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Copy of New Julius Caesar Master

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Janette Stevenson

on 6 February 2013

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Transcript of Copy of New Julius Caesar Master

Act I Act II Act I.i Act I.ii Act I.iii Act II.iii Act II.i Act II.ii Act II.iv Dramatis personae Flavius
First Commoner
Marullus
Second Commoner Flavius and Marullus, two judges, notice a bunch of people partying in the streets during the feast of Lupercal. They decide to investigate the cause of this sudden celebration. Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Which character is the most important here? What makes that character the most important? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Let's head to the Powerpoint! What do Flavius and Murullus think of the crowd? How do you know this? Analysis Quickwrite Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Dramatis personae Caesar
Casca
Calpurnia
Antony Soothsayer
Brutus
Cassius coronet a crown made out of olive branches, signifying victory and excellence in leadership a fanfare of many trumpets flourish sennet the sound of one trumpet falling sickness an old-fashioned term for epilepsy or an epileptic siezure soliloquy when one character stands alone on stage and reveals his/her inner thoughts directly to the audience. 1. Why are Marullus and Flavius angry with the celebrating workmen?

2. What superstitious warning does Caesar ignore?

3. What things does Cassius tell Brutus that are critical of Caesar?

4. Why does Caesar think that Cassius might be dangerous?

5. Why does Cassius want to involve Brutus in the plot against Caesar? Selection Quiz Caesar speaks to his wife and a soothsayer.

Cassius and Casca attempt to convince Brutus that Caesar is growing more dangerous by the day.

Cassius reveals his plot against Caesar. Cassius – “The Thinker” Caesar: “Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look
He thinks too much, such men are dangerous” What is Cassius’ M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with Brutus?
What does he think of Brutus?
“Brutus thou art noble… /
Thy honorable mettle may be wrought /
From that it is disposed…”
How does Cassius deal with people? motivation A character’s motivation is the driving force behind his or her thoughts, feelings, and actions. Understanding what motivates a character is often the key to understanding an entire story. Working with a partner, look for what Cassius says to Brutus from page 698-702 and what his motive is for saying what he says. Use the following chart to help you. What Cassius Says / Does Possible Motive
for This Behavior exeunt a stage direction that is used to indicate when two or more characters leave the stage at the same time. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. Dramatis personae Casca
Cicero
Cassius
Cinna During a nasty storm, a few of the conspirators meet and reveal how their plot to overthrow Caesar are coming along. They are confident, but they know they need to convince Brutus to join them if they are to be successful. HSA Review What is the effect of setting this scene in the middle of a nasty storm? a. it reminds audiences that it is evening
b. it symbolizes evil and change
c. it shows how bad weather was in Rome
d. it is totally irrelevant In this sentence, the word "dagger" is used as:

a) a subject
b) an object
c) as both a modifier and a subject
d) as both a modifier and an object HSA Review "I know where I will wear this dagger then." HSA Review What word best describes the mood of this scene? a) celebratory
b) joyous
c) depressed
d) ominous Which of these features most clearly identifies "Julius Caesar" as a play? HSA Review a) its use of iambic pentameter
b) its use of metaphors and simile
c) its use of stage directions
d) its use of regular meter HSA Review In this sentence, the word "bondage" means:
a) disaster
b) financial burden
c) sickness
d) political opression "Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius:" Analysis Quickwrite Why do the conspirators want to make sure that Brutus is on their side? Let's head to the Powerpoint! Brutus
Lucius
Cassius
Decius
Cinna Casca
Metellus
Trebonius
Portia
Caius Dramatis personae Brutus wrestles with his conscience over whether or not to join in the conspiracy against Caesar.

The conspirators arrive at Brutus' house, and Brutus' wife, Portia, notices that her husband is acting strangely. Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. What is the main purpose of the information in this passage?

a. it tells readers that the visitors are ugly
b. it suggests that the visitors are concealing themselves
c. it shows that the visitors are proud to be seen
d. it reminds audiences that the visitors are strangers No, sir; their hats are pluck'd about their ears,
And half their faces buried in their cloaks,
That by no means I may discover them
By any mark of favour. HSA Review They are the faction. O conspiracy,
Shamest thou to show thy dangerous brow by night,
When evils are most free? O, then by day
Where wilt thou find a cavern dark enough
To mask thy monstrous visage? HSA Review In this passage, the word "visage" most nearly means:

a. intentions
b. wants
c. expressions
d. weapons HSA Review And for Mark Antony, think not of him;
For he can do no more than Caesar's arm
When Caesar's head is off. This is a classic example of:

