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LA9 Poetry Terms

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by

Casandra Schlangen

on 9 February 2016

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Transcript of LA9 Poetry Terms

DREAMS
Langston Hughes
Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.

Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow.

QUATRAIN
a four-line stanza
COUPLET
a group of two consecutive lines that rhyme
METAPHOR
a comparison between two unlike things without using the words
like, as, than, or resembles
a comparison between two unlike things using the words
like, as, than, or resembles
SIMILE
PERSONIFICATION
a kind of metaphor in which
a nonhuman thing is talked about as if it were human
ALLUSION
a reference to a person, place, or an event from history, literature, mythology, pop culture, etc.
SOLILOQUY
a long speech in which a character voices his/her feelings aloud
PUN
a joke involving two words that sound alike but have different meanings
ALLITERATION
the repetition of the consonant sounds at the beginning of two or more words
Do you know your literature?
Do you know your pop culture?
In Shakespeare's play, Julius Ceasar, a man named Brutus helps to kill Ceasar. As Ceasar lies dying, he can't believe he's been betrayed by a good man. He looks at Brutus and says, "Et tu, Brute?" What he means is, "And you, Brutus?"
In 1989 Disney released the animated film, "The Little Mermaid." One of the main characters was a crab named Sebastian.
From 1989 to 1994, Arsenio Hall hosted a night-time talk show called "The Arsenio Hall Show." He is known for greeting his audience by fist pumping and chanting "Whoo, Whoo, Whoo!"
THIS IS WILLIAM WORDSWORTH.
HE'S A POET FROM THE 1800s.
THIS IS FROM ONE OF HIS POEMS.
IT HAS TWO COUPLETS.
NIGHTINGALE! thou surely
art
A creature of a "fiery
heart":
--

These notes of thine--they pierce and
pierce;
Tumultuous harmony and
fierce!
THIS IS WILLIAM BLAKE.
HE'S A POET FROM THE 1700s.
THIS IS FROM ONE OF HIS POEMS.
IT IS A QUATRAIN.
Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
THIS IS JOYCE SCARBROUGH.
SHE'S A MODERN POET.
THIS IS FROM ONE OF HER POEMS.
IT CONTAINS A METAPHOR.
My
thoughts
of you
are
the
waves
They are countless and appear constantly
To splash onto the shore of my mind
THIS IS ROBERT BURNS.
HE'S A POET FROM THE 1700s.
THIS IS FROM ONE OF HIS POEMS.
IT CONTAINS TWO SIMILES.
O
My Love’s like a red, red rose
,
That’s newly sprung in June;
O
My Love’s like the melody
That’s sweetly played in tune.
THIS IS A CLIP FROM THE DISNEY MOVIE ALADDIN.
THE FIRST MINUTE CONTAINS THREE ALLUSIONS.
THIS IS JAMES STEPHENS.
HE'S A POET FROM THE EARLY 1900s.
THIS IS FROM ONE OF HIS POEMS.
IT CONTAINS A METAPHOR THAT IS AN EXAMPLE OF PERSONIFICATION.
The wind
stood up
and
gave a shout
.
He
whistled on his fingers
and

Kicked
the withered leaves about
And
thumped the branches with his hand

And
said he'd kill
and kill and kill,
And so he will! And so he will!
LAFFY TAFFY CANDIES USE PUNS FOR MANY OF THEIR JOKES
IN A SOLILOQUY, A CHARACTER IS BASICALLY THINKING OUT LOUD.

IF THEY THOUGHT TO THEMSELVES, THE AUDIENCE WOULD JUST BE WATCHING THEM STARE SILENTLY.

THIS HELPS US KNOW HOW THEY ARE FEELING ABOUT THEMSELVES AND OTHERS.
THIS IS EDGAR ALLAN POE.
HE'S A POET AND AUTHOR FROM THE MID-1800s.
THIS IS FROM ONE OF HIS POEMS.
IT CONTAINS SEVERAL EXAMPLES OF ALLITERATION.
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered
weak
and
weary,
Over many a
quaint
and
curious
volume of forgotten lore,
While I
nodded,

nearly

napping,
suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
A CLIP FROM THE FILM
V FOR VENDETTA
ASIDE
a comment in which a character addresses certain characters out of many on stage or the audience
THIS WOMAN HAS SOMETHING TO SAY TO HER FRIEND, BUT SHE DOESN'T WANT OTHERS TO HEAR.

