Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

AP World History Timeline Project

By Mina McMichael, Naomi Litwack-Lang, Hunter Hance, and Danielle Kraycik.
by

Team Wolf Aplha Squadron

on 10 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of AP World History Timeline Project

By Mina McMichael, Naomi Litwack-Lang, Hunter Hance, and Danielle Kraycik Classical Era Timeline 600 BCE 600 CE Middle East
Theme 4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
When Cyrus conquered Lydia, he absorbed many aspects of their culture. One such aspect was coins with guaranteed value. Because of this, the economy gained a stable leg on which to stand. 546 BCE Middle East
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
Darius organized Persia in 23 satrapies. Each one was lead by a satrap, like a governor of a state. This allowed administration to be run more efficiently and beneficially. 521-486 BCE: 520 BCE: Middle East
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
Darius oversaw construction of Persepolis, located near Pasargadae (Cyrus’s original fortress) in Iran. Persepolis became not only a center of administration for the Persian Empire, but a magnificent capital with vast reception halls and massive columns. This was significant because it stood as a monument to the Achaemenid dynasty, and even today the ruins continue to tell historians about the empire. Mesoamerica
Theme 4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
Different City states of the Mayan civilization traded things like cacao, vanilla, jaguar skins, obsidian, bird feathers, shells, dyes, and salts. Also, metallurgy was pursued. These raw materials could be utilized in the different city states. This cooperation is what allowed the Mayan civilization to thrive. 500-1200 CE: Mesoamerica
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
Mayans showed hieroglyphics of hierarchy switching from chiefdoms to institutionalized kingship. These kings also acted as high priests and direct communicators with the gods. This reverence of leadership obtained Mayan consent of rule. 300 CE Mesoamerica
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
King Pacal ascends to the throne at age 12. During his reign, he expanded the control of Palenque and erected various architectural achievements. Even though he ruled from a very young age, he is one of the most successful and influential Kings of which we know. 615 CE: 500-479 BCE Middle East
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
Ionian cities rebel against Xerxes’ policies of intolerance. Their rebellions led to the Persian Wars, from 500-479 B.C.E. These wars ultimately allowed Alexander the Great to seize control of the Persian Empire. Middle East
Theme 5-Development and transformation of social structures
Four main social classes existed in the Persian Empire: kings, nobles and bureaucrats, freemen (craftsmen, farmers), and slaves. Slaves and craftsmen were the ones who truly enabled Persian society to continue, since they supplied food. Even though they had fewer rights, without the slaves, Persian organization would have collapsed. All Throughout the Persian Empire
(including 600B.C.E-600C.E) South Asia
Theme 1-Interactions between humans and the environment
Aryan populations in northern India became very dense, so some people decided to migrate elsewhere. Traditions & Encounters states that, “By 500 B.C.E. Aryan groups had migrated as far south as the northern Deccan, a plateau region in the southern cone of the Indian subcontinent about 1,500 kilometers (950 miles) south of the Punjab.” (95). This migration is significant because it made the Aryans expand with their culture into India, and allowed them to support a larger population. South Asia
Theme 5-Development and transformation of social structures
An anonymous sage created a book called the Lawbook of Manu, that dealt with the proper moral behavior and social relationships. This book also explained the proper duties of women as being the child bearer and maintaining of the house, while the man did everything else. This book influences the Vedic society and the relationship between people. First Century BCE South Asia
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
After the original "Rig Veda" was written, the three later Vedas were written around 600 B.C.E. These Vedas were collections of hymns, songs, prayers, and rituals used by priests in the Aryan society of ancient India. These works were important because they helped spread religious knowledge and prevent religious values from being incorrectly spread by mouth. 600 BCE South Asia
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
Ashoka, the emperor during the high point of the Mauryan dynasty, died in 232 B.C.E. Ashoka had conquered Kalinga, established a capital at Pataliputra, helped spread Buddhism, and integrated various parts of India with a strong economy and government. His death was significant because it lead to the quick decline of the Mauryan Empire, which disappeared in 185 B.C.E. 232 BCE 500 BCE Mesoamerica
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