a. metaphor
b. simile
c. paradox
d. rhyme Pretend the characters were paying you to manage their Twitter accounts (like some famous people do). Write out "tweets" that describe what's going on, but in our langauge. And you only get 140 characters a tweet. No profanity or acornyms. Assignment Dramatis personae Caesar
Calpurnia
Servant
Decius Brutus
Antony
Publius
Trebonius Over at Caesar's house, Caesar and Calpurnia haven't slept much due to the storm. Calpurnia is worried, and Caesar isn't sure if he's going to head to the capitol or not. HSA Review "The things that threatened me ne’er looked but on my back. When they shall see the face of Caesar, they are vanished.” This passage is an example of:
a. Simile
b. Oxymoron
c. Paradox
d. Personification To what does the word “they” refer?
A. Caesar’s face
B. Caesar’s back
C. The things that threaten Caesar
D. Cassius and Brutus "The things that threatened me ne’er looked but on my back. When they shall see the face of Caesar, they are vanished.” HSA Review 'Caesar, beware of Brutus; take heed of Cassius;
come not near Casca; have an eye to Cinna, trust not
Trebonius: mark well Metellus Cimber: Decius Brutus
loves thee not: thou hast wronged Caius Ligarius.
There is but one mind in all these men, and it is
bent against Caesar. If thou beest not immortal,
look about you: security gives way to conspiracy.
The mighty gods defend thee! Thy lover,
'ARTEMIDORUS.'
Here will I stand till Caesar pass along,
And as a suitor will I give him this.
My heart laments that virtue cannot live
Out of the teeth of emulation.
If thou read this, O Caesar, thou mayst live;
If not, the Fates with traitors do contrive. Dramatis Personae Portia
Lucius
Soothsayer HSA Review Judging from this passage, Caesar would most likely be described as:
a. ignorant
b. foolish
c. arrogant
d. dangerous "The things that threatened me ne’er looked but on my back. When they shall see the face of Caesar, they are vanished.” Which of the following choices is NOT an indication of Caesar's arrogance? HSA Review a. Caesar speaks of himself in the third person.

b. Caesar refuses to accept a crown.

c. Caesar's wife refers to him as "lord," and he does not take her advice.

