
Like th' other foot, obliquely run;
Thy firmness makes my circle just,
And makes me end where I begun.

A
B
A
B
C
D
Theme

C
D
image
background music?
memorize poem
THIS IS PRETTY MUCH IT RIGHT?
simile
imagery
Donne’s love for his wife is beyond ordinary, sentimental affection.
ABAB Rhyme Scheme
Hyperbole
CD Stanza 5
CD Stanza 6
CD Stanza 8
Symbol of the BOOK
Our two souls therefore
,
Though I must go, endure not yet
A breach, but an expansion,
Like gold to airy thinness beat.
A book will always be a book, no matter how much you cry or laugh at the story, the words won't ever change.
As virtuous men pass
mildly
away,
And
whisper
to their souls to go,
Whilst some of their sad friends do say
The breath goes now, and some say, No:
Death --> not a mournful
gives peaceful image of the death to the readers

he
feels strongly
about this love and has high opinions of it --> there's something more than obvious between the speaker and his lover
So let us melt, and make no noise
No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move;
'Twere profanation of our joys
To tell the laity our love.
no need to express sorrow
alliteration of "laity" and "love" --> airiness;
peacefulness
of the poem
ordinary people, as distinct from experts
great disrespect
use of "o" sounds ->
soft, mellow, deliberate
= Being sure about something
abstract -->
dreamy
Thank you! :)
By Jasmine Coultrip
Judy Lee
relationship = compass
the speaker will eventually come back to his home even though he moves away from the center point, his lover
the speaker
assures
that his lover and he are just stretching apart from each other
The lightness of it shows that there is no urgency, and "gold to airy thinness" abstractness adds to
the dreaminess
.
= lulls the readers into mild and
peaceful situation
Donne's use of
abstract, delicate, and passionate
diction contributes to his
peaceful, optimistic, and dreamy tone
, ultimately supporting the idea that true love requires no expressions since it will always be what it was.
Diction, Tone
abstract , delicate, passionate

*Oblique: Slanting, not direct
Firmness, Just = He feels strongly about the matter, confident
Though obliquely- it is not forceful or direct
Peaceful, no complaints ->
Confident that this love will always remain.
Peaceful, Optimistic, Dreamy
= implies the speaker and his lover should take their departure calmly --> optimistic
Full transcript