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Beauty Is In The Eyes of The Beholder

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Kristen Dinger

on 14 October 2013

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Transcript of Beauty Is In The Eyes of The Beholder

Beauty Is In The Eyes of The Beholder
Welcome to Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder
There are all kinds of artists in the world. There are amateur artists, commercial artists, highly creative folk artists, to professional artists that were educated in art schools and universities. All of these different artists have something in common. They all strive to inspire wonder and awe in the viewer with what they created. (Theory of Art, n.d.) There are many different reasons why artists want to inspire wonder in their audience. They may want to confuse, to shock, to inform, to stir someone for change, or even cause a feeling of disgust. Most commonly however, artists have striven to inspire people through harmony and beauty.

Art Deco Vs. Modern Art
Fashion Vs. Art
Karl Otto Lagerfelt was born in 1933 to a wealthy German businessman father and Swedish mother in pre-war Germany. Karl Lagerfeld is the master of reinvention, having repeatedly transformed himself as well as his labels. He is currently the  creative director of Chanel, Fendi and his eponymous label. He has previously designed for Chloe and created a range for H&M.

KARL LAGERFELDFASHION DESIGNER
Fendi began as a fur and leather workshop, owned by Edoardo and Adele Fendi.  The Fendi's had five daughters; Paola (born in 1931), Anna (born in 1933), Franca (born in 1935), Carla (born in 1937), and Alda (born in 1940).  All five daughters are credited with making the Fendi label known throughout the world.  In 1964, they began their collaboration with Karl Lagerfeld, who helped develop a renewed interest in furs
During this time, the famous black and brown double “F,” one of the first company logos, was created. One of the characteristics of the Fendi label is the company’s unusual way of working with traditional skins.  Fendi designers were continually experimenting on furs and in 1969, with the introduction of their Pret a Porter line, Fendi succeeded in producing a product accessible to the ordinary consumer:  beautiful furs at a limited price.  In 1968 Classic Canvas was launched, an alternative to leather; then striped colored rubber, beige and black, which became Fendi’s classic colors.
When Adele died in 1978, each of the five Fendi children took over a different part of the business:  Paola was primarily interested in furs; Anna, in leather goods; Franca handled customer relations; Carla coordinated the business, and Alda was responsible for sales.  In the 1980s, Fendi underwent a period of considerable expansion, involving product diversification and licensing.  A wide range of products now display the Fendi label; sweaters, suits, jeans, umbrellas, clocks, ceramics, and household decorations.

FENDI FASHION DESIGNER
Born Karl Anderson Jr. on Long Island, New York, on August 9, 1959, famed fashion designer Michael David Kors was raised on New York's Long Island. As a toddler, Kors worked as a model, appearing in national campaigns for products such as toilet paper and Lucky Charms cereal. Kors biological parents split when he was quite young, and he got his new name at the age of 5, when his mother married businessman Bill Kors. "My mother said, 'You're getting a new last name, so why don't you pick a new first name?'" Kors recalled. He chose Michael as his first name and his second-favorite, David, as his middle name. His mother also allowed him to design her wedding dress. Kors, already a fashion addict, was thrilled with the prospect. "The marriage didn't last, [but] the pictures are timeless," Kors quipped later.
Kors's simple, elegantly tailored clothing and his charmingly persuasive sales techniques proved to be a winning combination. Kors traveled across the United States for small fashion shows at private homes, known as "trunk shows." When he was 23, he convinced the formidable fashion editor Anna Wintour—then of New York magazine, now the editor of Vogue—to view his collection. The glitzy Madison Avenue showrooms he'd later have were still a long way off; Kors displayed the collection laid out on his bed in his apartment. From these humble beginnings, he soon picked up celebrity fans like Barbara Walters and earned awards for his designs.