The Mayan ball game was similar to basketball, except that they were not allowed to use their hands. This game was used for sport, punishment of criminals, conclusions of treaties, and sometimes sacrifice. This game gave the Mayan civilization a distinct identity that we can still recognize today. 3rd Century BCE - 8th Century CE Mesoamerica
Theme 5-Development and transformation of social structures
The Mayan social pyramid is divided in ahau (king), nobles, priests, merchants and artists, peasants, and slaves. Each class has certain duties and obligations. Just like all civilizations, these orders kept the society functioning well. Mesoamerica
Middle East
South Asia
Central Asia
North Africa
Oceania
Europe
East Asia Early Centuries CE Oceania
Theme 1-Interaction between humans and the environment
People continued to populate uninhabited Pacific Islands throughout the Classical Era. People reached Hawai’i in early centuries C.E, and would continuing spreading to Easter Island and New Zealand. Reaching these remote outposts of Polynesia wrapped up the human migrations from Africa that lasted thousands of years by settling all over the world. until 500 BCE Oceania
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
Until 500 B.C.E, the Lapita people placed emphasis on art and worked to obtain material for it, like high-quality obsidian. The Lapita people made pottery, shell jewelry, and stone tools. These forms of art encouraged the development of tools and trade between the Pacific Islands, helping to spread cultures. Middle of First Millenium BCE Oceania
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
By the middle of the first millennium B.C.E, the people of the Pacific Islands had created societies run by hierarchical chiefdoms. The leader’s eldest son inherited leadership, and relatives made up the aristocracy. The significance in this form of government lies in the fact that it led to increased fighting over land and power between societies, sparking migration to uninhabited lands. 400 CE Oceania
Theme 4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
Polynesian mariners learned about the cultivation of sweet potatoes from the western coast of South America. From 400 C.E. until a little after the end of the classical era, these mariners spread the crop within Polynesia and to New Caledonia and Vanuatu. This important spread of agriculture gave the people of New Zealand a steady food source, because many other crops were unable to grow in the temperate climate. 500 BC Oceania
Theme 4- Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
After about 500 B.C.E, trade routes used by Lapita society on the Pacific Islands fell into disuse, because their settlements became large enough to be self-sufficient. Before then, these early settlers had many trade networks across the ocean between other Pacific Islands. The end of these trade routes marked the end of these societies by isolating the people and forcing them to develop individually as populations increased. South Asia
Theme 3-State-building, expansion and conflict
By 324 B.C.E Candragupta Maurya came to power. The Mauryan Dynasty was the first to rule a centralized Indian Empire. This shows that this empire was the first to make an organized government so they would have had to make up their own ideas of state building and how to expand. 324 BCE 210-174 BCE Central Asia
Theme 1-Interaction between humans and the environment
The Chinese Han dynasty’s large armies invaded Central Asia during the rule of Maodun of the Xiongnu (210-174 B.C.E.). Chinese colonies were planted in oasis communities of central Asia. This was significant because it pacified a length of land that almost reached Bactria, while ending the Xiongnu empire. Fourth Century CE Central Asia
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
Buddhism reached Central Asia along the silk road. After merchants brought the religion to oasis communities along the trade road, it spread into the steppe lands by fourth century C.E. This was significant because Buddhism established a foothold in Central Asia and grew in popularity. Fifth Century CE Central Asia
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
In the 5th century, the White Huns from Central Asia prepared to move across the Hindu Kush Mountains to invade India. After being repelled by the Gupta Empire for the first half of the century, they finally moved across and established kingdoms in northern and western India. This is significant because it causes the Gupta Empire to fall apart, ending centralized rule in India. 545-539 BCE Central Asia
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
Between 545 and 539 B.C.E, Cyrus, the king of the Persian tribes, took over part of Central Asia. He incorporated it into the massive Persian Empire. This was significant because it encouraged trade and Central Asia became influenced by the Persian Empire. Including 600BCE-600CE Central Asia
Theme 4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
The steppe people were a nomadic society. They were Pastoralists because the arid land did not encourage agriculture, and they did not settle in permanent residences, throughout the whole classical era. This was significant because the lack of permanent farms allowed them to move nimbly and gave them an advantage in war. 100 CE East Asia
Theme 1-Interaction between humans and the environment
