Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Copy of The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make

No description
by

daniel Musselwhite

on 1 May 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Copy of The 6 Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make

The
6
Most Important Decisions You'll Ever Make

By: Sean Covey
Summary
This book written by Sean Covey is a guide for teens to survive. It gives teens advice on how to make smart decisions with issues such as school, dating, parents, friends, and addictions. Covey addresses topics that are life changing and can affect a teen's entire future. With his own personal experiences and stories from other teens, he adventures into the world of helping teens to thrive.
Decision 1: School
It is important to stick school out even if it gets hard. It is better to finish school because most jobs require at the least a high school diploma and the jobs that don't are low paying. It is also important to ask questions and not procrastinate. 7 secrets to getting good grades are Believe you can, Show up, Do extra-credit, Get on your teachers good side, Be strong in the red zone, Gather your resources, and develop smart study habits.
Decision 2: Friends
Choose friends that build you up, be a true friend, and stand up to peer pressure. Never center your life on friends because they can change, and choose friends who like you for who your are and not what you have. Do not try to be popular, just be yourself. Here are four red flags that suggest you may need new friends: If you have to change your clothes, language, friends, or standards in order to keep your friends; if you're doing stuff you don't feel good about like stealing, fighting, or drugs; if you feel like you are being used; if your life feels out of control.
Decision 3: Parents
First you must recognize how hard raising a child is. Showing your parents respect is key to earning their trust and having a good relationship. Shower them with love so they will know they are appreciated. If your parents are stict, they most likely just really care about you. Think about it like this, it is better to have parents that are overprotective, than parents that don't care at all.
Decision 4: Dating and Sex
The high road is to date intelligently, treat sex as a big deal, and wait for true love and commitment. When dating, expect a lot of drama, pickiness, and indecisiveness. If you have never been asked out, consider yourself lucky you haven't had to deal with all the drama. Our society has created two rules that we tend to believe: having a girlfriend or boyfriend is the only way to be happy, and the more you like someone the more physical you have to get. Any first signs of an abusive relationship such as name calling, a slap, or a push, is your cue to get out before you are stuck. The biggest mistake teens make in relationships is to become boyfriend/girlfriend centered.
Decision 4: Dating and Sex
Contrary to popular belief, the majority of teens aren't having sex. Only about half are. Each year, one in four sexually active teens get an STD. Oral sex carries the risk of contracting diseases also. About half of teens who had sex wished they would have waited. Treat sex like its a big deal , wait for love and commitment.
Decision 5: Addictions
There can be good and bad addictions. Some include tobacco, alcohol, illegal drugs, prescription drugs, food, sleeping, eating disorders, overspending, compulsive disorders, TV, video games, Internet surfing, sex, pornography, card games, gambling, or self-mutilation. Addiction can become stronger than you. They affect everyone around you. Most substance abuse problems start with tobacco, marijuana, and alcohol. To avoid addictions engulf yourself in exercise, sports, music, service, hobbies, learning, family, friends, or journal writing instead.
Decision 6: Self-Worth
"Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate. It is our light, not darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves "Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, handsome, talented, and fabulous?" Actually, who are you not to be?"
-Marianne Williamson
There are two mirrors two choose from. The social mirror and the true mirror. The social mirror is external and based on how you are compared to others. The true mirror is internal and based on your potential and personal best. The social mirror is unrealistic, so you should look at your true mirror. The foundation stones of good character are integrity, service, and faith. Focus on what you can control, look at the true mirror, and don't lose hope.
Author's
Purpose
Sean Covey wants to prepare teens to handle the pressure of life and be successful. This is a guide to lead teens in the right direction, towards a better future. He breaks it down and puts it plain for teens to understand and connect.
Connection
The section on self worth stood out for me. I loved the concept of a true mirror and a social mirror because I often compare my internal characteristics to other people's external characteristics. This book also motivated me to stick with my morals and values, despite what everyone else is doing. This book is amazing for teens and I would recomend it to anyone.
By: Mariah Fleming
Full transcript