Michael KorsFashion Deginer
Gucci was born in the year 1881 in the Italy's northern manufacturing region. He was the son of an Italian merchant. He started the House of Gucci as a small family owned leather saddlery shop in 1906. Being an excellent craftsman he stated selling leather bag to the horsemen in 1920. Manufacturing high-quality products he soon started gaining reputation for his work and started hiring people to work in his small organization. But the expansion plans were on cards and Gucci expanded his business to the capital, Rome in 1938 where he opened his first retail outlet. The business which was solely handled by him turned out to be a family affair as all his sons joined the company. In 1951 Gucci further expanded his business to Milan where he opened his store and a couple of years later in Manhattan.
Guccio GucciFashion Designer
Pablo Picasso was born October 25, 1981, in malaga spain, Pablo Picasso started to paint when he was eight years old, like many children he would make drawings, but these were very different to today’s childrens drawings. Pablo Picasso took drawing lessons at school in Malaga. The highly systematic approach to art would develop Picasso’s remarkable sense of space and geometry and lay a foundation for the ease with which he would later be able to characterize an object wit a single line.

Pablo PicassoArtist
Hefferan was born in 1968 in Warrington, Cheshire in the north of England. He began drawing and painting as a small child. “I wanted to be an artist for as long as I can remember”, says Rob. “I remember copying dinosaurs and spaceships from pictures books and feeling frustration at the fact that I could not draw as well as the illustrators from the books”. During family holidays to Cornwall in... the southwest UK, Rob would paint en plein air and also enjoyed copying works from the Impressionists. Throughout high school and college, Rob entered and won many art competitions
 

Rob Hefferan Artist

Judith Leyster was born in Haarlem in 1609. Her father operated a brewery called the “Ley-ster” (lode or guide star) from which the family took its name. Very little is known about her early life or her training as an artist. It is often presumed that she studied with the prominent Haarlem history painter Frans Pietersz de Grebber, because they were mentioned together in Ampzing’s 1628 paean to Haarlem. Not long after its publication, her family moved to the town of Vreeland, near Utrecht, where Leyster would have encountered the so-called Utrecht Caravaggisti—artists who had traveled to Rome and absorbed the Italian painter’s dramatic style. Several of Leyster’s paintings do exhibit similarly strong contrasts of dark and light. However, the family was in Vreeland only briefly and had resettled near Amsterdam by the fall of 1629. Perhaps Leyster absorbed a rather altered type of Caravaggism from Frans Hals and his circle in Haarlem. She had returned there at least by November 1631 when she witnessed the baptism of one of Hals’ children.


Judith LeysterArtist
Henry Battle, a.k.a. Hbatto, a Californian native and well traveled Air Force veteran, now rooted in Atlanta GA, describes his style as richly realistic figurative snapshots of life. His subject matter ranges from spiritual and family-oriented, to romantic moments that he freezes in time.After feeling the passion of his subjects from a distance, he wants the viewer to walk up close and be drawn into the detail of it, discovering a bit more each time. Henry produced his first artwork a limited edition, colored pencil drawing entitled Last Single Thoughts while stationed at Ramstein Air Base, Germany in 1991.

Henry L. BatttleArtist
This too shall pass
Self Portrait
Arts and Crafts, Realistic, Futuristic and Surrealistic movements
One famous tapestry “Peacock and Dragon” was designed by William Morris and woven in 1878. It is (2895 x 2505mm) and was created from natural dyes in a palette of eight colors. Greens, reds, and blues were woven together to form a horizontal band of colors with the blue peacocks as the point of focus. The tapestry shows twisting, serpent-like dragons, arching peacocks, stylized flowers, and curved foliage in a striking and ordered design that is typical for the Arts and Crafts movement. ("Textile conservation." N.d.) Because of its use of nature themes, simplicity, and harmony this was and still is considered beautiful by artists.
The “Straw berry Thief” is known as one of William Morris’s best-known designs. The design was created in 1875 but it first came into print in 1881. (Strawberry Thief , n.d.) Morris got the idea for this design while watching birds from his kitchen garden steal his strawberries. He used an ancient technique called indigo discharge method that was used for centuries in the East. This was the first design in which he used alizarin dye for the color red and weld for the color yellow. He admired this style for its depth of color and crispness of detail. (Strawberry Thief , n.d.) This cotton textile was used as decoration to be used as a curtain or draped across walls and furniture. Many clients thought this piece was beautiful and wanted choose to decorate their homes with it.
“A view of Ornans”. Painted by Corbet in the mid- 1850’s it shows the landscape of Ornans which was the artists native town. The colors are very soft and muted as if he was painting this scene on a cloudy day. He did not use a dramatic colorful palette but used instead soft yellows, fern greens, and light blues. This painting shows a dirt path that leads steeply downward to pass underneath a bridge to the water at the end of the road which was probably the focal point. The bridge is known to be from the town of Scey-en-Varais and the cliff in the distance as the Roche du Mont. Beyond in the background can be seen a church steeple and a quaint village hidden among tall trees. This painting is very typical for the Realist movement as it was not painted using the typical scale and layout of more classical art. Corbet painted the landscape realistically with all of its little beauties and flaws.
This piece “Ladies of the Village” also by Corbet is famous for depicting what he thought was beautiful reality. Created in 1852 this oil on canvas painting shows three woman dressed in country clothes in pastel colors. One of the ladies is handing something to a poor peasant girl while the other ladies look around them. Next to one of the ladies is a small dog that is looking at the straggly cows in the distance. The colors in this painting are not the most vivid and neither is the landscape especially dramatic or inspiring.
Many critics were displeased by this painting since they said it lacked unity and the traditional scale and perspective of traditional art at that time. Corbet however did not want to paint theatrical expressions and dreamy landscapes, he wanted to paint reality. From the personal perspective of Corbet and other Realist artists “Ladies of the Village” was considered a beautiful and inspiring work of art.