d. Caesar compares himself to a lion. HSA Review a. angry
b. reminder
c. suspenseful
d. perplexing What modifier best describes the mood of this scene? a. it adds comic relief
b. it makes the play a tragedy
c. it heightens audience anxiety
d. it wastes time What is the effect of including a series of short scenes in the play at this time? HSA Review Dramatic Irony Occurs when the audience (or readers) know more information than a certain character.
Does this occur in this scene? Preview Major Subjects of JC The Mob Honor The Roman people play a pivotal role in the play. Who in the play is truly a honorable man? The Art of Persuasion Persuasion is used frequently in the play. Did you see any themes develop around the major subjects of the play? Write down your observations in your notebook. The Conspiracy Words to Know = prostitute = disease harlot cautelous = cautious = scornful spurn adder = snake insurrection = violent uprising visage = face contagion Terms to Know Soliloquy When an actor is alone on stage and speaks his or her mind so that the audience knows the character's thoughts and intentions. Pay attention to Brutus' soliloquies in Scene 1 and surmise their importance. A soliloquy is when a character is alone on stage and speaks aloud his or her thoughts. This allows the audience to know the character's thoughts and intentions. Soliloquy Romeo: "What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!"
Our star-crossed lover is telling us he sees Juliet, and begins to profess his love for her. This soliloquy is followed by one from Juliet, who argues that their last names shouldn't keep them apart:
Juliet: What's in a name? That
which we call a rose would
smell just as sweet. Romeo and Juliet Hamlet Hamlet: "To be, or not to be; that is the question."
This is the begining of arguably the most famous soliloquy, as Hamelt ponders about life and death, and whether it is worthwhile to live a life of pain and stress or to give up and die. Macbeth: Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle towards my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. Macbeth In this soliloquy, Macbeth is contemplating whether or not to kill Duncan. The imaginary dagger symbolizes the decision that he must make. Pay attention to when characters are alone and speaking! For a soliloquy to work, the character must be alone on stage, and while it may appear he or she is talking to the audience, the character is really just thinking aloud. Many famous quotes come from soliloquies. Interpret Pretend the characters were paying you to manage their Twitter accounts (like some famous people do). Write out "tweets" that describe what's going on, but in our langauge. And you only get 140 characters a tweet. No profanity or acornyms. Assignment What is Portia trying to accomplish?
How would you characterize Portia? Why doesn't Brutus want anyone else killed in the conspiracy plot? enterprise
= difficult task entrails = intestines whelped = a lioness giving birth valiant = brave augurer = a fortune teller Words to Know Dramatic irony is when the audience or viewer knows something that the charcter(s) do not. Dramatic Irony There are types of irony - situational and verbal - but for this unit, stay forced on dramatic irony. Can you identify the dramatic irony going on in this clip? (Hint: Spiderman and the Green Goblin) It's ironic because we know that Peter Parker/Spiderman is hanging from the ceiling, but the bad guy, Osborn (Green Goblin) doesn't know this information. Can you consider our knowledge of history an example of dramatic irony, since we know right away that Caesar will die in this play? lament = sorrow Word to Know Use of Figurative Language Analyze Your interpretation must answer the following:
 Most of what the character said isn’t literal – Portia isn’t really going to set a mountain before her. What is the meaning behind the lines? What does the character actually mean to say?
 Like most writers, Shakespeare purposely selects his words to convey the right kind of image. Analyze the words Shakespeare used to create the image. Why did he use those particular words? What meaning do those words have that translate into literal ideas? After developing the literary interpretation, create an image that is associated with your figurative language. You can draw or design a sketch, take a picture, or find a pre-existing image that conveys the language. I am looking for the image created by the language. 1 2 Take your interpretation and your image and put in into an Audioboo. Instructions can be found at 3 https://docs.google.com/a/pgcps.org/document/d/1ck5nLgAcDkOEHZXKim_dzxk703ylQE_MyFrUFLxQ088/edit This passage can be interpreted to mean blah blah blah. Shakespeare used this particular word because it means blah blah blah. Mini-lesson on figurative language A soliloquy is when a character is alone on stage and speaks aloud his or her thoughts. This allows the audience to know the character's thoughts and intentions. Soliloquy Romeo: "What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!"
Our star-crossed lover is telling us he see Juliet, and begins to profess his love for her. This soliloquy is followed by one from Juliet, who argues that their last nmames shouldn't keep them apart:
Juliet: What's in a name? That
which we call a rose would
smell just as sweet. Romeo and Juliet Hamlet Hamlet: "To be, or not to be; that is the question."
This is the begining of arguably the most famous soliloquy, as Hamelt ponders about life and death, and whether it is worthwhile to live a life of pain and stress or to give up and die. Macbeth: Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle towards my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. Macbeth In this soliloquy, Macbeth is contemplating whether or not to kill Duncan. The imaginary dagger symbolizes the decision that he must make. Pay attention to when characters are alone and speaking! For a soliloquy to work, the character must be alone on stage, and while it may appear he or she is talking to the audience, the character is really just thinking aloud. Many famous quotes come from soliloquies. Interpret Analyze Review Word to Know 1. Why does Brutus decide to join the conspiracy against Caesar?
2. What does Brutus believe might happen to Caesar once he is crowned?
3. How does Decius convince Caesar that he should go to the Senate?
4. Why is Artemidorus so eager to give Caesar the letter he has written?
5. What does the soothsayer tell Portia? Review On your index card, answer the following questions Act III Scene 1 Act I.iii Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Dramatis personae Cinna the poet
First Citizen
Second Citizen
Third Citizen
Fourth Citizen Dramatis personae Casca
Cicero
Cassius
Cinna During a nasty storm, a few of the conspirators meet and reveal how their plot to overthrow Caesar are coming along. They are confident, but they know they need to convince Brutus to join them if they are to be successful. HSA Review What is the effect of setting this scene in the middle of a nasty storm? a. it reminds audiences that it is evening
b. it symbolizes evil and change
c. it shows how bad weather was in Rome
d. it is totally irrelevant In this sentence, the word "dagger" is used as:

a) a subject
b) an object
c) as both a modifier and a subject
d) as both a modifier and an object HSA Review "I know where I will wear this dagger then." HSA Review What word best describes the mood of this scene? a) celebratory
b) joyous
c) depressed
d) ominous Which of these features most clearly identifies "Julius Caesar" as a play? HSA Review a) its use of iambic pentameter
b) its use of metaphors and simile
c) its use of stage directions
d) its use of regular meter HSA Review In this sentence, the word "bondage" means:
a) disaster
b) financial burden
c) sickness
d) political opression "Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius:" Analysis Quickwrite Why do the conspirators want to make sure that Brutus is on their side? Let's head to the Powerpoint! Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Preview Interpret Analyze Review Act V Dramatis personae Flavius
First Commoner
Marullus
Second Commoner Flavius and Marullus, two judges, notice a bunch of people partying in the streets during the feast of Lupercal. They decide to investigate the cause of this sudden celebration. Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Let's head to the Powerpoint! What do Flavius and Murullus think of the crowd? How do you know this? Analysis Quickwrite Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Dramatis personae Caesar
Casca
Calpurnia
Antony Soothsayer
Brutus
Cassius coronet a crown made out of olive branches, signifying victory and excellence in leadership a fanfare of many trumpets flourish sennet the sound of one trumpet falling sickness an old-fashioned term for epilepsy or an epileptic siezure soliloquy when one character stands alone on stage and reveals his/her inner thoughts directly to the audience. 1. Why are Marullus and Flavius angry with the celebrating workmen?

