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Social Work and Technology

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Porsh Patt

on 3 November 2014

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Transcript of Social Work and Technology

Documentation and Technology

Parent/teacher/administrative communication
Outside service providers and partner agencies
Case management
Proof of contact with client

HIPPA requires personal security and confidentiality provisions for patients.

An employee or ex-employee can walk by a fax machine and seize documentation containing personal information paving the way for a lawsuit.

Overview of the NASW code of ethics.
-Duty to inform -1.03(e), 1.03 (f)
-Confidentiality -1.07 (l)
-Privacy - 1.07(m)

Supervisor ensures that supervisees adhere to ethical standards and principles.
-Maintain and improve the quality of technology related to social work services.
- Strives to remain current on emerging knowledge relevant social work practice
(e.g facsimile machines, text messaging, social media, and other electronic records).

Supervisors educate on social work competencies.
-review guidelines (best practice) for monitoring and evaluating the uses of technology in service delivery.
-identifying the risk and benefits to the use of technology in the practice collectively with supervisees
-Giving special care with the use of technology as it relates to client’s information.








Ethical principles of social work

NASW Code of Ethics and Standards

Appointments
Intervention (CBT)
Pictures
Safety


Documentation


Age
Phone Disconnections
Boundary issues
Wrong number


Cellphones and text messaging
Conflicts

Hackers
Misunderstanding and conflict
Identity issues
HIPPA violations

Emails and faxes
Conflicts
HIPPA requires personal security and confidentiality provisions for patients.

An employee or ex-employee can walk by a fax machine and seize documentation containing personal information paving the way for a lawsuit.

HIPPA
Policies and Procedure
Standards
Encryption technology
HIPPA Guidelines
Set clear and specific boundaries
Face to face interaction involving serious issues


Documentation and Supervision

Case scenario
Social Media and Technology

LinkedIn
Used as a professional Networking tool
Human Resources and employees alike
Professional Groups
These allows for professional or interdisciplinary collaboration
Examples:
Advance Social Work Practice Network (Social Work specific)
Network for Professionals Working with Vulnerable Children and Adults (Interdisciplinary)

Examples of Use of Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/nami.hamiltoncounty


Technology can move faster than policy
http://socialmediagovernance.com/



Social Media and Technology

5 things to consider before posting to social media, either in your personal life or in your professional capacity

What information do you want to share? Is this information important, harmful, protected, and so forth?
Why do you want to share this information? What are the benefits of sharing? Is there an expected outcome from sharing this information?
Who needs to see this information? After considering the purpose of sharing this information, think about the role of your audience. Who are the people who will benefit or need to know about this information? Will clients see this information?
Where do I want to share this information? After determining who needs to see this information, the question of where to share this information follows. There are various social media tools that may have different or overlapping purposes. Where you share information depends on your answers to the three preceding questions.
How does the NASW Code of Ethics or other organizational policies guide sharing this information? After determining that you are going to share this information, examine and reflect on the NASW Code of Ethics and other policies that may affect the sharing of this information.

(Kimball & Kim, 2013)

Social Media and Technology

Social Media and Technology
1982: Online self-help support groups
1986: “Ask Ezra”
1995: Fee-based Internet mental health services established by Dr. David Sommers
2000: Exponential growth of e-clinics offering online counseling services

The Digital Landscape: In the Beginning …

Welcome to the 21st century!
Online counseling
Telephone counseling
Video counseling
Cyber therapy
Self-guided Web-based interventions
Electronic social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter)
Email
Text messaging
Electronic health records


An Explosion in Services

As of January 2014:
90% of American adults have a cell phone
58% of American adults have a smartphone
32% of American adults own an e-reader
42% of American adults own a tablet or computer



A new way of communicating

Transparency or lack of privacy?


Source: http://cdn.theatlantic.com/newsroom/img/posts/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-18%20at%205.05.59%20PM.png
known as HIPAA

Passed by Congress to promote more standardization and efficiency in the healthcare industry

Four parts: Electronic Transaction and Code Set
Standards; Privacy Rule; Security Rule; National Identifier Requirements


Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (1996)

1996: HIPAA
2003: Privacy Rule established
2005: Security Rule
2009: HITECH (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act)
2013: HITECH Omnibus Rule


Privacy & confidentiality
Disparities: geographical, demographic, socio-economic
Informed consent
Documentation
Conflict of interest



Accessibility
Cost-efficient
Transparency
Quick response
Network sharing
Research
Forum for consultation

Summary: Pushing the boundaries

Pros of technology
Cons of technology
Social Work and Technology
Documentation, social media, ethics, standards

Objectives:
Gain an understanding of:
Social work supervision and leadership in relationship to technology
Documentation and Technology
Social Media and Technology
NASW Code of Ethics and standards and Administration

