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Of Mice and Men Albion

A 12 lesson scheme covering the plot, themes and character of John Steinbeck's 'Of Mice and Men'. Reading assessment included.
by

Daniel Nicholls

on 3 February 2013

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Transcript of Of Mice and Men Albion

Year 9 Of Mice and Men Section 1 Social and Historical Context Living the Dream... Section 2 Section 4 The Great Depression Key Words People! Section 1 -
Section 2 -
Section 3 -
Section 4 -
Section 5 -
Section 6 - American Dream More on Context Although Of Mice and Men is a fictional story it is deeply rooted in historical fact.
The high unemployment resulted in many people travelling to find work.
They could be hired and fired at the boss’ will (farm owners were very powerful) Fact or Fiction? Dust Bowl Plains On Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929, the stock market crashed, triggering the Great Depression, the worst economic collapse in the history of the modern industrial world.
It spread from the United States to the rest of the world, lasting from the end of 1929 until the early 1940s. With banks failing and businesses closing, more than 15 million Americans (one-quarter of the workforce) became unemployed. THE GREAT DEPRESSION! Clinging to each other in their loneliness and alienation, George and his simple-minded friend Lennie dream, as drifters will, of a place to call their own. But after they come to work on a ranch in the Salinas Valley their hopes, like "the best laid schemes o' mice an' men," begin to go awry. Dictionary Race...

Look up the following words in the dictionary and write their definition:-
Itinerant
Junctures
Debris
Morosely
Brusquely Of Mice and Men

Despite these promises, though, very few found it to be the land of opportunity and plenty of which they dreamed. … is shattered!! During the Great Depression, economic and ecological forces (the Dust Bowl) brought many rural poor and migrant agricultural workers from the Great Plains states, such as Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas, to California. The History of Migrant Farmers in California The increase in farming activity across the Great Plains states caused the precious soil to erode.
This erosion, coupled with a seven-year drought that began in 1931, turned once fertile grasslands into a ‘desert like’ region known as the Dust Bowl. The Dust Bowl The depression also led to a drop in the market price of farm crops, which meant that farmers were forced to produce more goods in order to earn the same amount of money. Historical Context John Steinbeck was born in 1902 in Salinas, California, a region that became the setting for much of his fiction, including Of Mice and Men.
As a teenager, he spent his summers working as a hired hand on neighbouring ranches, where his experiences of rural California and its people impressed him deeply. About The Author = Wrote by John Steinbeck in 1937 Inspired by a poem written by Robert Burns:-