2. What superstitious warning does Caesar ignore?

3. What things does Cassius tell Brutus that are critical of Caesar?

4. Why does Caesar think that Cassius might be dangerous?

5. Why does Cassius want to involve Brutus in the plot against Caesar? Selection Quiz Caesar speaks to his wife and a soothsayer.

Cassius and Casca attempt to convince Brutus that Caesar is growing more dangerous by the day.

Cassius reveals his plot against Caesar. Cassius – “The Thinker” Caesar: “Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look
He thinks too much, such men are dangerous” What is Cassius’ M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with Brutus?
What does he think of Brutus?
“Brutus thou art noble… /
Thy honorable mettle may be wrought /
From that it is disposed…”
How does Cassius deal with people? motivation A character’s motivation is the driving force behind his or her thoughts, feelings, and actions. Understanding what motivates a character is often the key to understanding an entire story. Working with a partner, look for what Cassius says to Brutus from page 698-702 and what his motive is for saying what he says. Use the following chart to help you. What Cassius Says / Does Possible Motive
for This Behavior exeunt a stage direction that is used to indicate when two or more characters leave the stage at the same time. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. Dramatis personae Casca
Cicero
Cassius
Cinna During a nasty storm, a few of the conspirators meet and reveal how their plot to overthrow Caesar are coming along. They are confident, but they know they need to convince Brutus to join them if they are to be successful. HSA Review What is the effect of setting this scene in the middle of a nasty storm? a. it reminds audiences that it is evening
b. it symbolizes evil and change
c. it shows how bad weather was in Rome
d. it is totally irrelevant In this sentence, the word "dagger" is used as:

a) a subject
b) an object
c) as both a modifier and a subject
d) as both a modifier and an object HSA Review "I know where I will wear this dagger then." HSA Review What word best describes the mood of this scene? a) celebratory
b) joyous
c) depressed
d) ominous Which of these features most clearly identifies "Julius Caesar" as a play? HSA Review a) its use of iambic pentameter
b) its use of metaphors and simile
c) its use of stage directions
d) its use of regular meter HSA Review In this sentence, the word "bondage" means:
a) disaster
b) financial burden
c) sickness
d) political opression "Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius:" Analysis Quickwrite Why do the conspirators want to make sure that Brutus is on their side? Let's head to the Powerpoint! Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. A soliloquy is when a character is alone on stage and speaks aloud his or her thoughts. This allows the audience to know the character's thoughts and intentions. Soliloquy Romeo: "What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!"
Our star-crossed lover is telling us he see Juliet, and begins to profess his love for her. This soliloquy is followed by one from Juliet, who argues that their last nmames shouldn't keep them apart:
Juliet: What's in a name? That
which we call a rose would
smell just as sweet. Romeo and Juliet Hamlet Hamlet: "To be, or not to be; that is the question."
This is the begining of arguably the most famous soliloquy, as Hamelt ponders about life and death, and whether it is worthwhile to live a life of pain and stress or to give up and die. Macbeth: Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle towards my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. Macbeth In this soliloquy, Macbeth is contemplating whether or not to kill Duncan. The imaginary dagger symbolizes the decision that he must make. Pay attention to when characters are alone and speaking! For a soliloquy to work, the character must be alone on stage, and while it may appear he or she is talking to the audience, the character is really just thinking aloud. Many famous quotes come from soliloquies. Review Act IV Act I.i Act I.ii Act I.iii Dramatis personae Flavius
First Commoner
Marullus
Second Commoner Flavius and Marullus, two judges, notice a bunch of people partying in the streets during the feast of Lupercal. They decide to investigate the cause of this sudden celebration. Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Let's head to the Powerpoint! What do Flavius and Murullus think of the crowd? How do you know this? Analysis Quickwrite Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Dramatis personae Caesar
Casca
Calpurnia
Antony Soothsayer
Brutus
Cassius coronet a crown made out of olive branches, signifying victory and excellence in leadership a fanfare of many trumpets flourish sennet the sound of one trumpet falling sickness an old-fashioned term for epilepsy or an epileptic siezure soliloquy when one character stands alone on stage and reveals his/her inner thoughts directly to the audience. 1. Why are Marullus and Flavius angry with the celebrating workmen?

2. What superstitious warning does Caesar ignore?

3. What things does Cassius tell Brutus that are critical of Caesar?

4. Why does Caesar think that Cassius might be dangerous?

5. Why does Cassius want to involve Brutus in the plot against Caesar? Selection Quiz Caesar speaks to his wife and a soothsayer.

