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Environmental Science

Chapter I
by

John Gaffney

on 10 September 2014

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Transcript of Environmental Science

http://www.hobart.k12.in.us/jkousen/Biology/impact.html
Human Ecology
Is the study of how human activity impacts the natural ecosystems, and the environment.

Human ecology is the study of how human social systems relate to and interact with the ecological systems on which they depend. (Human Ecology: Basic Concepts for Sustainable Development. Gerald G. Marten. Sterling, VA : Earthscan Publications, 2001.)

Human Ecology also looks at the deterioration of the environment as we (humans) push the limits of what ecosystems can sustain.
Human Ecology
How humans alter the environment?
Can anyone give any examples?
Human Ecology
Human Ecology Examples
Human Ecology Examples
It is important to understand; with the rapidly growth of human population and the quickening deterioration of the Earth’s environment, ecological understanding is now urgently needed to maintain the condition of the environment support system which humanity depends for food, water, protection against natural catastrophes and public health.
Source: The Economy of Nature 4th edition; Robert E. Ricklefs. 1997
Human Ecology
How do we minimizes the way we alter nature?
What are the remedies?
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
Education
Government regulations
Global effort
Individuals like yourself
Human Ecology
Ecosystem – all the living and nonliving things that interact within a certain area; a web of life.


Ecology – the study of the relationships that exist between the living and nonliving things in environments.
Human Ecology - Is the study of how human activity impacts the natural ecosystems, and the environment.

Environment – an organism’s surroundings.
Vocabulary
Human Ecology
Important Vocab
What can you do?
Defining Human Ecology
It is important to understand; with the rapidly growth of human population and the quickening deterioration of the Earth’s environment, ecological understanding is now urgently needed to maintain the condition of the environment support system which humanity depends for food, water, protection against natural catastrophes and public health.
Source: The Economy of Nature 4th edition; Robert E. Ricklefs. 1997
Understanding H.E.
http://www.sbu.edu/uploadedImages/Admissions/Undergraduate/Scholarships_and_Financial_Aid/Education%20Pays%20W.1.jpg
Why should you work hard in school?
http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2011/0625_education_greenstone_looney/chart1.jpg
Why should you work hard in School?
"It's a marathon not a sprint"
Human Ecology
Remedies
A closer look at
the term
Resource
Resource
What is a resource?
Any substance or factor that is consumed/used by an organism and that can lead to increased population growth as its availability in the environment is increased.
Examples: Food, water.
Vocabulary
Space
Nesting space, hiding space, safe space, rearing space are all resources that some organisms need to have in order to reproduce and grow.
Resource Continued
Nonrenewable Resource
Not being replenished or formed at any significant rate.
Examples :
Oil, natural gas, land, coal, minerals
http://www.esf.edu/willow/graphics/ed%20modules/venncircles1.gif
Vocabulary
Resources for Human consumption
http://www.oksolar.com/images/06291.jpg
http://www.gsi.ir/images/Other/ha.jpg
Renewable Resources
Nonrenewable Resources
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/images/photo_01224.jpg
Renewable Resource
Regenerated, capable of replenishment.
Example:
Solar energy, wind, trees, plants, water
http://www.design4effect.com/soc11/images/pg093b.jpg
http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://geothermal.id.doe.gov/i/oldfaithful.jpg&imgrefurl=http://geothermal.id.doe.gov/&
Group
Group
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
copy paste branches if you need more....
Point source Pollution (PS)
Are sources from which pollutants are released at one readily identifiable spot.

Example: PS waste water overflow, sewer outlet, smoke stack, power plant,
Nonpoint source pollution (NPS)
Does not come from a single source. It comes from many unidentifiable sources with no specific solution to rectify the problem, making it difficult to regulate.
example: NPS pollution would be urban run-off of items like oil, fertilizers, and lawn chemicals.
Vocabulary
water.tamu.edu/images/agriculture.jpg
http://www.howproductsimpact.net/box/systemboundaries/systemboundarieslandfilling.htm
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumb_58/1147059926r4HTss.jpg
http://www.deldot.net/static/photo_gallery/snow-jan05/index.shtml
Pollution Pathways
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/eye/impact.html

Pollution
Extinction
Resource Depletion
3 categories of Environmental Problems
Lets take a look
Nonpoint Source and Point Source Pollution
Remember your Vocab?
Point Source Pollution
Take this down in NB!
Temperate Deciduous Forest
Full transcript