From the poem: The best-laid schemes o' mice an 'men / Gang aft agley
Meaning: No matter how hard or well we plan for something, our plans can often fail to become reality...or worse, they can end up going terribly wrong. So Why The Title Of Mice and Men? The state’s mild climate promised a longer growing season and, with soil favourable to a wider range of crops, it offered more opportunities to harvest. Hundreds of thousands of farmers packed up their families and few belongings, and headed for California, which, for numerous reasons, seemed like a promised land. The American Dream… Of Mice and Men is published. 1937 The ‘New Deal’ - support for unemployment. 1936 Franklin D. Roosevelt becomes president. 1933 1931 1929 Banks, Factories close, farming collapses Financial Crash Historical Timeline A question to think about – if you were this man how would you view the future? Hopes and dreams help people to survive, even if they can never become real. How true is this of the characters Of Mice and Men?
Of Mice and Men has been seen as a novel without hope, but it has also been seen as a novel which shows something positive. How does Steinbeck convey his ideas about human nature and human relationships? Past exam questions to consider All the characters are isolated and alone.
The men are rootless and have to travel for their livelihood.
The journey is endless, long and hard.
The dream is within grasp but always unattainable.
The idea of uselessness adds to the depression think of Candy and his dog. The Great Depression in Of Mice and Men By the time that Of Mice and Men was published Most of the wheat is harvested with machinery. Five men could do what would have taken 350 men a few years earlier.
George and Lennie are some of the last of the migrant workers.
They earned $2.50 or $3.00 a day, plus food and very basic accommodation.
On their arrival in Soledad, George and Lennie only have $100.00.
Candy joins and adds $300.00 to the equation which brings the dream of the $600.00 farm within reach.
The difference between the earning rates and the farm price shows how hard they have to work to achieve their dream. Migrant workers within the 1930’s Migrant workers within the 1930’s October 29th, New York Times records a drop of nearly forty points, the worst drop in Wall Street history. Within minutes entire families were bankrupt.
Crooks comments, he has "seen hundreds of men come by on the road an' on the ranches, with their bindles on their back an' that same damn thing in their heads. Hundreds of them. They come, an' they quit an' go on; an' every damn one of 'em's got a little piece of land in his head. An' never a Goddamn one of them get it. Just like heaven." The Great Depression The Wall Street Crash 1929 The American Dream in Of Mice and Men All the characters within the story have or had a dream.
The ranch hands wish to be their own bosses, and actually have stability.
Curley’s wife had a dream of being the a fimstar.
George and Lennie dream of the farm.
Candy buys his way into the idea of the farm.
Crooks dreams of being an equal within the farm and society. The 'American Dream' became a way of thinking where hard work, honesty and sheer determination make the 'American Dream' within reach to anyone prepared to make the journey.
The 'American Dream' of 1930s America was however, very different. In Of Mice and Men, set during the height of the Great Depression, the 'American Dream' had become a living nightmare. The land of opportunity had become the land of misfortune.
However, despite the economic obstacles of the time The 'American Dream' was still an aspiration to cling to. For many American workers, especially farmers, the hope for a new life was to buy land in California. The American Dream The American Dream and the Great Depression within Of Mice and Men. Migrant farmers receiving their work cards through a government scheme The American Dream When we first meet George and Lennie in Of Mice and Men they are already on the literal path towards American Dream. They have been making a journey, travelling and working across the south of the country.
Of Mice and Men portrays the American Dream as a symbol of hope and aspiration in an era when many people never achieve it. By labouring on the farms across America Steinbeck shows the sacrifice that George and Lennie are prepared to make in order to get work. They work hard and by inviting Candy to pool their money together independence and self-sufficiency are within grasp. The Setting for the Novel Of Mice and Men is set in the farmland of the Salinas valley, where John Steinbeck was born and which he knew all his life.
Steinbeck's father owned land in the area, and as a young man Steinbeck had worked as a farm hand.
The ranch in the story is near Soledad, which is south-east of Salinas on the Salinas river. Weed is nearby.
The countryside described at the beginning of the book, and the ranch itself, would have been very familiar to John Steinbeck. "I like ketchup
with my beans
George" 1929? 1928 1925 1922 Starter Q:
What are the ingredients of a good book? Learning Objective:
Begin to understand the social and historical context of the text . Social & Historical Context Did you hit the objective? Learning Objective:
Begin to understand the social and historical context of the text . Social & Historical Context Extension Q's Answer the following in the back of your books:

1) America was on a high before October 29th 1929.
2) How many people were unemployed in the depression?
3) True or false: people lost their homes in the depression?
4) Who was the president of America at the time of the downturn? Main Activity Watch the following clip about the depression listening very carefully…

In the plenary you’ll be tested on your knowledge of the events in America in the 1920s and 1930s. Mini Plenary Let’s use our whiteboards to recap and build upon today’s learning. Answer True or False…

The stock market crash took place in the month of November?
The 1920s, for the most part, was a time of wealth.
During the 1920s alcohol was prohibited?
Jazz was widely enjoyed in this era?
The economic downturn was the largest in modern history? Development The Great Depression
The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn starting in most places in 1929 and ending at different times in the 1930s or early 1940s. It was the largest economic depression in modern history. The Great Depression originated in the United States; historians most often use as a starting date the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday.

Farming and rural areas suffered as crop prices fell. The farming, mining and logging industries suffered the most. Starter Activity The following images depict life in the 1920s/1930s…

Look carefully at the moods, colours, styles and activities taking place.

Create a concept map of ideas and opinions of the images on your mini-whiteboard.

Ready? Why?
………………………………..................………………………………............

Can you give any examples
of books you’ve read?
………………………………...................................…………………………

What are your dreams?
................................................................................................ Bunny rabbits? Dreams? Flirting? Violence? A book about…(tick a box) What do you prefer? John Steinbeck was born in 1902 in Salinas, California, a region that became the setting for much of his fiction, including Of Mice and Men.
As a teenager, he spent his summers working as a hired hand on neighbouring ranches, where his experiences of rural California and its people impressed him deeply. About The Author Before we read the rest of Section One...
*Put yourself in the shoes of 1930’s American labourer..