Cassius and Casca attempt to convince Brutus that Caesar is growing more dangerous by the day.

Cassius reveals his plot against Caesar. Cassius – “The Thinker” Caesar: “Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look
He thinks too much, such men are dangerous” What is Cassius’ M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with Brutus?
What does he think of Brutus?
“Brutus thou art noble… /
Thy honorable mettle may be wrought /
From that it is disposed…”
How does Cassius deal with people? motivation A character’s motivation is the driving force behind his or her thoughts, feelings, and actions. Understanding what motivates a character is often the key to understanding an entire story. Working with a partner, look for what Cassius says to Brutus from page 698-702 and what his motive is for saying what he says. Use the following chart to help you. What Cassius Says / Does Possible Motive
for This Behavior exeunt a stage direction that is used to indicate when two or more characters leave the stage at the same time. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. Dramatis personae Casca
Cicero
Cassius
Cinna During a nasty storm, a few of the conspirators meet and reveal how their plot to overthrow Caesar are coming along. They are confident, but they know they need to convince Brutus to join them if they are to be successful. HSA Review What is the effect of setting this scene in the middle of a nasty storm? a. it reminds audiences that it is evening
b. it symbolizes evil and change
c. it shows how bad weather was in Rome
d. it is totally irrelevant In this sentence, the word "dagger" is used as:

a) a subject
b) an object
c) as both a modifier and a subject
d) as both a modifier and an object HSA Review "I know where I will wear this dagger then." HSA Review What word best describes the mood of this scene? a) celebratory
b) joyous
c) depressed
d) ominous Which of these features most clearly identifies "Julius Caesar" as a play? HSA Review a) its use of iambic pentameter
b) its use of metaphors and simile
c) its use of stage directions
d) its use of regular meter HSA Review In this sentence, the word "bondage" means:
a) disaster
b) financial burden
c) sickness
d) political opression "Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius:" Analysis Quickwrite Why do the conspirators want to make sure that Brutus is on their side? Let's head to the Powerpoint! Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Preview A soliloquy is when a character is alone on stage and speaks aloud his or her thoughts. This allows the audience to know the character's thoughts and intentions. Soliloquy Romeo: "What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!"
Our star-crossed lover is telling us he see Juliet, and begins to profess his love for her. This soliloquy is followed by one from Juliet, who argues that their last nmames shouldn't keep them apart:
Juliet: What's in a name? That
which we call a rose would
smell just as sweet. Romeo and Juliet Hamlet Hamlet: "To be, or not to be; that is the question."
This is the begining of arguably the most famous soliloquy, as Hamelt ponders about life and death, and whether it is worthwhile to live a life of pain and stress or to give up and die. Macbeth: Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle towards my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. Macbeth In this soliloquy, Macbeth is contemplating whether or not to kill Duncan. The imaginary dagger symbolizes the decision that he must make. Pay attention to when characters are alone and speaking! For a soliloquy to work, the character must be alone on stage, and while it may appear he or she is talking to the audience, the character is really just thinking aloud. Many famous quotes come from soliloquies. Interpret Analyze Review The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Read Along Let the audio assist you; it's important to still read the text. You won't get the audio on the test. Listen to tones used by the actors. Pre-
Reading Act I.i Act I.ii Act I.iii Dramatis personae Flavius
First Commoner
Marullus
Second Commoner Flavius and Marullus, two judges, notice a bunch of people partying in the streets during the feast of Lupercal. They decide to investigate the cause of this sudden celebration. Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene?
Who are the characters?
What do we know about them?
How do we know what we know? Let's head to the Powerpoint! What do Flavius and Murullus think of the crowd? How do you know this? Analysis Quickwrite Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Dramatis personae Caesar
Casca
Calpurnia
Antony Soothsayer
Brutus
Cassius coronet a crown made out of olive branches, signifying victory and excellence in leadership a fanfare of many trumpets flourish sennet the sound of one trumpet falling sickness an old-fashioned term for epilepsy or an epileptic siezure soliloquy when one character stands alone on stage and reveals his/her inner thoughts directly to the audience. 1. Why are Marullus and Flavius angry with the celebrating workmen?

2. What superstitious warning does Caesar ignore?

3. What things does Cassius tell Brutus that are critical of Caesar?

4. Why does Caesar think that Cassius might be dangerous?

5. Why does Cassius want to involve Brutus in the plot against Caesar? Selection Quiz Caesar speaks to his wife and a soothsayer.

Cassius and Casca attempt to convince Brutus that Caesar is growing more dangerous by the day.