Around 100 Ce, craftsmen in china created paper out of hemp, bark, and fibers. This was easier for them to write on than the bamboo they originally wrote on, and was also more cost efficient. The creation of paper saved them time and money, and made it easier to record everything important that occurred. Fifth Century CE East Asia
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
In the fifth century Ce, Buddhism grew in china. It spread from foreign merchants, who originally brought the religion to china, to most of the Chinese people. This religion became the most popular within china during the classical era. Second Century CE East Asia
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
During the second century CE, there was the Yellow Turban Uprising. It was the peasants who rebelled, due to hard work conditions from land distribution. This rebellion weakened the Han Dynasty, and played a part in its downfall. Including 600BCE-600CE North Africa
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
In 264-146 B.C.E, Rome and Carthage battled in the Punic wars, leading to the fall of Carthage. Carthage had been home to grains, oils, wine, silver, gold, all of which were then Roman possessions. This fall marked an important transition for the dominance of the Roman empire. North Africa
Theme 4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
In the 7th Century B.C.E, Camels came to North Africa from Arabia, through Egypt and Sudan. These magnificent animals had the ability to carry heavy loads and travel long distances across the desert. Because of this, North Africa and Arabia flourished in trade and commerce across longer distances. North Africa
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
In the 1st century CE, Christianity spread through Egypt and North Africa, winning converts. The prominent headquarters sat in St. Augustine. This allowed Christianity to expand in numbers that creates more converts. East Asia
Theme 5-Development and transformation of social structures
Throughout Chinese history, including the classical era, Chinese society has been patriarchal. Women were to be humble, obedient, and devoted to their husbands. This was the foundation in which their society was built upon, and was backed up by Confucian values. East Asia
Theme 4-Creation, expansion and interaction of economic systems
By the end of the first century BCE, many Chinese pele had sold themselves into slavery in order to get rid of their debts. These people lost their land and everything else they owned. With the harsh working environments they were now in, they were unhappy and wanted to rebel to earn some of their land back. End of First Century BC North Africa
Theme 1-Interactions between humans and the environment
In the 2nd and 3rd Centuries CE, smallpox, measles, and possibly bubonic plague traveled along the silk road, infecting millions. The Roman population was reduced by one quarter during Augustus’ reign. This was significant because it greatly affected the people in North Africa under the rule of the Roman empire. North Africa
Theme 4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
North Africa was in an excellent position to trade with Western Asia. This caused rich empires to develop, which included Meroe or modern Sudan, c.600 BCE – 350 CE, and Aksum, a trading state in northern Ethiopia, from c.100 BCE – CE 1000. The growth and success of the lands depended on this trade. Europe
Theme 5-Development and transformation of social structures
The third century to first century BCE was a time of change for social order in Rome. As the empire expanded and became more wealthy, women were able to own a lot of land. This was significant because, while the men technically had the power, women became influential and did many of the jobs that men usually did, such as supervising finances. Europe
Theme 4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems
In second century CE, slaves made up 1/3 of the population in Rome. These slaves often worked in mines and quarries, under tough conditions. After a while, the slaves rebelled, causing serious casualties to the Roman people. Europe
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
By the third century CE, Christianity was the most influencial religion in the Roman Empire. This religion promoted equality of genders, something that prior religions had not done. This religion helped people of lower status to feel important, and not worry over their lack of wealth and power. Europe
Theme 2-Development and interaction of cultures
In 80 CE, the Roman Colosseum was created. It held 50,000 people. This structure provided entertainment for the Roman people, by hosting events such as chariot races and mock naval battles. Europe
Theme 3-State-building, expansion, and conflict
From the end of Augustus' reign in 14 Ce through the following two centuries, Rome expanded its empire. The roman armies conquered distant lands and integrated them within their growing society. The empire became huge, and spread over much of Europe. Third Century CE Second Century CE Third to First Century BCE 80 CE Two centuries from 14 CE 264-146 BCE 7th century BCE Including 600BCE-600CE First Century CE Second and Third Centuries CE
Full transcript