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Avianca 52

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by

Eva Swiderska

on 31 October 2013

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Transcript of Avianca 52

Avianca 52
Flight Crews Performance
- The flight crew delayed its concern about have fuel issues
- When requested priority handling they already used fuel for alternate
- An emergency should have been declared
- The airplane exhausted its fuel supply and crashed 47 minutes after the flight crew stated that there was not sufficient fuel to make it to the alternate
- Total breakdown in communication in relaying the situation to ATC


ATC Performance
- The Safety board concluded that communications and handling of AVA052 were proper

- Safety board found in interviews that controllers didn’t place significance on the word “priority”

- Controllers are in fact required to provide priority handling

Introduction
Date: January 25, 1990
Summary: Fuel exhaustion
Site: Cove Neck, New York, United States
Passengers: 158
Crew: 9
Aircraft type: Boeing 707-321B
Operator: Avianca
Flight origin: El Dorado International Airport
Stopover: José María Córdova Int'l Airport
Destination: John F. Kennedy Int'l Airport
Analysis
This Accident focuses on

- The flight planning
- Flight crew’s performance during flight
- ATC performance during flight

Safety board believed the two main factors were:

Failure of flight crew to notify ATC of fuel situation to assure arrival at the approach fix

A break down in communications between the flight crew and ATC, and also between flight crew members
Flight Planning
- Safety board found inadequacies in the dispatching services of AVA052
Weather data out of date. Alternate airports forecast were below minimums
Did not have current upper air data
Documents didn’t reflect actual gross weight of airplane upon departure
Fuel did not account for extensive en route and traffic delays at JFK

- If the weather maps would have been updated the flight crew could have anticipated for fuel or different alternative airports
- Despite the inadequacies found the airplane still had enough fuel to arrive at the destination airport

Ewa Swiderka, Jacob Karasiewicz, Gerald Navarro
Injuries (non-fatal): 85
Fatalities: 73
Survivors: 85

Passengers & Injuries
General Recommendations:

Develop in cooperation with the International Civil Aviation Organization a standardized glossary of definitions, terms, words, and phrases to be used that are clearly understandable to both pilots and air traffic controllers regarding minimum and emergency fuel communications

Conduct a comprehensive study of the Central Flow Control Facility and the Traffic Management System, by the Office of Safety/Quality Assurance, to determine the effectiveness and appropriateness of training, responsibilities, procedures, and methods of application for the Traffic Management System.

Safety recommendations to Avianca 52
FAA Recommendations
Immediately notify all domestic and foreign air carriers to emphasize that all pilots operating commercial air transport flights in the U.S. National Airspace System must be thoroughly knowledgeable of the flight operating and air traffic control rules and procedures, including standard phraseology, for operating in the U.S. NAS. Immediately disseminate the contents of the recommendation to all air carrier operators involved in commercial air transport operations in the U.S.

Develop in cooperation with the International Civil Aviation Organization a standardized glossary of definitions, terms, words, and phrases to be used that are clearly understandable to both pilots and air traffic controllers regarding minimum and emergency fuel communications.

Conduct a comprehensive study of the Central Flow Control Facility and the Traffic Management System, by the Office of Safety/Quality Assurance, to determine the effectiveness and appropriateness of training, responsibilities, procedures, and methods of application for the Traffic Management System.

Require that transport category airplane flight manuals include procedures specifying minimum fuel values for various phases of airline flights at which a landing should not be delayed and when emergency handling by ATC should be requested.

The manual requirement and associated amendments to regulations and procedures should include criteria for when ATC must be notified that the airplane must be en route to its destination or alternate airport via routine handling, and when emergency handling is required. Incorporate into air route traffic control centers equipment to provide a recorded broadcast of traffic management information that can be monitored by all aircraft within each center's boundaries to provide pilots with early indications of potential delays enroute.

Review policies, procedures, training, and oversight activity to ensure that adequate emphasis is being placed on the dual responsibility that flight dispatchers and flight crews have in keeping each other informed of events and situations that differ from those mutually agreed upon in the dispatch release

Require that Avianca Airlines incorporate Cockpit Resource Management and Line Oriented Flight Training concepts into its flight crew training program

Director of DAAC in Colombia Recommendations
Facts
23-year-old Boeing 707
Late departure
51-year-old Captain Laureano Caviedes
28-year-old First Officer Mauricio Klotz
44-year-old Flight Engineer Matias Moyano
Bad weather
Put into hold pattern
Failure in Communications
The recovery efforts for Flight 52 proved to be difficult
Hilly, sparsely populated North Shore
Narrow, winding roads
Weather conditions and the dark night
Traffic jam
Emergency Response
Following Flight 52, air traffic controllers were more conservative in determining if Avianca flights were running low on fuel and required priority landing


Conclusion
Questions?
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