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Koalas

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by

Emily Fields

on 13 February 2014

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Transcript of Koalas

Koala Reproduction
Females have pouches to raise their young in and males do not.
Females are a few inches smaller than males.
Males have a dark mark on their chest while females do not.
Both genders have very similar appearances, therefore neither gender is considered prettier.
Koalas are dioecious.
Courtship
Male koalas usually attract female koalas by first rubbing their chest on a tree near the female's territory to mark their scent and then making deep, bellowing calls. If females like the sound of the male's voice, they will be attracted. Males then run toward the female and begin mating.
For koalas, fertilization occurs internally.
Development of babies occurs both internally and externally.
Joeys are born after a gestation period of approximately 35 days.
While blind and deaf, the joey crawls out of the birth canal and into its mother's downward facing pouch where it will develop for another six months.
After the joey has developed in its mother's pouch, it will crawl out periodically and return to the pouch to drink milk and sleep.
For the second six months of its life, the joey will be carried around on its mother's back.
Koalas are polygamous animals.
They do not have families and prefer to live in solitude and distance themselves from other koalas.
Male koalas do not care for their young.
The female koala will care for the joey during the first year of its life only.
Koalas are found in Australia.
Although koalas are often called koala bears, they are not actually bears. They are marsupials because they carry their babies in their pouch.
Koalas live in Eucalyptus trees and only eat Eucalyptus leaves.
Baby koalas are called joeys and are the size of a jelly bean when born.
It is extremely rare that more than one koala is born at a time. The last known set of koala twins were born in 1999.
A Few Facts About Koalas
Structural Differences
Fertilization and Development
Lifestyle
Female Koala
Male Koala
Joey with Mom Koala
Male Mating Call
References
www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvGCx72ZOW0
www.youtube.com/watch?vGCx72ZOW
anthro.palomar.edu/animal/koala_reproduction.htm
www.koalaworlds.com/koala-reproduction.html
https://www.savethekoala.com/about-koalas/physical-characteristics-koala
koalainfo.com/koalas-and-their-social-behaviors
by Emily Fields
Mating
While mating, males often bite females on the neck.
Mating generally occurs between the months of September and February.
Courtship and mating often occur in Eucalyptus trees.
Migration is not involved in courtship or mating.
http://koalainfo.com/mating-strategy-of-the-male-koalas
Full transcript