Cassius reveals his plot against Caesar. Cassius – “The Thinker” Caesar: “Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look
He thinks too much, such men are dangerous” What is Cassius’ M.O. (modus operandi) when dealing with Brutus?
What does he think of Brutus?
“Brutus thou art noble… /
Thy honorable mettle may be wrought /
From that it is disposed…”
How does Cassius deal with people? motivation A character’s motivation is the driving force behind his or her thoughts, feelings, and actions. Understanding what motivates a character is often the key to understanding an entire story. Working with a partner, look for what Cassius says to Brutus from page 698-702 and what his motive is for saying what he says. Use the following chart to help you. What Cassius Says / Does Possible Motive
for This Behavior exeunt a stage direction that is used to indicate when two or more characters leave the stage at the same time. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. Dramatis personae Casca
Cicero
Cassius
Cinna During a nasty storm, a few of the conspirators meet and reveal how their plot to overthrow Caesar are coming along. They are confident, but they know they need to convince Brutus to join them if they are to be successful. HSA Review What is the effect of setting this scene in the middle of a nasty storm? a. it reminds audiences that it is evening
b. it symbolizes evil and change
c. it shows how bad weather was in Rome
d. it is totally irrelevant In this sentence, the word "dagger" is used as:

a) a subject
b) an object
c) as both a modifier and a subject
d) as both a modifier and an object HSA Review "I know where I will wear this dagger then." HSA Review What word best describes the mood of this scene? a) celebratory
b) joyous
c) depressed
d) ominous Which of these features most clearly identifies "Julius Caesar" as a play? HSA Review a) its use of iambic pentameter
b) its use of metaphors and simile
c) its use of stage directions
d) its use of regular meter HSA Review In this sentence, the word "bondage" means:
a) disaster
b) financial burden
c) sickness
d) political opression "Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius:" Analysis Quickwrite Why do the conspirators want to make sure that Brutus is on their side? Let's head to the Powerpoint! Chart QUESTIONS, FACTS, and REACTIONS as we read through this scene as a class. You will need any mix-and-match combination of FIVE items by the end of this scene. Preview A soliloquy is when a character is alone on stage and speaks aloud his or her thoughts. This allows the audience to know the character's thoughts and intentions. Soliloquy Romeo: "What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!"
Our star-crossed lover is telling us he see Juliet, and begins to profess his love for her. This soliloquy is followed by one from Juliet, who argues that their last nmames shouldn't keep them apart:
Juliet: What's in a name? That
which we call a rose would
smell just as sweet. Romeo and Juliet Hamlet Hamlet: "To be, or not to be; that is the question."
This is the begining of arguably the most famous soliloquy, as Hamelt ponders about life and death, and whether it is worthwhile to live a life of pain and stress or to give up and die. Macbeth: Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle towards my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. Macbeth In this soliloquy, Macbeth is contemplating whether or not to kill Duncan. The imaginary dagger symbolizes the decision that he must make. Pay attention to when characters are alone and speaking! For a soliloquy to work, the character must be alone on stage, and while it may appear he or she is talking to the audience, the character is really just thinking aloud. Many famous quotes come from soliloquies. Interpret Analyze Review Watch each of these different versions of Caesar's death scene. Pay attention to:
the way the conspirators move on Caesar
Caesar's actions and reactions
the conspirators' reactions
Brutus' reactions
the timing of Caesar's famous line
Focus less on the cinematic stuff, like blood, music and background. 1970 Republic Pictures version 1980 BBC version "Rome" HBO Mini-series Mini-lesson Indicator 1.1.4 Quickwrite What’s going on in this scene? HSA Review What is the mood of this Act as it opens? a. angry
b. suspenseful
c. quiet
d. secret Dramatis personae Caesar
Soothsayer
Artemidorus
Decius
Publius
Cassius
Popilius Casca
Brutus
Cinna
Metellus
Trebonius
Servant
Antony Yet, stay awhile;
Thou shalt not back till I have borne this corse
Into the market-place: there shall I try
In my oration, how the people take
The cruel issue of these bloody men; HSA Review The main idea of Antony's lines here is:
a) that he will stay with Caesar's body
b) that he will head to the market place
c) that the conspirators are bloody
d) that he will give a persuasive speech a) rage, consolation
b) sorrow, sadness
c) remorse, revenge
d) depression, joy HSA
Review The tone of Antony's soliloquy (III.i.254-274) shifts from one of ______ to one of ______: “Blood and destruction shall be so in use that mothers shall but smile when they behold their infants quartered with the hands of war…”