WHAT life was like in the USA at this time?

WHAT could people do about it?

HOW might you feel about the future? Your family? Your government? During the Great Depression, economic
and ecological forces (the Dust Bowl)
brought many rural poor and migrant
agricultural workers from the Great
Plains states, such as Oklahoma, Texas,
and Kansas, to California. The History of Migrant Farmers in California One Washington correspondent noted...
“I see streets filthy, ragged, desperate-looking men such as I have never seen before.”
By 1933, more than ten million workers had lost their jobs. People ran out of money and there was no relief offered to jobless men and women.
Families left their houses and travelled literally thousands of miles to find work. ‘Of Mice and Men’ is set in the Salinas Valley of California, USA.
The place where John Steinbeck was born and raised.


When the Wall Street stock market crashed in October 1929, the world economy was plunged into the Great Depression.
In many states of America there was no unemployment money.
Without work, people’s savings got used up... It’s getting blamed for lots of stuff, like food costing too much and people not going on holiday.
What is it?...The banks have cracked down on how much money the lend to people.
When did it start?...In
America in 2007, it spread
across the world. What’s so scary about the credit crunch? The first section of the novel is set on a river bank.

What kind of atmosphere does Steinbeck create?

Find all the words and phrases that describe Lennie in
terms usually associated with animals.

Why do you think Steinbeck describes Lennie in this way? Animal Imagery Re-read the description at the beginning of the
novel and draw the landscape.
Write down some “quotes” to evidence
the accuracy of your picture.

Nature?
Animals? Starter - Description 1930’s American
Labourer Although Of Mice and Men is a fictional story it is deeply rooted in historical fact.
The high unemployment resulted in many people travelling to find work.
They could be hired and fired at the boss’ will (farm owners were very powerful). The Food Chain... or Fiction? On Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929, the stock market crashed, triggering the Great Depression, the worst economic collapse in the history of the modern industrial world.
It spread from the United States to the rest of the world, lasting from the end of 1929 until the early 1940s. With banks failing and businesses closing, more than 15 million Americans (one-quarter of the workforce) became unemployed. THE GREAT DEPRESSION In 1936 when John Steinbeck wrote this book, America was experiencing a similar crisis, but of far greater significance.
He wanted to write about the difficulties millions of Americans like himself were facing.
The crisis brought record
figures of unemployment
and severe poverty. How does it relate to O.M.A.M? This ideal became known as ‘The American Dream’. Early settlers went there to escape religious persecution.
Others went in search of land and independence. Until the
18th century, land was virtually the only way to gain wealth
or power.
Because America was a new land with no aristocracy, it
gained the reputation as a country where anyone, no
matter what their background, could succeed. All you
needed was talent and hard work. For hundreds of years the USA has been associated with the promise of a new and better life. The American Dream Learning Objective:
Gain a deeper understanding of the setting and context of the text . The Great Depression &
The American Dream Learning Objective:
Gain a deeper understanding of the setting and context of the text . What have you remembered? They would reap the benefits of their labour They believe they can do it despite being poor They would answer only to themselves They would own their land and home How does George and Lennie’s dream of having their own farm relate to the American Dream? Summing it up - Dreams George and Lennie Iceberg Starter What is Iceberg-ing?

TASK: Look at the following key quotes or ‘evidence’ thinking about ‘The American Dream’.

‘deep and green’ ‘golden’ ‘strong’
‘twinkling’ ‘fresh’ ‘recumbent’ (growing)

Question: How does Steinbeck show the West to be a land of promise? Use the iceberg effect for your answer. Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us. Learning Objective:
Analyse the relationship of our main characters.

What does George’s ‘story’ represent? George and Lennie - Plenary Example Iceberg
Paragraph Steinbeck uses descriptive language to show that Western America is a place of promise and plenty. The use of ‘fresh’ and ‘golden’ suggests wealth, riches and sunshine – a vital element of successful farming. Steinbeck uses words with positive connotations to hint at a better, more comfortable,
life in the West. Starter Q’s Learning Objective:
Analyse the relationship of our main characters . George and Lennie Why does George get angry with Lennie?
Do you blame him?
How do you think Lennie feels about
George?
When and in what ways does Lennie
demonstrate intelligence?
Why do you think George stays with
Lennie? Plenary 123 Windows? Doors? Plenary – The Bunkhouse Draw a birds eye view of the bunk house and
label with extracts from the text.



