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Drug Use

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Pedro Macias

on 14 April 2016

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Transcript of Drug Use

Methamphetamine
Health 1
Unit 3 Assessment
4/13/15

By: Pedro Macias
and Ryan Goss
Financial Data and the effects on the society
In the U.S there was a study conducted by the independent Rand Corporation in 2009, based on data from 2005, according to whitehouse.gov "estimated the economic cost to society of methamphetamine use at between $16.2-$48.3 billion."
In the U.S when someone is making Methamphetamine they harm society and our environment because the chemicals used to make methamphetamine are toxic, and the lab operators routinely dump waste into streams, rivers, fields, backyards and sewage systems.
This can contaminate water resources for humans and animals.
The more Methamphetamine people use the more the labs make drugs, and the more harming our community more and more.
1919: Methamphetamine is created
Methamphetamine, a stimulant, is developed by a pharmacologist in Japan. The drug alleviates fatigue and produces feelings of alertness and well-being.
1930: Amphetamines are used
Doctors begin using amphetamines in the United States to treat asthma and narcolepsy.
1960:

Doctors in San Francisco drug clinics prescribe injections of methamphetamine to treat heroin addiction. Illegal abuse occurs in subcultures such as outlaw biker gangs and students, which cook and use the drug.
1970:
Methamphetamine, or speed, is regulated in the Controlled Substances Act.
Methamphetamine Trends In the United States. (2010, July 1). Retrieved April 15, 2015, from https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ondcp/Fact_Sheets/pseudoephedrine_fact_sheet_7-16-10_0.pdf

Oregon Policies
Oregon’s prescription-only law has resulted in fewer meth lab incidents.
In 2004, according to the El Paso Intelligence Center National (EPIC) Clandestine Laboratory Seizure System, Oregon had approximately 400 lab incidents.
In 2008, Oregon had just 20 lab incidents, and most were dump sites found near the borders of adjacent states. Meth-related arrests in Oregon have significantly decreased as well.




Methamphetamine Trends In the United States. (2010, July 1). Retrieved April 21, 2015, from https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ondcp/Fact_Sheets/pseudoephedrine_fact_sheet_7-16-10_0.pdf
In the school policies.
1.Parent notification
2. Counselor intervention. Three ­to ten ­day suspension. Restitution for theft and damage to property. A flagrant first offense may result in a recommendation for expulsion. Seven­ to ten­ day suspension or discretionary recommendation for expulsion. Restitution for theft and damage to property.

These laws affect our daily lives because they are helping us prevent people from getting involved in drugs. If the minors from schools see the consequences of using drugs and don't get involved.

This might affect our community in the future because by having rules and laws the state and school made they are preventing the use of drugs. I f this keeps happening and people follow the rules our community will grow in a safer environment. the future generations will be much healthier if they do as laws state.
Student Hand Book/Student Discipline. (2014, January 1). Retrieved April 24, 2015, from http://jcsd.k12.or.us/sites/jcsd.k12.or.us/files/files/MHSStudentHandbook2014-2015.pdf
Drug treatment counselors see more abuse among men who have sex with men. Mexican drug manufacturers begin bringing methamphetamine north of the border. People begin to smoke Meth.
1980:
State and School Policies
Goal Setting
New ways to cook methamphetamine appear. Some new versions are four to six times stronger. Greatest use is seen in the Southwest and West. Methamphetamine use begins and grows in the rural Midwest.
1990's:
Congress passes the Comprehensive Methamphetamine Control Act, which regulates mail order and chemical companies selling chemicals. For example, people who buy large quantities of red phosphorous, iodine and hydrochloric gas must show they will use them for legal purposes.
1996:
If you have the following "symptoms" as a teen or a young adult you may be falling into the path of drugs;

Hanging out with different friends
Not caring about your appearance
getting worse grades
Missing classes or skipping school
Losing interest in your favorite activities
Getting in trouble in school or with the law
Having different eating or sleeping habits
Having more problems with family members and friends
2000:
In the Inland Northwest, and in much of the West, methamphetamine is the favored hard drug, surpassing crack, cocaine and heroin. It's still prescribed for some medical purposes.

