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ONE CHILD POLICY

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Coco Xiao

on 19 May 2014

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Transcript of ONE CHILD POLICY

ONE CHILD POLICY
TOK ORAL
PRESENTED BY COCO XIAO
ETHICS
REASON
HOW DO YOU FEEL?
TO WHAT EXTENT IS IT JUSTIFIED FOR GOVERNMENTS TO ENFORCE FAMILY PLANNING POLICIES?
JUSTIFIED
Control population
Prevent over crowding
Reserve scarce resources
Increase living standard
1798, Thomas Malthus’ theory on the principle of population - lower population growth boost economic growth and per capita income growth
EVIDENCE
In 1950 the rate of population change in China was 1.9 per cent each year.
The birth rate in China has fallen since 1979, and the rate of population growth is now 0.7 per cent.
Since the end of the 1970s, the Chinese economy has been expanding dramatically with an average annual growth rate of 9 percent.

UNJUSTIFIED
Higher gender imbalance
Men struggle to find wives
Aging population
Smaller work force
PREDICTION
Predict that China's shrinking work force is likely to trim 3.25 percentage points off the country's annual growth rate between 2012 and 2030
Predict that an estimated 30 million or more Chinese men who will be looking for a wife in 2030 but unable to find one
UNJUSTIFIED
JUSTIFIED
Deontology
Consequentialism
DEONTOLOGY
CONSEQUENTIALISM
Deontology is the normative ethical position that judges the morality of an action based on the action's adherence to a rule or rules. If an act is not in accord with the Right, it may not be undertaken, no matter the Good that it might produce.
Consequentialists hold that choices—acts and/or intentions—are to be morally assessed solely by the states of affairs they bring about. Consequentialists thus assert that whatever choices that bring good results, are the choices that it is morally right to make and to execute.
Is it morally right for someone to give birth to a child that cannot be supported?
AFRICA
CONCLUSION
ONE CHILD POLICY
Measure to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate
In the late 1970s
Decreed that couples in China could only have one child
Lower population is good for economic development
One-child policy led to lower population
Thus, one-child policy is good for economic development

DEDUCTIVE REASONING
FLAWS
Simply prediction
Have not happen
Cannot make sure the premises are entirely true
Conclusion is likely to be false
REASON
UNJUSTIFIED
JUSTIFIED
Is it morally right to have forced abortion?
Is it morally right to force mothers to abort at final stage?
Governments have not enforce strong family planning policies
No number limits
Teach families about the benefits of having fewer children
African population is increasing at the rate of 2.5 percent annually.
If this rate is not decreased the population of Africa will double by the year 2036
African women have 5.5 children (average) during their life.
Scarce resources can cause tension and fighting among the people of Africa.
The economies of African countries can be put under great stress as the governments struggle to feed, educate, and keep the ever growing population healthy.
IT IS JUSTIFIED
EVEN THOUGH THERE ARE COSTS IN THE PROCESS
LEADS TO A GREATER GOOD
NO PERFECT POLICY

A set of mental processes used to derive inferences or conclusions from premises
(reasoning from the general to the particular)
Moral principles that govern a person’s behavior or the conducting of an activity
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