Beds?

Shelves? Do you now know what the ‘American Dream’ is?
At this stage in the novel, do you think they will manage to fulfil their dream? The American Dream George and Lennie are searching for the fulfilment of ‘the American Dream’.
Answer the following questions to show your understanding of this concept. Lennie George Fill the inside and outside of your gingerbread men.
Try to use words in the ‘inner’ that relate to their emotional and mental state and the outside for their physical characteristics.
Use the thesauri to find more advanced vocabulary.
E.g. ‘A big baby’ becomes ‘Childlike’ or ‘Infantile’ or ‘Irresponsible’. Starter - George & Lennie Learning Objective:
Analyse the living conditions of the men on the ranch. Living the Dream Foreshadowing http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xa5br5_the-sixth-sense-trailer_shortfilms What is foreshadowing?

A subtle hint about something that will happen later in
the book. Often a signal that warns of danger for one of the
characters. A way of creating anticipation and tension for the reader.
A way of making the reader want to find out what happens next. Read pages 46-54

Look out for Steinbeck’s use of foreshadowing.

Is there anything that hints that there is danger ahead? Foreshadowing... By the end of today’s lesson I expect you ALL to
understand the concept of foreshadowing.
Most of you will comment on the
foreshadowing in section 2, in relation to the
new characters.
Some of you will be able to make links between
the hints and tips and the foreshadowed events
in this section. Success Criteria http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xa5br5_the-sixth-sense-trailer_shortfilms The Sixth Sense Foreshadowing is used by film directors as well as writers.

Lots of reader’s spot Steinbeck’s hints and clues first time around.

M. Night Shyamalan though puts more subtle
hints into his film that raise lots of questions.

Do you remember what happens at the end?
Do you remember the hints and clues?

It is a great film to watch twice so you can spot
the use of foreshadowing! Section Two Learning Objective:
Understand Steinbeck’s use
of foreshadowing at the
beginning of the novel. Do we all understand foreshadowing?
Have you linked it to our new characters? At this moment in the story, do you see a happy ending for Lennie?
Which character poses the biggest threat to Lennie and George’s dream? Danger ahead? What do these quotes suggest might happen? Curley Curley’s wife “Hide till I come for you. Don’t let no-one see you” (George) “Gosh she was
Purty” (Lennie) “You keep away from Curley, Lennie” (George) New characters...How do you think they could
spoil George and Lennie’s dreams? Foreshadowing Candy Read pages 46-54

Look out for Steinbeck’s use of foreshadowing.

Is there anything that hints that danger may
be ahead? Candy & the
Power Struggle Candy Read pages 42-45...
Why don’t we ever hear the boss’ name?
Why can he speak to the men in whatever way he wants?
How does he behave towards Lennie?
Why does he still let Lennie work? The Boss The Boss Read pages 40-41...

> What does the Christmas anecdote tell us about:

The boss
The ranch hands
About how black people were treated Learning Objective:
Examine the struggles and successes of the characters on the ranch. Power Struggle Itinerant Starter – New hand word >
An itinerant is a person who travels from place
to place with no fixed home.

What does this have to do with the novel and its context? Key Word Starter Old Lonely Using the information we’ve already been given on Candy and the paragraph on Pg. 45...

Draw a picture of him labelling his physical description and personality.

Use your thesaurus to find alternative words for the ones I’ve found... New Character: Candy Curley Candy Where did you place your dot? Who is more powerful? Why? Write the characters
names on either side of
your page and draw
a line across...
Place a dot where you
think the power lies in
their relationship
on the ranch Who has power? As you read through the novel, notice how many of the characters seem to be underdogs. A more sophisticated way of articulating is to say that they are marginalized by society.

People are often marginalized because they are different from what is considered ‘normal’.

People who are marginalized are denied power and discriminated against. They are often insulted or excluded (pushed to the ‘margins’ of society) and are sometimes treated very brutally. Theme - The Underdog Read the end of section two...