“The Revolt”. Here we can really see how Lingui Russolo wanted to show the beauty in struggle. The painting was created with shades of black, green and primal colors. It depicts a city at night bursting with protesting citizens. Their faces are illuminated by the unnatural glow of electric street lamps. (Telegraph, n.d) It focuses on the struggle and energy of the crowd as they march forward in a seemingly unstoppable mass.

The people in the front are clear enough to see their hands and fists raised in protest and their bent knees as they climb upward. The rest of the crowd however is blurred and is cut off by the end of the page making it seem like there are an unfathomable crowd of people about to march on the page. Its energy and heaviness of motion along with its simple shapes and aggressive tones are what makes it an almost cliché example of beautiful Futurist art.
Futuristic art is known for trying to capture not just a single pose or gesture but the entire event of the action itself. Marcel Duchamp’s “Nude Descending the Staircase” is a great example of showing implied motion. Instead of showing the woman posing on a bed or couch as artists in the past would have done, Duchamp painted her to show her moving around. ("Futurism" Home, n.d.) She is shown descending the staircase not just for an isolated moment in time in all her movements. ("Futurism" Home, n.d.) It shows a blur of sepia color tones and reduces the woman to abstract forms that extenuates the confusion and blur of her movements. Created in 1912 this artwork was representational of what artists from the Futurist movement considered to be beautiful.
Created in 1937, “The Barbarians” is one among in a series of paintings from the French Max Ernst. He was one of the most enthusiastic members of the Surrealist movement and later became one of its founding members. His paintings were also influenced by Sigmund Freud and ideas about the mysterious and subconscious. Many of his works dealt with birds or representations of wild animals. Art critic John Russel wrote that the creatures were expressions of the fear Ernst felt about World War 11. (Max Ernst: The Barbarians, n.d.)
This painting shows two gigantic bird like creatures marching over the landscape. They are so huge and ominous that the hills and possible village in the background are barely visible. The immenseness of the creatures can be felt as they were painted next what looks like a tall sheer cliff and beneath the creatures legs and is tiny woman who is holding up some sort of undefined winged being. (Max Ernst: The Barbarians, n.d.) Attached to one of the creature’s arms is a strange being that looks like it has a shell and is sticking out its tongue.
The creatures were painted using dark and rich colors in green, red and black to create shadowy forms. They also have patterns of them that look like fossil or geological formations. This was a technique called grattage scraping. The artist would paint on a canvas and press small objects into the wet pain. This would leave an imprints in the paint. (Max Ernst: The Barbarians, n.d.)

Created in 1937, “The Barbarians” is one among in a series of paintings from the French Max Ernst. He was one of the most enthusiastic members of the Surrealist movement and later became one of its founding members. His paintings were also influenced by Sigmund Freud and ideas about the mysterious and subconscious. Many of his works dealt with birds or representations of wild animals. Art critic John Russel wrote that the creatures were expressions of the fear Ernst felt about World War 11. (Max Ernst: The Barbarians, n.d.)
This painting shows two gigantic bird like creatures marching over the landscape. They are so huge and ominous that the hills and possible village in the background are barely visible. The immenseness of the creatures can be felt as they were painted next what looks like a tall sheer cliff and beneath the creatures legs and is tiny woman who is holding up some sort of undefined winged being. (Max Ernst: The Barbarians, n.d.) Attached to one of the creature’s arms is a strange being that looks like it has a shell and is sticking out its tongue.
The creatures were painted using dark and rich colors in green, red and black to create shadowy forms. They also have patterns of them that look like fossil or geological formations. This was a technique called grattage scraping. The artist would paint on a canvas and press small objects into the wet pain. This would leave an imprints in the paint. (Max Ernst: The Barbarians, n.d.)

