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Dover Beach

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by

Elizabeth Bourg

on 16 January 2018

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Transcript of Dover Beach

Poetry Mini Project
Born: 1822
Profession: School Inspector
Important work:
Poems
(1863)
Poetic Interest: the isolation of individuals from one another and from society
Works Cited
Dover Beach
STANZA 1
Paraphrase
Matthew Arnold
Elizabeth Bourg p4
Matthew Arnold
Relationship to the Victorian Era
Arnold lived in a time after the rapid industrialization of England and there was a new found importance of material prosperity
Arnold knew that with great success came great anxieties, and expressed his feelings and attitude toward society through his works of literature
For example, while industrialization advanced society, the mistreatment of industrial workers and child labor also came as a result
The narrator of the poem is on a beach looking out into the water and starts by talking about how calm and peaceful the waves are. Then, the tone shifts and the narrator begins to reflect on human sadness and lonliness. We know that the whole poem is an apostrophe because there is no one present, but the narrator still uses the words "we" and "you". The last stanza switches back to a peaceful, and reflective tone where the narrator relates their longing and suffering to that of the world, and the ocean.
The
sea is calm to-n
igh
t.
The
t
i
de is
f
ull,
the

moon l
ie
s
f
air
Upon
the
straits; on
the
French coast
the
l
igh
t
G
leams and is
g
one;
the

cliffs of England stand
;
G
limmering and vast, out in
the
tranquil bay.
Come to
the
window,
sweet is

the

n
igh
t-air
!
Only, from
the
long l
i
ne of spray
Where
the
sea
m
eets
the

m
oon-blanched land,
Listen
! you hear
the
grating
roar
Of pebbles
w
hich
the

w
aves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up
the
h
igh
strand,
Begin
, and cease, and then
again

begin
,
With
tremulous cadence slow
, and bring
The

eternal note of sadness in.
Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Agaean
, and it brought
Into his m
i
nd the
turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery
; we
F
i
nd also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it b
y
this distant northern sea.
STANZA 2
STANZA 3
The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore
Lay
like the folds of a
bright girdle
furled.
But
now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to
the breath
Of the night-wind
, down the vast edges drear
And
naked shingles of the world
STANZA 4
Ah,
l
ove,
l
et us be true
To one another! for the
w
orld,
w
hich seems
To
l
ie before us
l
ike a
l
and of dreams,
So
various,
so
beautiful,
so
new,
Hath really neither joy,
nor
love,
nor
light,
Nor
certitude,
nor
peace,
nor
help for pain
;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
Form
no pattern in meter, stanza structure, or rhyme scheme
Attitude
1st stanza
complimentary
peaceful
somber (last line of stanza)
2nd stanza
reflective
somber
3rd stanza
melancholy
solemn
despairing
4th
hopefull
optimistic
encouraging
Title
"Dover Beach" is an actual beach that is located on the south coast of the island Barbados. This could possibly be the location that the narrator was when he was reflecting on the ocean/society.
Theme
The farther we stray from truth and faith, the more vulnerable and uncertain the future of society will be
Shifts
TONE
Line 13
tone shifts from admirable and "in awe" to disgust and misery
Line 29
shift from reflective/ somber to hopeful and encouraging
AUDIENCE
poem starts with narator reflecting and talking to society as a whole (apostrophe) and shifts in line 29 to the narrator specifically addressing his/her lover
“Free Image on Pixabay - Sand, Beach, Ocean, Water.” Free Photo: Sand, Beach, Ocean, Water , pixabay.com/p-937387/?no_redirect.
“Matthew Arnold.” Matthew Arnold Poems > My Poetic Side, mypoeticside.com/poets/matthew-arnold-poems.
Bing, www.bing.com/?FORM=Z9FD1.
Textbook
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
A
B
A
C
D
B
D
C
E
F
C
G
F
G
15
16
17
18
19
20
H
I
H
J
I
J
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
K
E
L
M
E
K
L
M
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
N
O
O
N
A
P
P
A
A
imagery
metaphor
personification/pathetic fallacy
allusion
parllelism/repetition
consonance
assonance
other
imagery
metaphor
personification/pathetic fallacy
allusion
parllelism/repetition
consonance
assonance
other
TONE SHIFT
imagery
metaphor/simile
personification/pathetic fallacy
allusion
parllelism/repetition
consonance
assonance
other
one extended metaphor
imagery
metaphor/simile
personification/pathetic fallacy
allusion
parllelism/repetition
consonance
assonance
other
TONE SHIFT
Full transcript