Amphetamines are a group of substances, mostly synthetic, that have the effect of stimulating the central nervous system. They can be injected, snorted, smoked, or ingested orally. The term ‘amphetamines’ is often used to refer to a group of amphetamine-related drugs, including amphetamine and methamphetamine. In Australia, amphetamines are almost entirely methamphetamine. These guidelines use the term ‘methamphetamine’ for this reason. The term “crystal meth” or “ice” refers to a high purity, smokeable form of methamphetamine. Other forms include “base” and “speed”. Other amphetamine-type stimulants include appetite suppressants, medications for hyperactivity and other illicit drugs such as MDMA (“ecstasy”) and cocaine
A brief history of Methamphetamine. (2015, January 1). Retrieved April 27, 2015, from http://healthvermont.gov/adap/meth/brief_history.aspx
Being addicted to methamphetamine causes abusers to exhibit symptoms that can include significant anxiety, confusion, insomnia, mood disturbances, and violent behavior. They also may show a number of psychotic features, including paranoia, hallucinations, and delusions (for example, the sensation of insects creeping under the skin). Psychotic symptoms can sometimes last for months or years after a person has quit using, and stress has been shown to form a random recurrence of methamphetamine psychosis in formerly psychotic meth users. Some people think that meth is something you can get on and get off just as easy, and it is this kind of information that corrupts the decision making process inside your brain and tells the person that meth is okay.
Effects on the brain
Effects on the body
If you have the problems above the 12step.org says to follow this 12 step program;
Admit you were powerless over our addiction - that your life had become unmanageable
Come to believe that a Power greater than yourself could restore you to sanity
Make a decision to turn your will and your lives over to the care of God
Make a searching and fearless moral inventory of yourselves
Admit to God, to yourselves and to another human being the exact nature of your wrongs
Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character
Humbly asked God to remove your shortcoming
Make a list of all persons you had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all
Make direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others
Continue to take personal inventory and when you were wrong promptly admitted
Sought through prayer and meditation to improve your conscious contact with God as you understand God, praying only for knowledge of God's will for you and the power to carry that out
Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to other addicts, and to practice these principles in all our affairs
In addition to the mental consequences of methamphetamine use, long-term users also suffer physical effects, including weight loss, severe tooth decay, tooth loss, and skin sores. Skin sores are the result of picking and scratching the skin to get rid of insects imagined to be crawling under it.
Methamphetamine. (n.d.). Retrieved April 28, 2015, from http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/methamphetamine/what-are-long-term-effects-methamphetamine-abuse
What is methamphetamine?
Methamphetamine. (n.d.). Retrieved April 28, 2015, from http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/methamphetamine/what-are-long-term-effects-methamphetamine-abuse
The 12 steps. (2015, January 1). Retrieved April 28, 2015, from http://www.12step.org/the-12-steps/
Advocacy
Methamphetamine Action Colation claims they are doing the following:

