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Propaganda

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by

Meghan Cassidy

on 22 January 2015

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Transcript of Propaganda

The U.S. used propaganda to portray the opposing side as evil
General Message of Propaganda
Political
Cartoon

What is Propaganda:
Fear Propaganda:
Bandwagon and Name-calling
Propaganda:
using propaganda to influence the public views by giving out false information to create fear in the public
The technique of encouraging people to think or act in some way simply because other people are doing so.
Advertisement to persuade a group of people in order for them to help out with a certain cause, such as a war or helping the poor.

The usually expressed propaganda in a biased or misleading nature in order to convince the people more.
Propaganda
By Jacob, Josh, and Meghan
Kinds of Propaganda:
The U.S. often used woman and children in posters to persuade people
Political cartoons were also very popular
Some kinds of propaganda that was used were fear, the bandwagon, name-calling, euphemism, glittering generalities, transfer, and testimonial.
To get people fired up
General Message of Propaganda:
They also tended to criticize the enemy they were fighting against.
"Every Citizen a Soldier: World War II Posters on the American Home Front."Every Citizen a Soldier: World War II Posters on the American Home Front. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Jan. 2015.
"Propaganda posters at a glance:." The National WWII Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Jan. 2015.
"Propaganda Techniques."Propaganda techniques. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2015.
"Google." Google. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2015.
"The Thrifty Pig | 1941 | WW2 Anti-Nazi Animated Propaganda Short Film by Walt Disney | WWII Cartoon." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2015.
Sources
MLA Format
TheBestFilmArchives. “The Thrifty Pig,m 1941, WW2 Anti-Nazi Animated Propaganda Short Film by Walt Disney, WWII Cartoon”. Youtube. Youtube, Dec 24, 2013. Web. 15 Jan. 2015.
L. Bird Jr, William and Rubenstein, Harry. “Every Citizen a soldier: World War II Posters on the American Home Front.” Gilder Lehrman. Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, 2009. Web. 19 Jan. 2015.
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