What do you think of Carlson’s opinion of Candy’s old dog?
How do you think Candy would feel about this?
Why does he want to kill the dog?
What does it symbolise? New Character - Carlson What animals have featured in the story so far?
What has happened to them?
Is there much love for animals in the story?





Read the top of page 58... Animal Symbolism



WALT:
Identify the theme of the underdog in
Section Two of the story Section Two
Themes
The Underdog Is Curley’s wife really looking for her husband? If
not, what is she doing in the bunk house?
Why does George tell Lennie to stay away from
Curley’s wife?
Curley’s wife is never given a name of her own.
Why do you think this is?
Paying particular attention to the exchanges
between George and Candy, reread the passage
from ‘ “Say, what the hell you doin’ listenin’?” ’ to
‘He felt safe now, and he spoke more confidently.’
Why do you think the old swamper feels so
vulnerable? Questions The swamper’s old dog is a metaphor for all the underdogs in the society depicted in the novel. (Used in this sense, ‘metaphor’ means a symbol.)

So far, which other characters do you think are underdogs? Give reasons for your answer! Theme: The Underdog Which characters in the story so far could be considered an Underdog?
Are they considered normal?
Are they treated differently?
Are they weak characters and insulted or excluded? Survival of the fittest... Which pups does Slim drown, and why?
What would we do with those pups today?
Taking into account everything you know about Slim’s character, what point do you think this incident makes about the society depicted in the novel? One of the first things we learn about Slim is that his dog has just had nine puppies,
four of which he has drowned. The Drowned Pups Read Slim’s entrance on
page 55-57...

How is he described?

How is he different to our other main characters so far? Starter - Slim Vs Has anybody heard the term ‘the underdog’ before?
Who do you think would be the underdog in this game? Theme - The underdog What events do you think the following quotations might foreshadow? ‘ “Why’n’t you get Candy to shoot his old dog and give him one of the pups to raise up?” ’ (Carlson) ‘ “Look, Lennie, if you get in any kind of trouble, you remember what I told you to do?” ’ (George) ‘Lennie still stared at the doorway where she had been. “Gosh, she was purty.” ’ ‘ “You keep away from Curley, Lennie.” ’ (George) Predictions Slim and the Underdogs Section 3 Slim: The Mystery Man LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. Think about the character of Slim.

Slim is generally seen as the moral centre of the novel. Beyond that, however, some critics find him uninteresting. According to this point of view, Slim isn’t a properly rounded character: he’s just a tool used by Steinbeck to tell his readers what their moral stance ought to be.

For instance, we might easily suspect, as the boss does, that George is taking advantage of Lennie in some way. Slim’s acceptance of George’s account of their friendship shows that this is not so. The role of Slim Entry Activity: Write down two questions that you would like to ask John Steinbeck about the character ‘Slim’ from what you know so far. LO:
To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character ‘Slim’ within the novel. Slim: Man of Mystery… LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. A more interesting way of putting this is to say that Slim represents the author. With his ‘calm’, ‘Godlike’, ‘level and unwinking’ eyes he, like the author, sees and knows everything. What Slim thinks can, therefore, be taken as representative of the authorial viewpoint. The author’s stand-in? GROUP/INDEPENDENT/CLASS READING!
Can you remember the rules?
Take turns.
Listen carefully.
Help one another with difficult words or understanding. LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. Section 3 Reading: Reading: How might the woman react? What do you think the two men are thinking? Try to include a quotation from each column of your table as evidence! Read pages 64-68 and answer the question:

Slim’s quiet way allows George to speak. What do we learn of their relationship? LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. Slim and George LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. If we conclude that Slim is flawed, can we still take his word on the moral issues in the novel – or do these issues defy any easy resolution? (There is no right answer!) However, some critics believe it is a mistake to reduce Slim to the role of the author’s moral mouthpiece. Such commentators point to the ambiguities in Slim’s character and argue that he is disturbingly complex.

Which aspects of Slim’s character could be interpreted in both a positive and a negative way? Man of Mystery?
ALL:
Make simple comments based on obvious references to the text. (level 3) Learning Objective: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel



MOST:

Identify and explain the most relevant points supported by a variety of quotations.
(level 5)




SOME:
Choose succinct, precise quotations across the text and evaluate the writer’s viewpoint.
(level 7) Think of another piece of writing you could complete using TAP! Imagine Steinbeck’s editor didn’t want the character ‘Slim’ in the final version of the novel.



