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Multitasking: Brain Drain or Boost in Efficiency?

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by

Amelia Lugo

on 4 January 2013

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Transcript of Multitasking: Brain Drain or Boost in Efficiency?

Multitasking: Brain Drain or Boost Efficiency? Data Hypothesis:
The goal of this project is to investigate the question: Can people really pay attention to two things at once? Purpose:
To show that people can do two things at the same time. Procedures: Material: 1) Two simple Math test with similar problems each should take about 10 minutes to complete.
2) Portable music player with head set 4 each volunteer
3) watch or timer
4) Room or area with tables and chairs for each volunteer to take the test
5) Notepads
6) Pens/pencils
7) At least 7 volunteers for your study(the more the better) 1) Recruit your volunteers and let them know the date and time of the experiment.
2. Remind them to bring their music players with a head set.
3. Prepare two simple math tests using addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division. Each test should take about 10 minutes to complete, should be equally challenging, and have the same number of problems. Make enough copies so that every person has his/her own copy of each test to write on. 6. When everyone if finished with the first test, reverse the groups so now those volunteers who took the "quiet" test can listen to their music players and vice versa. Hand out the second version of the math test and give the groups the same amount of time to take the test as you did the first time. Again, record the start and stop times of each volunteer (or have each volunteer record their start and finish times on the test).
7. Ask your volunteers to write down how they felt they did on the first test versus the second test. 4. The day of the test, explain briefly to the volunteers what they will be doing. Tell them they should not feel rushed since you will be giving them plenty of time to finish. You should note the start and finish times of each volunteer (or have each volunteer record their start and finish times on the test).
5. Ask half your volunteers to take the first test without their music players on, and the other half should take the same test while listening to their favorite tunes. Each person can pick their own music to listen to during the test. Tip: instruct your volunteers to keep the headphone volume low enough so that others can't hear their music. Results:
The Results of the Data is that 4 out of 6 volunteers can not work well with music. Conclusion: The conclusion is that not many people can multitask. Data 1
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6 Second Trial First Trial 6:30-6:45 6:30-6:50 6:30-6:45 6:30-6:55 6:30-6:50 6:30-6:55 With Music With Music With Music Without Music Without Music Without Music Without Music Without Music Without Music With Music With Music With Music Work better with music Work better with music Work better without
music Work better without
music Work better without
music Work better without
music Volunteers
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