Which word would the playwright most likely use to describe Marc Antony as he speaks these lines? HSA Review HSA Review Which of the following statements would NOT need to be cited on a Works Cited page? a. Caesar was killed by conspirators in 44 B.C.
b. Caesar first wore his purple garb for the first time in public at the feast of Lupercal on February 15
c. Caesar was stabbed at least 23 times and landed at the base of a statue of Pompey
d. Caesar deserved to live and should not have been killed by the senators HSA Review BRUTUS: Grant that, and then is death a benefit:
So are we Caesar's friends, that have abridged
His time of fearing death. Stoop, Romans, stoop,
And let us bathe our hands in Caesar's blood
Up to the elbows, and besmear our swords:
Then walk we forth, even to the market-place,
And, waving our red weapons o'er our heads,
Let's all cry 'Peace, freedom and liberty!' The author most likely includes this passage to show
a. that the conspirators are not ashamed of their actions
b. that the conspirators are still bloodthirsty
c. that the conspirators are afraid of the citizens
d. that the conspirators wish Caesar were still alive Warm-Up Imagine or remember a time in your life when someone hurt, deceived, or betrayed you.

Now is YOUR chance to get back at that person!

Write a quick sentence that starts with these words. "This is for the time(s)..." a) Cunning
b) Vengeful
c) Angry
d) Bloodthirsty Scene 2 The movie "Kill Bill" tells the story of a woman known as The Bride who is out for blood. She will stop at nothing to get her revenge. Based on the evidence in III.ii, which of these characters is most similar to The Bride in the film "Kill Bill?" a) Brutus
b) The Citizens
c) Antony
d) Octavius Pay attention to how Brutus and Antony work their audience. You are about to experience some of the most famous lines in literary history. What word would the playwright most likely use to describe Brutus?

What phrase best describes Antony?

What is the most challenging problem faced by Antony as he speaks to the crowd?

Which word best describes Antony’s attitude toward the crowd? Which of these best describes the mood changes of the citizens during this scene?

a) From frightened to angry.
b) From concerned to accepting.
c) From grateful to vengeful.
d) From angry to frightened. HSA Review What METHODS OF PERSUASION did Brutus use when speaking to the crowd? Logos
Ethos
Pathos appeal to logical reason appeal to credibility appeal to emotion What METHODS OF PERSUASION did Antony use when speaking to the crowd? Warm up Write a paragraph response explaining whether or not you feel Caesar deserved to die. Include details and examples from the text to support your paragraph. What is the gist of the speech?
How does the speaker try to persuade the crowd?
What are the reactions of the mob? Brutus vs. Antony Quick Write Methods of Persuasion Rhetorical
Devices Ethos Pathos Logos Mini-Lesson Attempting to convince someone by emphasizing credibility of reputation What makes someone
credible? Experience Education Authority Facts Wisdom Professional Reputation Once more: Ethos is an argument that appeals to people based on how credible the speaker is. The more we trust someone, the more likely we are to believe what the say is true. Attempting to convince someone by appealling to their emotions That's not fair! Now I'm angry! This is going to work! Man, I feel sad. I feel sorry for her. Motivation and sympathy are results of pathos I'm so excited! "To be persuasive, you must be believeable; to be believeable, you must be credible; to be credible, you must be truthful." - Edward R. Murrow, one of the world's most respected journalists Once more: The aim of pathos is get your audience to share the same emotion as the speaker. Typically, pathos is used to generate feelings of sympathy, pity, or fear. Attempting to convince someone by using logic What makes something logical? A step-by-step explanation of your reasoning Facts A+B=C Valid points Inferences The following 30-second video will have no sound. Use logic and make inferences to determine what is happening. Write down your explanation. How were you able to come to your conlusion? Also known as
"the three appeals" Rhetorical Questions Repetition Parallel Structure These are questions where the speaker doesn't expect an answer because the audience already knows the answer. The purpose is to get the audience to agree with the speaker.

"And ain't I a woman?" - Sojourner Truth Repeating a word, phrase or sentence can create a persuasive effect by getting a point across. People remember slogans and mottoes because they can be easily repeated.

"I have a dream....." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. To make a point, a speaker will structure his or her sentences in a similar way, with each sentence having the same phrase and clause placement. The effect is best when trying to provide a counterargument.

"Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do your country." - President John F. Kennedy Which of these statements best explains the effect of repeating the phrase "honorable man" throughout Antony's speech?
A. It shows how Antony genuinely believes Brutus is a noble person.
B. Antony doesn't directly bad-mouth the conspirators, but he makes light of Brutus' nobility.
C. People begin to question the honor of Antony.
D. The mob now doubts the nobility of Caesar and Brutus. Analysis of The Speeches
Each group will be assigned a character, either Brutus or Antony.
Determine the speaker's use of the three appeals as well as the three other methods. Find examples.
Explain how each example is persuasive.
Go to bit.ly/jc2012rhetoric
It is a Google Presentation. Read the directions on the first few slides. bit.ly/jc2012rhetoric Scene 3 Which of these themes from Julius Caesar best explains the behavior of the crowd in III.iii.?