Write a letter explaining why he is so important. LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. Every book needs a Slim: LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. See how many ‘cinematic’ moments you can identify! Reread the first three pages of the third section. Notice how the writing has an almost cinematic quality. The characters’ movements, the lighting effects and the ‘sounds off’ are recounted with the same level of detail a dramatist might include in a play or film script. Cinematography LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. Calm Kindly Gravity Godlike Mystery Represents the author Moral Centre Write a sentence using today’s key words/phrases! I have learned that: Plenary Circle! T

A

P This helps us think about different types of text: TAP! Use the book to find extra quotes!! Organise the quotations into the most appropriate category: LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. Copy the Table: LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Slim within the novel. Slim’s eyes were level and unwinking “Nobody don’t know what Slim can do” Slim’s opinions were law delicate “Hell of a nice fella” gravity understanding beyond thought the prince of the ranch majesty ageless kindly gentle the light was not on his face invitation to confidence quiet and receptive calm Godlike Words for Slim TASK! The Boss! The Role Model! Mystery Man! TASK! LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. We are now halfway through the novel, and have reached the first major narrative climax.

Candy’s offer of financial help has made George and Lennie’s dream of owning their own farm seem possible…

…but Lennie and George have narrowly escaped being sacked after Curley attacked Lennie.

Choose a character and, writing or speaking from that character’s perspective, say what you think will happen next – and why. Predictions LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. Hotseat LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel.
Today we have considered Candy’s role in the novel.

Write down 3 questions to ask other people in the class about today’s lesson. Plenary: 3 Questions! Complete the thought-bubble! What is Candy offering to George and Lennie? Why? LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. Candy and the Dream… LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. Explain the relevance of this to the novel. Explain why you think this sign is outside the cinema.
ALL:
Make simple comments based on obvious references to the text. (level 3)


SOME:
Choose succinct, precise quotations across the text and evaluate the writer’s viewpoint.

(level 7)
MOST:

Identify and explain the most relevant points supported by a variety of quotations.
(level 5) Learning Objective: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel Candy and The Dream LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. We are now halfway through the novel, and have reached the first major narrative climax.

Candy’s offer of financial help has made George and Lennie’s dream of owning their own farm seem possible…

…but Lennie and George have narrowly escaped being sacked after Curley attacked Lennie.

Choose a character and, writing or speaking from that character’s perspective, say what you think will happen next – and why. Predictions LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel.
Today we have considered Candy’s role in the novel.

Write down 3 questions to ask other people in the class about today’s lesson. Plenary: 3 Questions! LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. Hotseat LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. Explain the relevance of this to the novel. Explain why you think this sign is outside the cinema. Complete the thought-bubble! What is Candy offering to George and Lennie? Why? LO: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel. Candy and the Dream…
ALL:
Make simple comments based on obvious references to the text.
(level 3) Learning Objective: To be able to recognise and comment on the role of the character Candy within the novel


SOME:
Choose succinct, precise quotations across the text and evaluate the writer’s viewpoint.
(level 7)
MOST:
Identify and explain the most relevant points. supported by a variety of quotations.
(level 5) The Ranchers and The Bunkhouse LO: To understand the importance of the Ranchers and the Bunkhouse. Think about newspaper articles:

1. TAP a popular UK paper.

2. Design an article called ‘Life on the Ranch’ (set in the 1930’s) . What are the key layout features? Remember TAP? LO: To understand the importance of the Ranchers and the Bunkhouse. Read the description of the Bunkhouse on page 64.
Draw and label it ! The Bunkhouse… Using the novel fill in the PEE grid below: LO: To understand the importance of the Ranchers and the Bunkhouse. On your own list down five activities which men (and men only) participate in today.


Why do men do these things?
Would men have been able to do these things in 1930s America?



Think/Pair/Share! Pg. 149 Pg. 67 George sums up the life of the men on page 67. “I seen guys that go around on the ranches alone. That ain’t no good. After a long time they get mean.” George is explaining why he travels around with Lennie and he is describing characters like Carlson at this point. Steinbeck presents Carlson as an insensitive, aggressive man and he perfectly portrays what the life of a ranch hand can do to a man.