Hope you enjoyed our exhibts!
Group 4:
Kristen- Art Deco Vs Modern Art
Yvette- Fashion Vs Art
Hannah- Arts and Crafts, Realistic, Futuristic and Surrealistic Movements

Tamara de Lempicka, "The Musician" (1929) oil on canvas 161x96cm
Considered to be the icon of Art Deco, Tamara de Lempicka was distinct in her art. Her distinctive and bold artistic style developed quickly and epitomized the cool yet sensual side of the Art Deco movement. For her, Picasso "embodied the novelty of destruction". She thought that many of the Impressionists drew badly and employed "dirty" colors. De Lempicka's technique is clean, precise, and elegant. She employs sharp lines, bold colors and sharp contrast. Emotion fuels her work.
Costume design for Salome, 1917
Aleksandra Ekster (1882-1949) was one of the brightest figures of so called "new Russian painting" of the early 20th century. She also became known as a brilliant scene painter for her sets for many ballet and opera productions, especially in the Kamerny. She uses uses chunks of block shape to create the illusion of a dancer. She also uses the same strong lines and bold colors that are dominamt in the Art Deco and Modern Art era.
Rockefeller Center was originally intended to house the new Metropolitan Opera house, but when they backed out in 1931, John D. Rockefeller scrambled for a new vision for Rockefeller Center. The result was a complex that was overwhelmed with Art Deco from its architecture as well as its art. Here the GE Building displays all the key aspects of art deco. This piece by Lee Lawrie depicts "Wisdom". He creates this sculpture with the use of sharp lines and great contrast that strikes the eye.
Lee Lawrie; "Wisdom"
Vogue Red Blocks cup and saucer, Eric Slater, 1930-1931
This cup and saucer is in the 'Vogue' shape donning the 'Red Blocks' pattern. It was designed in 1930 by Eric Slater. This 'Vogue' shape, is very modern and made from fine high quality bone china. The shape was well-matched for a range of dynamic Art Deco patterns. Despite the appearance of Vogue, some customers criticized the wide-mouthed cups for allowing drinks to cool off too quickly, and complained that they could not put a finger through the solid handle, or hang the cup by the handle for storage. This made this piece more for show than practicality.
Like many of his predecessors, Leopold Survage understood abstract art as a challenge to the character of traditional art. “An immobile abstract form does not do much of anything,” he stated. Survage prepared multiple works of abstract watercolors in his attempt to animate his works. In his works he was also determined to create an abstract color film. Even though during his era, this was outside of the technology available, he still devoted himself to the mission. He never accomplished a film. Even so, the distinct structures of his watercolors, with each image imagined as one frame in a continuous animation, allowed for the creation of rhythm within his work and gave continuity to each piece.
Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925
Leopold Survage
Gino Severini (Italian, 1883–1966)
"Dancer" 1912
Italian painter, mosaicist, and stage designer, Gino Severini was an important link between French and Italian art. Although his most historically significant works were produced before World War I, he had a long career during which he continued to evolve his style, particularly in abstract schemes. His use of soft colors and bold lines linked his work to the abstract era.
Paul Signac (French, 1863–1935)
"Albenga" 1896
French painter Paul Signac, was one of the leading artists of Neo-Impressionism, the era of painters that followed the Impressionists. The extraordinary quality and quantity of his artistic work, which included oils, watercolors, etchings, lithographs, and pen-and-ink, was matched by the vast knowledge of his interests as a writer and, toward the end of his life, his deep opposition to fascism.
Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack (German, 1893–1965)
"Abstract Composition" 1921
Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack used bold abstract shapes to portray his message. Sharp lines are expressed through the use of bold colors to show contrast and diversity. Other forms of his work were created by compiling little pieces of paper to compose an abstract form of art.
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