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RH Reinforced Composites

The Effects of Fibre and Compatibiliser Loadings on tensile and Impact Properties of RH/PE Composites
by

Richard Lin

on 15 October 2014

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Transcript of RH Reinforced Composites

Failure Mechanism
Fibre Debonding
16
~270%
~16%
14
Mechanical Property
Properties of Raw Materials
10
Mechanical tests:
Tensile (ASTM D638)
Impact (ASTM D6110)
Experimental Details
To
manufacture
and
evaluate
the
mechanical
properties of rice husk reinforced thermoplastic composites
Objectives
Presentation Overview
Introduction

Objectives

Experimental Details

Results

Conclusions

Higher Education Commission (HEC) Scholarship, Pakistan

Postgraduate Research Student Support (PReSS) Account, the University of Auckland
Acknowledgements
With an increase in RH loading, tensile properties of composites were increased, whereas Charpy impact strength was decreased.
Conclusions
~32%
Effect of Fibre Loadings
Physical tests:
Water Absorption
Thickness Swelling
Morphology: Scanning electron microscopy
Experimental Details
Matrix
: Medium density polyethylene (MDPE, ICO Polymers NZ, melt flow index - 6 g/10min)
Compatibiliser
: Maleic anhydrated polyethylene (MAPE, DuPont™ Fusabond®) – 1, 3 and 6 wt%
Reinforcement
: RRH – 15, 30, and 50 wt%
Sample fabrication
:
Extrusion:
co-rotating twin screw extruder
, screw speed -
50 rpm
, feeder speed -
1.1 rpm
. The temperature profile (different heating zones and die) -
170, 175, 180 and 185 °C
.
Pelletising then injection moulding
9
Experimental Details
Rice Husk (cont.)
http://faostat.fao.org/site/567/DesktopDefault.aspx?PageID=567#ancor
Fuel
Fertiliser
Animal bedding
Landfilling
S. Taj, M. A. Munawar, and S. Khan, "Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composites," Proceedings-Pakistan Academy of Sciences, vol. 44, p. 129, 2007.
Outer covering of the rice grain
Rice Husk
Natural fibres:
Harvested/extracted:
sisal, flax, hemp, jute, straws, wood, kenaf, coir, raphia and banana fibre
Introduction
The Effects of Fibre and Compatibiliser Loadings on Tensile and Impact Properties of Rice Husk/Polyethylene Composites

13
Outer surface
Inner surface
RRH: Source - Pakistan
Experimental Details
70%
Indonesia (66 million tons)
Vietnam (39 million tons)
China (197 million tons)
India (120 million tons)
Bangladesh (49 million tons)
Annual production: approximately 670 million tons/year
~50%
~3%
Effects of Compatibiliser Loadings
A. Bilal,
Richard J.T. Lin
and K. Jayaraman
Source of primary food for over 40% of world population
Major rice growing countries are:
Centre for Advanced Composite Materials (CACM)
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Auckland, New Zealand
Agricultural wastes:
rice husk (RH)
, wheat husk, and their straw, bagasse and corn stalks
Agricultural wastes:
rice husk (RH)
China (197 million tons)
India (120 million tons)
Indonesia (66 million tons)
Vietnam (39 million tons)
Bangladesh (49 million tons)
Agro-waste by-product from milling of rice
Accounts for 20-22% weight of the rice paddy
Annual yield of 130 million tons
Major portion is disposed off
To investigate the
effects
of
fibre
and
compatibiliser
loadings on
tensile
and
impact
properties of RH/LMDPE composites
~ 6 mm
Cellulose (35 wt%); Hemicellulose (25 wt%); and Lignin (20 wt%)
~300%
~32%
Fibre Poll Out
Crazing of Polymer
The increase in the tensile strength is attributed to a better stress transfer between RH and LMDPE at higher RH loadings, whereas, the increase in the tensile modulus is attributed to the stiffening effect created by incorporation of RH in LMDPE.
The loss of impact strength with the increase in RH loading as the composites got brittle and were easy to crack.
The incorporation of MAPE increased tensile strength and Charpy impact strength due to better fibre matrix adhesion within the composites.
The best properties were achieved with 3 wt% of MAPE loading as the strength started to decrease with further increase of MAPE due to the lower molecular weight of MAPE as compared to LMDPE resulting in plasticising effect.
The incorporation of RH and MAPE in the composites properly can improve overall mechanical properties of the RH/LMDPE composites.
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