EVEN THOUGH IT SEEMS SHE'S WHISPERING, SHE STILL HAS TO SPEAK LOUD ENOUGH FOR THE AUDIENCE TO HEAR HER SECRET.
MONOLOGUE
a speech in which a speaker addresses one or more silent listeners
OXYMORON
the pairing of words that are opposite or contradictory to make a phrase
PICK YOUR FAVORITE OXYMORON:
alone together
pretty ugly
jumbo shrimp
pure evil
A CLIP FROM THE FILM
RENAISSANCE MAN
unbiased opinion
small crowd
beautiful disaster
crazy normal
awfully good
icy hot
little giant
loud whisper
What kind of bear has no teeth?
A gummy bear!
How do you get a peanut to laugh?
You crack it up.
Why didn't the teddy bear finish his supper?
Because he was already stuffed.
When does it rain money?
When there is change in the weather.
What are the strongest days of the week?
Saturday and Sunday. Every other day is a weekday.
Why was the tomato blushing?
Because she saw the salad dressing!
What do you call a cow with no legs?
Ground beef.
How do you fix a broken
Jack-O-Lantern?
You use a pumpkin patch.
A CLIP FROM THE MOVIE
ROCKY
DRAMATIC
IRONY
when the audience or reader knows something important that the character in the play does not
DRAMATIC IRONY IS MEANT TO MAKE THE AUDIENCE FEEL UNCOMFORTABLE OR NERVOUS ABOUT A SITUATION.

SOMETIMES THE OUTCOME OF THE SITUATION IS HUMOROUS AND SOMETIMES IT IS TRAGIC.
STOP HERE!



MORE NOTES FOR LATER.
STANZA
a group of lines in a poem
THIS IS MAYA ANGELOU.
SHE'S A FAMOUS AMERICAN POET AND AUTHOR. THIS SECTION OF HER POEM HAS 3 STANZAS.
You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may tread me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I'll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
'Cause I walk like I've got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I'll rise.
IMAGERY
descriptive language that appeals to the senses (sight, sound, touch, taste and smell)
THIS IS JOHN KEATS.
HE'S A POET FROM THE EARLY 1800s.
THIS IS FROM ONE OF HIS POEMS.
IT CONTAINS MANY EXAMPLES OF AUDITORY IMAGERY (SENSE OF SOUND).
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown
lambs loud bleat
from hilly bourn;
Hedge-
crickets sing
; and now with
treble soft
The
redbreast

whistles
from a garden-croft,
And gathering
swallows

twitter
in the skies
the pattern of beats, or stresses, in a line of poetry
METER
THIS IS EDWARD LEAR.
HE'S A POET FROM THE 1800s.
HE IS FAMOUS FOR WRITING LIMERICKS - METERED POEMS.
There was an old person of Dutton,
Whose head was as small as a button;
So to make it look big he purchased a wig,
And rapidly rushed about Dutton.
the use of rhyming words at the end of lines
END RHYME
THIS IS VIRGINIA HAMILTON ADAIR. SHE'S AN AMERICAN POET FROM THE 1960s AND 70s.
THIS PART OF HER POEM USES END RHYMES.
And here on this turning of the
stair
Between passion and
doubt
,
I pause and say a double
prayer
,
One for you, and one for you;
And so they cancel
out
.
the use of rhyming words within a line
INTERNAL RHYME
THIS IS SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE.
HE'S A POET FROM THE 1800s.
THIS PART OF HIS POEM USES INTERNAL RHYMES.
The ship was
cheer’d
, the harbor
clear’d
,
And every
day
, for food or
play
,
In mist or
cloud
, on mast or
shroud
,..
Whiles all the
night
, through fog-smoke
white
,
Glimmer’d the white moonshine.….
poetry with no rhyme scheme or regular rhythm
FREE VERSE
THIS IS WALT WHITMAN.
HE'S AN AMERICAN POET FROM THE 1800s.
THIS PART OF HIS POEM IS FREE VERSE.
A noiseless patient spider,
I mark’d where on a little promontory it stood isolated,
Mark’d how to explore the vacant vast surrounding,
It launch’d forth filament, filament, filament, out of itself,
Ever unreeling them, ever tirelessly speeding them.
Full transcript