At the very end of novel we see witness the cruel relationships between men at this time. The reaction of Curley and the other men as they enter the scene and see Lennie’s dead body is upsetting for me as a reader. “Now what the hell ya suppose is eatin’ them two guys?” The inconsiderate Carlson doesn’t understand George’s loss and he has lost the ability to feel for others over his time as a ranch hand. He doesn’t understand frienship or George and Lennie’s bond because he lives in a real world where the strong always overcome the weak. The Ranch Hands - Find my SPEED LO: To understand the importance of the Ranchers and the Bunkhouse. Who do you think took this photo? For what reason was this photo taken? Write your idea on your WB! LO: To understand the importance of the Ranchers and the Bunkhouse
What if everything I’ve told you today
was false?

How would this change Steinbeck’s novel? Plenary! What if!? PEER ASSESS!
WWW?
EBI? LO: To understand the importance of the Ranchers and the Bunkhouse. What does the magazine incident tell us of the ranchers lifestyle?
SPEED your answer! Look at the examples! Read Pages 72-73
ALL:

Will understand the importance of the Ranchers and Bunkhouse.
(level 3)
MOST:

Will consider the context of the novel.
(level 5) Learning Objective: To understand the importance of the Ranchers and the Bunkhouse.


SOME:

Will also demonstrate ‘confidence’ and ‘assurance’ in the main tasks of the lesson.
(level 7) Pages 100-104 Class Reading Word Starter:

DEFINITION: The action or state of setting someone or something apart from other people or things or being set apart.

Vivo points for the mystery word
and the MOST words. NETREGAGIOS Literacy Starter - Anagram Why does Crooks taunt Lennie when he enters his room?




EVIDENCE

“Don’t come in a place where you not wanted”

“S’pose George don’t come back no more”

“S’pose George went into town and you never heard of him no more”

“They’ll tie ya up with a collar like a dog” PEE? SPEED ? ICEBERG? SPICE? GCSE Paragraphing Learning Objective: Use key quotations to show a deeper understanding of a character. Weakness






SOME:

Choose succinct, precise terminology to evaluate character relationships.

(Level 6)






MOST:

Identify and explain the most relevant points supported by a variety of quotations.

(Level 5)






ALL:

Make simple comments based on obvious references to the text.

(level 4)






SOME:

Choose succinct, precise terminology to evaluate character relationships.

(Level 6) Learning Objective: Use key quotations to show a deeper understanding of a character. Weakness






ALL:

Make simple comments based on obvious references to the text.

(level 4)






MOST:

Identify and explain the most relevant points supported by a variety of quotations.

(Level 5) Non-Fiction! 1.
2.
3.
4.
5. Write an instruction list that includes five points you must remember when writing to inform... LO: To examine the features of non-fiction writing. Plenary! Complete the table! What is the layout of Informative writing? LO: To examine the features of non-fiction writing. Task! LO: To examine the features of non-fiction writing. Helpful and Clear Structure (heading, sub-headings, bullet points, pictures Lively and engaging writing! Answers the 5 W’s:
What? Why? When? Where? How? Writing to Inform! Why do you think the men are walking? Inferential What is the sign advertising? Literal LO: To examine the features of non-fiction writing. DIAL Q'S Extension LO: To examine the features of non-fiction writing. Come up with as many types of non-fiction writing as you can.

Complete the Spider-gram. Non-fiction texts Task! This is where a piece of writing is factual. What is non-fiction?




MOST:

Identify and explain most features and make detailed comments.

(level 5) Learning Objective: To examine the features of non-fiction writing.
ALL:

Identify basic features and make simple comments

(level 3)





SOME:

Identify most of the non-fiction features and make accurate and detailed responses.

(level 7) 2 Stars and a Wish! PEER- ASSESSMENT: How many ‘writing to inform’ features has your partner used? Remember:

Layout!
Interesting writing!
The 5 W’s! Task! LO: To examine the features of non-fiction writing. Pick out the key points of Chapter 3 and make a newspaper article. Sections Structure! T- Newspaper
A- Adults/Men/Employed
P- To inform LO: To examine the features of non-fiction writing. Heading Publishing Info Sub-Headings Pictures Read All About It!!! Crooks and
Segregation LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion Crooks is marginalized because he is black. In the USA at that period, black people were treated as second-class citizens.



