Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

War-Time Surgical Tools used in Medieval Times

No description
by

Monica Kotz

on 20 October 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of War-Time Surgical Tools used in Medieval Times

Surgical Tools Used in War During the Medieval Period Main Tools 1) Bone Cutter
2) Cauterizer
3) Arrow Puller Bone Cutter Amputation Knife Bone Saw This curved knife was used to cut into the skin and muscle in a circular manner to allow access to the bone. After exposing the bone, a saw would be used to detach the injured part of the ligament from the healthy counterpart. These three different tips were used for maximum penetration and the ability to seal off different types of wounds. Rounded Tip Arrow-head Tip Diamond Tip Cauterizer Arrow Puller The round barrel of this instrument was put around the base of the arrow, while the sharp scissor-like prongs would cut the skin back in order to allow for a clean removal. Why These Tools? The majority of battle- field wounds were caused by: Sword or knife flesh wounds Arrow piercing the skin on impact Horse or blunt object impact How These Tools have Effected Surgical
Technology Today A hand-held cauterizer Bone Cutter Although arrow pullers have become obsolete, there have been advancements made on bone cutters and cauterizing tools. The new improvments on cauterizers has allowed them to be more accurate and improvements on the bone cutter ensures a cleaner removal. In conclusion: Medieval medical tools were an important asset on the battle field as well as a crucial starting point for many of the instuments we use in today's emergency and operating rooms. These include: 1) Bone Cutters
2) Cauterizers
3)Arrow Pullers MLA Sources "20 scary surgical tools from the past." Photograph. A Blog About History. Sevaan Franks. 2009. Web. 2 Oct 2011. <http://www.ablogabouthistory.com/2009/07/03/20-scary-surgical-tools-from-the-past/>. "Medieval Surgery." Photograph. Knights In Battle. John Barber. 2011. Web. 2 Oct 2011. <http://www.knightsinbattle.com/index.htm>. Pictures: "Gallery." Photograph. Discovering Medieval. Martin Scott-Jupp. Web. 2 Oct 2011. <http://www.discoveringmedieval.co.uk/Gallery.htm>. "Bone Cutter." Photograph. Sirag Surgicals. Web. 2 Oct 2011. <http://siragsurgicals.in/sirag/contact.php>. "Small Vessel Cauterizer Kit." Photograph. Fine Science Tools. 2011. Web. 2 Oct 2011. <http://www.finescience.com/Quick-Order.asp&xgt;. MLA Sources Information: Kelly, Kate. The History of Medicine: The Middle Ages. 1st ed. New York: Facts on File Inc., 2009. 53-65. eBook. <http://www.scribd.com/doc/55664429/the-History-of-Medicine-the-Middle-Ages-500-1450>. Burns, Robert. "The Medieval Crossbow as Surgical Instrument: An Illustrated Case History." Bulletin of the New Your Academy of Medicine. 48.8 (1972): 984-988. Web. 4 Oct. 2011. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1806844/pdf/bullnyacadmed00198-0005.pdf>. Glick, Thomas. "Instruments, Medicine." Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine: an Encyclopedia . 1st ed. Florence: Psychology Press, 2005. Web. <http://books.google.com/books?id=SaJlbWK_-FcC&pg=PA271&lpg=PA271&dq=medieval surgical tools&source=bl&ots=7lfkSqR93D&sig=Xzw9v42NUw58QIhzR57aC4yAfFU&hl=en&ei=yxqLTu7gG86ctwea_eWtAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&r>. Kirkpatrick, James J. R., and Ian L. Naylor. "The Qualities and Conduct of an English Surgeon in 1446: As Described in a Manuscript Attributed to Thomas Morstede." Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 79.3 (1997): 225-228. Nuland, Sherwin B. "The Past Is Prologue: Surgeons Then and Now." Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 186.4 (1998): 457-465.
Full transcript