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A Creator's Rights and Responsibility

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on 6 February 2015

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Transcript of A Creator's Rights and Responsibility

A Creator's Responsibility
Copyright, fair use, and the responsibilities of creators and users of creative works.
Realize:
Copyright Detectives

Once someone records an original idea, it is copyrighted.


Copyright is an important law that helps protect the rights of creators so they receive credit and get paid for their work.
Most things you find, download, copy and paste from the Internet are copyrighted.
You often use copyrighted work in your everyday lives:
(1) you use and enjoy media as consumers, and
(2) you incorporate media into their own creations (blogs, mash-ups, etc.).

Whether you are just using material for enjoyment or using it to create a new work, you should be responsible and respectful of other people’s creative work by providing proper credit.

You have to decipher the meaning behind some mysterious
symbols at the end of the video, “Whose Is It, Anyway?”
Your assignment: Figure out what
these symbols mean, and what they have to do with copyright!

Case Studies
Here Are Your Groups:
Learning Objectives:
understand that copyright is a legal system that protects their rights to creative work.
compare different ways people license their copyrighted work.
consider ethical questions about real-life decisions young creators
make in exercising their creative rights and responsibilities.
‡understand that piracy and plagiarism are irresponsible and
disrespectful behaviors that have ethical and legal implications.
‡brainstorm solutions to dilemmas creators might encounter.
‡consider ethical questions about real-life decisions young creators
make in exercising their creative rights and responsibilities.
‡understand that piracy and plagiarism are irresponsible and
disrespectful behaviors that have ethical and legal implications.
‡brainstorm solutions to dilemmas creators might encounter.
Copyright Laws
What is something you’ve made that you’re
proud of?

Review:
2. What kinds of information can make up a digital footprint?
a) Online photos
b) Comments that others post about you
c) Both a and b

3. What kinds of information would make a POSITIVE digital footprint? Circle all
that apply.
a) Photos of you doing work in the community
b) A newspaper article about your soccer team
c) A mean comment that you made on a friend’s website
d) A blog you created to showcase your artwork
e) Inappropriate photos of you on a social network site
What rights do you have as a creator?
What responsibilities do you have to respect others’
creative work?

Can you think of a time when you used someone else’s work in something you created?
Can you remember when you last copied, downloaded, or shared some type of creative work?
‡You can use things you find online as long as you:
» check who created it
» get permission to use it
» give credit to the creator
» buy it (if necessary)
» use it responsibly

‡If you aren’t careful in how you use other people’s work online, you might be stealing.

‡It’s great to be able to use things we find online, but we have to do it responsibly.We have to show our
respect for other people’s hard work and creativity by giving credit where credit is due.
Fair Use
Means exactly what it says. It is a “fair use” of a copyrighted work without getting permission from the creator. It allows you to use copyrighted work without permission or paying a license fee in certain situations.

Fair use can be applied in only these four specific situations:
Schoolwork and education
News reporting
Criticizing or commenting
Comedy and parody
Fair use can be used in these certain ways:
Use a small amount (not the whole thing)
For example: Using a little bit of a song in a mash-up, not the whole song.
Add new meaning and make it original
For example: Remixing clips from different movies to tell a whole new story
Rework and use in a different way
For example: Using a copyrighted photo image as the basis for a painting
Use for a nonprofit purpose
For example: Using a clip from a song in a student public service announcement about recycling (nonprofit use) vs.
Creating a remix video DVD and selling it on the Internet
(for-profit use)
If you use a copyrighted image, video, piece of writing, etc. without reworking it enough to have new meaning and make it original, they could be breaking copyright law.
Be aware:
You Be The Judge
You will view examples of a video and a song in which the creator has reworked copyrighted material.

You will then have to judge whether or not the new work is fair use.


Carolynn
Madison
Dean
Allison
Jocee
Wyatt
Joel
Jared
Olivia
Cody
Heather
Jazzmine
Trevor
Colton
Brandon
Dakota
Zach

What does it mean when we "rework" copyrighted material?
How can you tell if something is fair use?
Even if you create something that’s fair
use, why is it important to give credit to the work you used to make it?
Conner
Katie
Rebecca
Natalee
Sam
-

Key Vocabulary
piracy:
the stealing copyrighted work by
downloading or copying it in order to keep, sell, or give it away without permission and without paying

plagiarism:
the copying, “lifting,” or making slight changes to some or all of
someone else’s work and saying you wrote it.
Full transcript