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Ancient Inuit Fishing

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by

Caleb Blumenshine

on 28 February 2014

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Transcript of Ancient Inuit Fishing

Nets
Spears
Inuits often used spears to fish.
The most common types of spears were the three-pronged spears, and the kokiwog spears. Three-pronged spears are pretty self explanatory, they have the heads. Each of the three heads are extremely sharp and strong. Inuits would wait by the ice hole or shore and jab the spear into the water when a fish comes by.
Spears 2
Fish
Ancient Inuit Fishing
Inuits ate fish, it was a very important part of their diet. Here are some of the fish that they ate: King Salmon, Sockeye Salmon, Pink Salmon, Chum Salmon, Arctic Grayling, Silver Salmon, Steelhead, Rainbow Trout, Dolly Varden, and Halibut.
The kokiwog spear is used the same way as the three-pronged spear. Kokiwog spears have two prongs with one inward-facing blade on each prong. The Inuits make them like this so that the prongs go on the outside of the fish, making the blades cut into it, but not out. Spears were made of whale bone to substitute for wood.
Most of the time, Inuit nets were made of sinew and thin strips of leather. The nets were often weighed down by stones or rocks, and kept afloat by inflated seal bladders. The bigger the weave of the net were usually meant for catching fish. Smaller weave means that it was made for skimming for krill.
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By Caleb Blumenshine
Full transcript