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"To Kill a Mockingbird" Allusions

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naomi clark

on 6 December 2013

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Transcript of "To Kill a Mockingbird" Allusions

"To Kill a Mockingbird" Allusions
By: Naomi Clark
Allusion Number One
"There was no hurry, for there was no where to go, nothing to buy and
no money to buy with it,
nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County." (6)
"No money to buy with it" refers to the Great Depression. It was a period of very drastic economic downfall effecting people world wide. It was the longest depression we have ever experienced during the 20th century, lasting from 1930 to around mid 1940's proceeding World War 2. Profit, prices and personal income dropped as unemployment rate rose drastically.
This allusion is included to inform the reader of the town's financial position. It allows us to associate many of the actions throughout the book back to the knowledge that they are experiencing a very drastic economic downfall.
"'Here's a quarter,' she said to Walter. 'Go and eat downtown today, you can pay me back tomorrow.'" (25)
Allusion Number Four
"If she found a blade of nut grass in her yard it was like the Second Battle of the Marne." (56)
Allusion Number Six
Allusion Number Seven
Allusion Number Eight
Allusion Number Nine
"Maycomb County had recently been told it had nothing to fear but fear itself." (6)
Allusion Number Two
"Dill had seen
Dracula,
a revelation that moved Jem to eye him with the beginning of respect." (9)
Dracula was a horror novel written by Bram Stoker in 1897. The book follows Count Dracula, a vampire, who is trying to get from Transylvania to England while battling a group of people along the way.
Dracula was a horror novel written by Bram Stoker in 1897. The book follows Count Dracula, a vampire, as he tries to travel from Transylvania to England while battling a group of men and women along the way.
This is included in the novel to not only introduce us to the kinds of stories the children are interested in, but also mention it as a great piece of literature. As we go more into the novel, Jem, Scout, and Dill become very intrigued by Boo Radley, and this is just an example of foreshadowing. Dracula is a very scary and mysterious novel and if that is what the kids are drawn to, then their obsession with the Radley place will tie back to this reference.
This quote is an allusion to the pricing during the Great Depression. Because of the fact that everyone had very little money, items were drastically cheaper than they are today. During the Great Depression, you could buy a sweater for a dollar, a stove for 19 dollars or a washing machine for just 23 dollars.
Allusion Number Three
This was included in order to put things in perspective. We are very used to most things being pretty expensive and it's easy to forget that this novel took place during a time when many people were unemployed and living off a very low amount of profit.
"One day we were so busily playing Chapter XXV, Book II of
One Man's Family,
we did not see Atticus standing on the sidewalk looking at us, slapping a rolled magazine against his knee." (53)
One Man's Family was a radio soap opera that played from 1932 to 1959. It was created by Carlton E. Morse, and was the longest uninterrupted serial in America.
This was included in the novel to compare what the children were doing to a very well known radio show. They took their game of Boo Radley pretty seriously, and tried to make it as dramatic as possible. Scout is relating their game to the show, in a way of saying that, in a sense, it was their own "One Man's Family."
Allusion Number Five
This battle took place during World War I, and was the last huge German attack on the Western front. However they were defeated when French forces and tanks counter-attacked, causing severe damage. It is considered to be the beginning of the First World War.
This was used to add to the characterization of Miss Maudie. The battle was very destructive and that contradicts how you would picture someone as sweet as her. It is used in a very ironic way, as it first talks about her love for all God's creations and then goes into how much she despises the particular grass. It also helps to associate our thoughts of Miss Maudie to very controlling over her garden.
"...I'll have the finest yard in Alabama. Those Bellingraths'll look plain puny when I get started." (97)
Bellingrath Garden and Home is a mansion containing a 65 acre public display garden located in Alabama. It was listed as a landmark in 1977 and as a historic place in 1982.
This is included to extend on the knowledge we already contain about Miss Maudie's passion for her garden. I'm sure that during the time the book took place, it was a very well known location and it allows people who know about it to understand more about her inspiration during that time period.
"'
Mockingbirds
don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy to enjoy.'" (119)
Mockingbirds are known for mimicking songs that other birds sing and the sounds other insects and amphibians make.
This is a very important message that is included in many ways throughout the novel. It represents innocence and the fact that we should not harm something that has not done us wrong. If we know of something that is there to benefit us, we should treat them as such.
"...
Breadlines
in the cities grew longer, people in the country grew poorer." (155)
Breadlines were created to give free food to those who were either homeless, or couldn't afford to pay for their own during the Great Depression.
This was included to once again put their living conditions into prospective. We take what we have for granted and it is interesting for us to read about the situation they are in. It is also an inside look of a child's view on all of the commotion.
During President Andrew Jackson's Inaugural Address, he said there was nothing to fear but fear itself.
This is included to emphasize the support and pick-me-up that the town needed. They were expiriencing a very rough time and this was probably a very encouraging thing to hear, especially from the United States new president. Everyone was very worried and was struggling to hold their financial issues together, and they needed a form of hope.
Allusion Number Ten
"'You weren't born reading "The Mobile Register." 'Jem says I was. He read in a book where I was a
Bullfinch
instead of Finch.'" (22)
Bullfinch's Mythology was a collection of greek mythology works written by Thomas Bullfinch.
This was included to extend on the explanation of Scout's high reading level. Bullfinch's Mythology was a very excellent book but was not generally targeted towards younger children. Even though Jem is kidding, he is just expanding on the fact that Scout is a very big reader.
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