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LI-FI Technology

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Akshay Prasad

on 24 June 2014

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Transcript of LI-FI Technology

LI-FI Technology
What is Li-Fi
Li-Fi, or "light fidelity", is a technology, that can be a complement of RF communication (Wi-Fi or Cellular network), or a replacement in contexts of data broadcasting. Li-Fi, like Wi-Fi, is the high speed, bidirectional and fully networked subset of visible light communications (VLC). It is wireless and uses visible light communication (instead of radio frequency waves), which carries much more information, and has been proposed as a solution to the RF-bandwidth limitations
5G Communication
It is a 5G visible light communication system that uses light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a medium to deliver networked, mobile, high-speed communication in a similar manner as Wi-Fi. Li-Fi could lead to the Internet of Things, which is everything electronic being connected to the internet, with the LED lights on the electronics being used as Li-Fi internet access points.
V
isible
L
ight
C
ommunications(
VLC
)
Visible light communications (VLC)
works by switching bulbs on and off within nanoseconds,[6] which is too quickly to be noticed by the human eye. Although Li-Fi bulbs would have to be kept on to transmit data, the bulbs could be dimmed to the point that they were not visible to humans and yet still functional.[7] The light waves cannot penetrate walls which makes a much shorter range, though more secure from hacking, relative to Wi-Fi.[8][9] Direct line of sight isn't necessary for Li-Fi to transmit signal and light reflected off of the walls can achieve 70 Mbit/s
Advantages
Li-Fi has the advantage of being able to be used in electromagnetic sensitive areas such as in aircraft cabins, hospitals and nuclear power plants[citation needed] without causing electromagnetic interference. Both Wi-Fi and Li-Fi transmit data over the electromagnetic spectrum, but whereas Wi-Fi utilises radio waves, Li-Fi uses visible light. While the US Federal Communications Commission has warned of a potential spectrum crisis because Wi-Fi is close to full capacity, Li-Fi has almost no limitations on capacity.
HISTORY
Professor Harald Haas, from the University of Edinburgh in the UK, is widely recognised as the original founder of Li-Fi. He coined the term Li-Fi and is Chair of Mobile Communications at the University of Edinburgh and co-founder of pureLiFi.
The general term visible light communication (VLC), includes any use of the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to transmit information. The D-Light project at Edinburgh's Institute for Digital Communications was funded from January 2010 to January 2012. Haas promoted this technology in his 2011 TED Global talk and helped start a company to market it. PureLiFi, formerly pureVLC, is an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) firm set up to commercialize Li-Fi products for integration with existing LED-lighting systems.
In October 2011, companies and industry groups formed the Li-Fi Consortium, to promote high-speed optical wireless systems and to overcome the limited amount of radio-based wireless spectrum available by exploiting a completely different part of the electromagnetic spectrum. A number of companies offer uni-directional VLC products which is not the same as Li-Fi.
VLC technology was exhibited in 2012 using Li-Fi. By August 2013, data rates of over 1.6 Gbit/s were demonstrated over a single color LED. In September 2013, a press release said that Li-Fi, or VLC systems in general, do not require line-of-sight conditions. In October 2013, it was reported Chinese manufacturers were working on Li-Fi development kits.
Advantages of LI-FI
10000 times more spectrum than radio waves

Light boxes are already present

Therefore we have the infra structure already installed and available
CAPACITY
EFFICIENCY
Li-Fi can reach transmission speeds of 10Gbit/s i.e. more than 250 times faster than ‘superfast’ broadband.

In comparison to wi-fi routers LED lights consume less energy

Therefore it makes Li-Fi more efficient as compared to Wi-Fi
AVAILABILITY

Light is present everywhere , so we can use Li-Fi anywhere in the world
SECURITY
As Light waves cannot penetrate through walls , they cannot be intercepted as easily as Wi-Fi can and cannot be misused easily
Li-Fi CONSORTIM
The Li-Fi Consortium is an international platform focusing on optical wireless technologies. It was founded by four technology-based organizations in October 2011. The goal of Li-Fi Consortium is to foster the development and distribution of (Li-Fi) optical wireless technologies such as communication, navigation, natural user interfaces and others.
THE IDEA BEHIND Li-Fi
Wi-Fi works by spewing out radio waves in all directions around your home or business from a wireless router. When your wireless device, such as a smartphone, detects the wireless radio waves, it connects to your wireless router, which then connects you to the Internet. The idea behind Li-Fi is almost identical, but instead of wireless radio waves being sent in all directions, it instead sends light shooting out to connect to your smartphone, laptop, or other devices. You wouldn’t even notice, but your LED lights would flicker at high speed, sending data all around your house.
AN EXAMPLE OF LiFi USAGE
Philips lighting company has developed a VLC system for shoppers at stores. They have to download an app on their smartphone and then their smartphone works with the LEDs in the store. The LEDs can pinpoint where they are at in the store and give them corresponding coupons and information based on where aisle they are on and what they are looking at
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