a) Caesar was unjustly murdered.
b) The crowd is easily swayed.
c) A crowd can be incited to violence.
d) Brutus and Cassius will pay for their wrongdoings. HSA Review Combine these sentences:

The crowd mistook Cinna for one of the conspirators.
Antony's speech worked the crowd into a frenzy.
Cinna was a poet a) The frenzied crowd mistook Cinna, a poet, for one of the conspirators.
b) When Antony will work the crowd into a frenzy, they will mistake Cinna the poet for Cinna the conspirator.
c) After Antony's speech worked the crowd into a frenzy, the crowd mistook Cinna, a poet, for the conspirator of the same name.
d) Cinna was a poet whom the crowd mistook for one of the conspirators, and that was because Antony, who gave a speech, frenzied them. The Mob Often viewed as minor characters, the citizens or the Roman people, play a pivotal role in the play. This act shows us that. What do the citizens do in this scene?
How would you characterize the citizens?
Why are the citizens an important character in this act? Can you think of other instances in history or literature when the mob played a big influence into how events played out or the plot of a story? Which of these words best describes the citizens of Rome?
A. indifferent
B. indecisive
C. fickle
D. gullible A tragedy is a play where a series of actions leads to the downfall of the tragic hero, a character who starts at a good place but eventually loses out, usually in death. Tragedy and the Tragic Hero In this tragedy, Romeo and Juliet are well-to-do teenagers from rival families. They fall in love, but tragic events lead to their untimely deaths. Romeo and Juliet Tragic Heroes Romeo and Juliet Prince Hamlet learns that his father was killed by Hamlet's uncle, who is now the king. Hamlet plots revenge, eventually killing the king, but he and others sadly lose thier lives in the process. Hamlet Tragic Hero Hamlet By the way, the tragic hero isn't necessarily a "hero" by our standards. A tragic "hero" may not be a Superman-esque character. Macbeth is a nobleman who is persuaded by his wife to kill the king of Scotland and take over the country. He does so, but his guilt and the king's son eventually lead to Macbeth's death. Macbeth Tragic Hero Macbeth Who will be the tragic hero in the play Julius Caesar? Traits of a tragic hero
possess importance or high rank
exhibit extraordinary talents
display a tragic flaw - an error in judgment that leads to downfall
faces downfall with courage and dignity. Starts as someone who is well-to-do and is well liked?
Has a fatal flaw or commits a fatal flaw?
Flaw causes his downfall?
Downfall results in death? Hold up! The play is called "Julius Caesar," so shouldn't he be the tragic hero? So if Brutus is the tragic hero, why isn't the play named after him? Preview Scene 1 Scene 2 Scene 3 Scene 4 Scene 5 Analyze Go to Edmodo and complete the Analysis BCR on this subject. Be sure to include examples from the text. Assignment Closing What process must you use to answer the question, "Who is the tragic hero?" What must you do in order to answer the question? (Not the answer, but the how-to-get-answer) Preview "Well, honor is the subject of my story." 1. How would you characterize the interaction between the four men at the beginning of Scene 1?
2. What do you think is the purpose behind Cassius' conversation with Messala?
3. Do you agree with the staging of the suicides? If you were the director, how would you have done it differently?
4. What is your final opinion of the play? If you had one prevailing (leading) thought about the play, what is it? Film Review Warm-up
There are three major subjects to "Julius Caesar:" honor, the mob, and persuasion. How were all three of these subjects revealed in the play? Epilogue What happened to Antony and Octavius? Epilogue Antony eventually went on to rule Rome’s western provinces.
However, he and Octavius quarreled often, especially when Octavius could not support Antony’s war efforts in the Middle East.
To make peace, Antony married Octavius’ daughter, Octavia. Before he died, Antony had been married four times and had about 11 kids with five women.
Antony was disliked for his hedonistic lifestyle. Antony and Octavius finally split ways when Antony abandoned Octavia in Rome to be with Cleopatra.
Octavius and Antony eventually went to war. In the naval Battle of Actium, Octavius’ forces defeated Antony.
To avoid being captured, Antony and Cleopatra committed suicide. Epilogue Octavius went on to become the sole leader of Rome. While Rome still had a Senate, Octavius pretty much ruled everything by himself – he essentially become a dictator.
The Senate honored him by changing his name to Augustus, meaning “revered one.”
Augustus began a line of Roman rulers who held sole power. Future rulers would take the name “Caesar,” “Julius,” or “Augustus.” Epilogue Augustus may have been a “dictator” by having sole power, yet he is known for his good works.
He expanded Rome’s territories through small wars and peace treaties. His effort led to the beginning of the Roman Empire.
Augustus’ reign began 200 years of peace in the Mediterranean.
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