Garrison, M.E. (2013). The Ethical Challenges of Technology in Social Work: Part One. Power point presentation delivered to the Illinois chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. Retrieved from: http://naswilmeets.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/2NASWConferece2013TheEthicalChallengesofTechnologyinSocialWorkPart1.pptx
Hill, K. (2014). Web 2.0 in social work macro practice: Ethical considerations and questions. Journal of Social Work Values & Ethics, 11(1), 2-11.
Lopez, A. (2014). Social work, technology, and ethical practices: A review and evaluation of the National Association of Social Workers’ Technology Standards. Social Work in Health Care. 53, 815-833. doi: 10.1080/00981389.2014.943454
Morgan, S. (2013). Social workers and the 2013 Omnibus HIPAA rule. (NASW report). Retrieved from NASW website: http://www.socialworkers.org/ldf/legal_issue/2013/mar2013.asp
Nass, S. J., Levit, L.A., Gostin, L.O. (Eds.) (2009). Beyond the HIPAA privacy rule: Enhancing privacy, improving health through research. In Institute of Medicine (U.S.) Committee on Health Research and the Privacy of Health Information: The HIPAA Privacy Rule. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
National Association of Social Workers. (2009). HITECH HIPAA for Social Workers. Retrieved from the NASW website: https://www.socialworkers.org/ldf/legal_issue/2009/200903.asp
Pew Research Internet Project. (2014). Mobile Technology Fact Sheet. Retrieved from Pew Research Center website: http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/mobile-technology-fact-sheet/
Reamer, F. G. (2013). Social work in a digital age: Ethical and risk management challenges. Social Work, 58(2), 163-172.


References

Jasmine is a MSW student interning at an agency that serves recent retirees. In an effort to reduce costs and maintain services, the agency cuts its use of landline telephones and asks workers and students to use their cell phones. Jasmine does not think it is appropriate for the agency to ask students to use their personal cell phones for work purposes.

Still, she agrees because everyone at the agency seems to be complying without raising much of a fuss. One night, around 3 a.m., Jasmine is awakened by her cell phone. She picks it up and sees a text message from a client, Lamar. The message says, “My life is worthless. Nobody cares about me. I’m going to end it all.”

Jasmine feels panic and wonders what to do. If she does not respond, Lamar may commit suicide, and Jasmine will lose any chance to save his life. If she does respond, will she be able to do so in a competent manner, without the benefit of supervision? If she takes time to contact her supervisor for advice, how will her supervisor react to being woken up in the middle of the night? How might the delay in contacting the client affect the risk that Lamar will commit suicide? Jasmine thinks about calling 911, but wonders if she should call Lamar first to see if she can handle the situation without breaching his confidentiality..

Ethical principles are based off social workers core values of service, social justice, dignity and worth of the individual, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence.
-social media relevancy
-clinical picture

Social workers elevate service to others above self interest.
-being technologically uninclined and disinclined.
-Supervisor’s must train “up or out”

Administration understanding the importance of being up to date of new emerging topic’s concerning social media.
-None profit agencies ability to compete with other programs.
-Supervisors as the double agent (e.g. valuing administration needs as well as supervisee’s needs).

Opting not to use Technology
Case Scenario
References
Source: http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/mobile-technology-fact-sheet/

Privacy & confidentiality
Disparities: geographical, demographic, socio-economic
Informed consent
Documentation
Conflict of interest

Cons of technology
Pros of technology
Accessibility
Cost-efficient
Transparency
Quick response
Network sharing
Research
Forum for consultation

Summary: Pushing the boundaries
Presented by: Crystal Anthony, Susan Beaver, Laura Bedinghaus, and LaPorsha HIll
SW 8025 Professor Dianne Carroll, MSW, LISW-S
Facebook
2 concerns for Social Work/Supervisors
Personal Use
Issues include: connecting with clients; personal presentation vs professional; Privacy/confidentiality
Professional Use
Share information about the agency
Discuss/advertise upcoming events
Recognize employee achievements
Share resources

Social Media and Technology: Forms of Social Media

Garrison, M.E. (2013). The Ethical Challenges of Technology in Social Work: Part One. Power point presentation delivered to the Illinois chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. Retrieved from: http://naswilmeets.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/2NASWConferece2013TheEthicalChallengesofTechnologyinSocialWorkPart1.pptx
Hill, K. (2014). Web 2.0 in social work macro practice: Ethical considerations and questions. Journal of Social Work Values & Ethics, 11(1), 2-11.
Lopez, A. (2014). Social work, technology, and ethical practices: A review and evaluation of the National Association of Social Workers’ Technology Standards. Social Work in Health Care. 53, 815-833. doi: 10.1080/00981389.2014.943454
Morgan, S. (2013). Social workers and the 2013 Omnibus HIPAA rule. (NASW report). Retrieved from NASW website: http://www.socialworkers.org/ldf/legal_issue/2013/mar2013.asp
Nass, S. J., Levit, L.A., Gostin, L.O. (Eds.) (2009). Beyond the HIPAA privacy rule: Enhancing privacy, improving health through research. In Institute of Medicine (U.S.) Committee on Health Research and the Privacy of Health Information: The HIPAA Privacy Rule. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
National Association of Social Workers. (2009). HITECH HIPAA for Social Workers. Retrieved from the NASW website: https://www.socialworkers.org/ldf/legal_issue/2009/200903.asp
Pew Research Internet Project. (2014). Mobile Technology Fact Sheet. Retrieved from Pew Research Center website: http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/mobile-technology-fact-sheet/
Reamer, F. G. (2013). Social work in a digital age: Ethical and risk management challenges. Social Work, 58(2), 163-172.
http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/standards/NASWTechnologyStandards.pdf
http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/naswstandards/supervisionstandards2013.pdf
http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/bybeem/SS22/SW%20in%20a%20digital%20age.pdf
http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/EoEMayJun08.shtml
http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/032311p24.shtml
https://socwork.wisc.edu/using-social-media-social-work-student
https://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/advancesinsocialwork/article/viewFile/124/107

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