"A public awareness campaign designed to help people recognize a meth lab, and encouraging them to call the MEG Unit confidential tip line: 636-797-6474.
Starting a Drug Endangered Children's Task force to assure that we are doing everything we can to protect the innocent who are growing up in dangerous environments.
Educating the public about the county's list of meth labs seizures, located here, and advocating for use of the address list. Encouraging people to take all the steps they can, including purchasing home Meth test kits which are available on the internet, before buying or renting a home.
Coordinate annual Meth Awareness Day (MAD) Conference for local professionals and interested parties to keep issues related to meth high on everyone's radar.
At the MAD Conference, we present "Making A Difference" awards to local individuals and organizations who have been instrumental in addressing the meth epidemic. Past awareness include"
when you set yourself a goal go for it as a daily routine.
plan out your next day every night.
think about the things you can do .
think about the things/persons you should avoid during the day
think about the healthy foods you can eat.
think about therapies
Advocacy. (n.d.). Retrieved April 29, 2015, from http://www.methactioncoalition.org/Advocacy.html
Analysis of Advocacy
The advocacy groups discouraging the use of meth do a lot of good but also have some things terribly wrong.
Some good things that they do very well is inform the public and children about meth use. They set up seminars and help home owners to find houses that haven't been used for the use or production of meth.
The thing that they did not do well is sympathize with meth users. They are not putting a lot of information out their about how to get help. They are more helping the consequences of meth users than the users themselves.
I feel like the advocacy group was trying to put out good information about the decision making process that needs to happen for drug abstinence. Being a good decision maker makes you way less likely to do drugs, and if you learn good decision making skills you will have a better life in general that comes from the abstinence of drugs and other harmful things.
Decision making
Decision making is taking the pros and cons of something and making the choice whether you are or aren't going to do it. When making the decision whether or not to do drugs someone gathers the information they have learned through out their years of living and come to a conclusion. If they choose to do drugs that usually means that they either do not have enough information about the consequences, or they feel that the good effects of drugs outweigh the bad ones. That is why it is important to inform the public about drug use so they may make an educated decision and hopefully choose to not do drugs.
Drug treatment
During drug treatment programs they try to cure the physical and psychological effects of drugs. To help cure the physical effects they put you through a detox period which could last from 5 to 10 days where you are monitored 24-7 and are not aloud any access to the drug. This is to get it out of your system and for you to be monitored going through withdrawals. This helps to clear up a lot of the physical symptoms of a drug addict and teaches them to deal with it.
Next comes the psychological treatment to show the drug user that they don't need the drug and to stop them from getting back on the drug by showing them ways to deal with their cravings for it. The treatment includes one on one and group therapy, which helps you understand the drug.
It is important to quit drugs because they can ruin your life in multiple ways such as, not getting hired at a job, loss of money, paranoia, and physical problems as well.

Get Help. Beat Addiction. (n.d.). Retrieved May 5, 2015, from http://g.americanaddictioncenters.org/?

There are many places where a person can get help with their drug problems such as:
Federal:
American Addiction Centers-
http://b.americanaddictioncenters.org
State:
Oregon Inpatient Drug Treatment Programs-http://www.drugrehabservices.com/oregon-inpatient-drug-treatment-programs.html
Local:
Oregon Drug Rehab and Treatment Programs Jefferson County-http://www.drugrehaboregon.com/drug_treatment_county/Jefferson_County.htm
New research
Prevention programs are usually designed for use in a particular setting, such as at home, at school, or within the community, but can be adapted for use in several settings. In addition, programs are also designed with the intended audience in mind: for everyone in the population, for those at greater risk, and for those already involved with drugs or other problem behaviors.
NIDA's prevention research program focuses on risks for drug abuse and other problem behaviors that occur throughout a child's development, from pregnancy through his/her teen years. Research funded by NIDA and other Federal research organizations show that early intervention can prevent many child risk behaviors.
DrugFacts: Lessons from Prevention Research. (n.d.). Retrieved May 5, 2015, from http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/lessons-prevention-research
Works cited
https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ondcp/Fact_Sheets/pseudoephedrine_fact_sheet_7-16-10_0.pdf

http://healthvermont.gov/adap/meth/brief_history.aspx

http://jcsd.k12.or.us/sites/jcsd.k12.or.us/files/files/MHSStudentHandbook2014-2015.pdf

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ondcp/Fact_Sheets/pseudoephedrine_fact_sheet_7-16-10_0.pdf

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/methamphetamine/what-are-long-term-effects-methamphetamine-abuse

http://www.methactioncoalition.org/Advocacy.html

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/lessons-prevention-research
12 Step Program. (2014, January 1). Retrieved April 28, 2015, from http://www.12step.org/
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