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Asch's Experiment

Matt, Liz, Charly, Arsalan, Jason, Kelsey
by

Asch's Conformity <------

on 21 March 2013

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Transcript of Asch's Experiment

Asch's Conformity Experiment Vocabulary and Definitions Props and Script Procedure of the Experiment Results of the Experiment Significance of Results Connecting the Experiment Unanimity - Although the non-confederate does not agree with what the group is saying, they base their vote on the unanimous decision of the group. Information Conformity - Going along with the groups ideology and disregarding your own opinion and thoughts.

- Conformity involves developing opinions and behaviours to match the attitude of a specific group. Normative Conformity - The person will conform because if they are apprehensive, the group will disapprove because they are being deviant. Confederate - The actors who are aware of what the experiment is about and are saying the wrong answers to try to get the subject(s) to conform. Scripts & Props Teacher - runs the experiment and informs the confederates that this is an experiment that tests conformity. Tells the subject(s) that the experiment is based on vision and perception. Confederates - the actors who are aware of the intention of the study and purposely state false answers to try and get the subject(s) to conform against their own opinion. Props - Flash Cards Reference Line A B C Reference Line A B C Reference Line A B C Reference Line A B C Reference Line A B C -75% of subjects conformed to the group, giving the wrong answer during the oral part of experiment.

- 25% of other subjects never conformed to the confederates’ pressure.

- Overall, 37% of subjects went along with the group the entire process.

- When a subject was placed with a partner, conforming went down 5% compared to the initial 37% conformation when alone.

- When a subject was asked to write answers down on paper, prohibiting the confederates ability to know the answers the subject has given, conforming went down 2/3's comparing to the 37% of the conformity rate. - Conformity often occurs when a person is isolated.

- Most people will conform to a groups decision because of apprehension.

- The support of another person takes the pressure off of the subject and reduces conformity. Marty (Madagascar)
- Marty tried to persuade his friends to explore the tropics however they were not interested.

- Marty conformed to the group decision, by staying in the zoo.


Betty and George Parker (Pleasantville)
- George conformed to the Big Bob and agreed to join the town council to fight the vivid change that was happening in their town.

- He went against his personal beliefs to fit in with the mayor's authoritative ideals for the "perfect" town.

Penguins (Madagascar)
- "Just smile and wave boys, just smile and wave."

- The lead penguin always made decisions for the group as the other penguins would conform to what he said. Marty (Madagascar)

- Marty tried to persuade his friends to explore the tropics however they were not interested.

- Marty conformed to the group decision, by staying in the zoo. - From the pictures, we can see how linear and structured the life inside the zoo was, with clear barriers and restrictions in the zoo to the straight, tall buildings in the backdrop of New York City.

- All Marty had were his peers and the zoo, and when he lost faith in his own home, it would have been too dramatic of a change for him to not conform and go against his only friends as well. George Parker (Pleasantville)

- George conformed to Big Bob and agreed to join the town council to fight the vivid change that was happening in their town.

- He went against his personal beliefs and vows that he made to his wife Betty, to fit in with the mayor's authoritative ideals for the "perfect" town. Big Bob: Everybody really likes you, George.
George Parker: Oh. Well...
Big Bob: No! They do! And it's not just 'cause you're a good bowler. It's 'cause people respect you! - This quote depicts Big Bob (mayor) persuading George into joining the council to fight the impurities in Pleasantville through some flattery and attention. Penguins (Madagascar)

- "Just smile and wave boys, just smile and wave."

- The lead penguin (Skipper) always made decisions for the group as the other penguins would conform to what he said. - The way Skipper runs the ship in this scene is a good example of what the end result of too much conformity can look like.

-The rest of the squad are like soldiers and have no mind of their own. - This raises suspicion as to how much valid information can really be obtained from oral examinations when the fact is, the majority of people are willing to put their personal opinion on the back burner to escape discrimination and save themselves from looking like an outcast. The Game of Death - In early 2010, a fictitious reality show "The Game of Death" aired on national television in France. This was really a psychological experiment disguised as a reality show to illustrate how far people would go in obeying authority, the fact that it's on television only reinforces that authority.
- A group of contestants posed questions to a man sitting inside a box in front of them in an electric chair. The hostess urged the chanting audience - who had levers in front of them - to send jolts of electricity into the man in the box when he gave an incorrect answer.
- Even when the actor in the electric chair screamed out in pain for them to stop, 80% of the contestants continued to zap him. The actor was not actually being shocked, but the players and the audience did not know that.
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