Segregation laws (known as Jim Crow laws from a derogatory term for a black person) dominated every area of life and frequently affected Native Americans and people of Asian origin as well as African Americans. Marginalization: race LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion In your groups, freeze-frame the scene on the picture…


1. Each pick a character from the picture.
2. Write down a thought on your WB.
3. Freeze-frame the scene Drama! LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion Essentially segregation meant that black people were confined to separate and usually inferior areas and facilities. They lived in different neighbourhoods, attended separate schools, and were barred from entering certain professions.

Some states refused to allow black people to enter theatres and restaurants.

Even public transport was segregated into ‘white’ seats and ‘black’ seats. Segregation LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion POINT EVIDENCE EXPLAIN What does this tell us about race relations at the time?






Think about the LO… How is public opinion of the period shown? Read Page 102. LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion AF2!

GO FETCH! Write down as many of Crooks’ possessions as you can in 3 minutes!!! Starter! Think/Share/Pair! What’s your opinion? Plenary! Write down your overall opinion of what we have learned today. LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion SELF-ASSESSMENT! CAN I ADD MORE DETAIL?

TURN YOUR PEE INTO AN ICEBERG PARAGRAPH! LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion POINT
EVIDENCE
EXPLAIN Why do you think Crooks has those possessions?
What do they tell us about his lifestyle? Think back to the Starter Task… LO:To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion For what reason was this photograph taken? Explain what is meant by the ‘American Dream’
ALL:
Make simple comments based on obvious references to the text.

(level 3)


SOME:
Choose succinct, precise quotations across the text and evaluate the writer’s viewpoint.

(level 7)

MOST:
Identify and explain the most relevant points supported by a variety of quotations.

(level 5) Learning Objective: To analyse how the text is shaped by the audiences’ preference and opinion. Marginalization &
Curley's Wife Tell me 3 things that you didn’t know 50 minutes ago…

1.

2.

3. Plenary! 3 Things! LO: To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. Think about the other women who are mentioned in the novel.

Lennie’s Aunt Clara
The girl in Weed who, like Curley’s wife, wears red, and who apparently shares her love of attention (she “rabbits in an’ tells the law she been raped”)
Old Susy who keeps the brothel in Soledad
Susy’s rival Clara, who shares her name with Lennie’s aunt

In the society depicted in the novel, women are perceived as falling into two categories or stereotypes: sex symbol or mother figure. Female stereotypes Spend 5 Minutes talking to your partner and answering these questions on your WB’s LO: To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. Where is Curley?

Why does Curley’s wife come in?

Why don’t the men want her to stay?

Why does she insult them?
What does she threaten to do to Crooks?

Do you feel any sympathy for her? Thinking about Curley’s wife Swap your work with your partner… highlight all of the writing to explain features your partner has used! LO:To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. Imagine you are a journalist and you are writing an article about her life…
Include all the ‘Writing to Explain’ features! Curley’s wife has left the ranch… Who do you think took this photograph? Explain how you know that this man has probably seen this sign before. LO: To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. LO:To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. But the men will not accept her as a friend because neither they nor she are capable of perceiving her as anything other than a sex object. Curley’s wife hangs around the bunk house and the stable because she is lonely and looking for companionship. Marginalization: gender
ALL:

Identify the basic themes
included by
the author.
(level 3)
MOST:

Identify and explain the main purpose and themes included by the author within the text.
(level 5)


SOME:

Identify and make informed comments on the key purposes and viewpoints and make accurate reference to the text.
(level 7) Learning Objective: To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. Eye-catching
pictures 5 W’s Catchy titles Lively and
Interesting words! We have looked at ‘Writing to inform’, let’s recap but this time look at magazine articles! Writing to Explain… LO:To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. poison rattrap looloo tart tramp bitch What do you think these terms say about the men who use them? Now think of all the derogatory terms the men use about Curley’s wife. Double standards LO:To gain an appreciation of Steinbeck’s purpose and viewpoint. Who is the better role model? Discuss in your groups… Does this happen in today’s society!?
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