Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

THE DRAMA

No description
by

Alessia Cavallaro

on 31 October 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of THE DRAMA

THE GOLDEN AGE
OF GREEK THEATRE
GREEK CHORUS
- First as narrator, then the ideal spectator
- Originally 50 men, reduced to 12-15 for tragedies, 24 for comedies
- Unpaid volunteers doing their civic duty
- Rehearsal period -> 4 months
- Trained at state expense
THE CULT OF DIONYSUS
- Originated in Asia Minor
- Born in 1200 BC
- It included human and animal sacrifices
-
Catharsis
: emotional release
MEDIEVAL DRAMA
ELIZABETHAN PLAYHOUSES & INN-YARDS
Inn-Yards
:
- sort of theatres inside taverns
- plays performed at the inn instead of paying
- people watched from balconies
- audience capacity: up to 500
THE GLOBE THEATRE
- Built in 1599
- "
wooden O
"
- It could hold up to 3,000
spectators
- Tiered stages, hidden doors
and unusual construction
- Burned down in 1613 during
a production of
Henry VIII
- Finally torn down in 1664
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
- Stratford-upon-Avon, April 1564: birth
- 1584: London - first experiences as actor
- 1593: sonnets to the Earl of Southampton
- 1590/1605: productive years
- Lord Chamberlain's Men -> King's Men
- Stratford-upon-Avon, 23rd April 1616: death
-
First Folio
: 36 of his plays published by Hemings and Condell
THE DRAMA
From the origins to Shakespeare
THE CLASSICAL UNITIES
GREEK THEATRE
VS
ROMAN THEATRE
FROM ROMANS TO MIDDLE AGE
ELIZABETHAN CHORUS
ROMEO & JULIET
MACBETH
THE TEMPEST
Elizabethan Age
Rules for
drama
derived from Aristotle's
Poetics
.
1.
Unity of action
: a play should have one main action.
2.
Unity of place
: a play should cover a single physical place.
3.
Unity of time
: the action in a play should take place over no more than 24 hours.
Greek theatre
Roman theatre
- half circular orchestra
- 3 entrances for actors
-built on flat plans
THE DITHYRAMB (
CHORIC HYMN
)
- Athens, 500 BC
- Essential part of Dionysus' rites
- Earliest form: hymn in the middle of the mass, performed by a chorus of 50 men dressed as satyrs
- Evolved into stories in 'play' form: drama
- circular orchestra
- 1 entrance for actors
- built on the natural slope of a hill
- Athens: where the rites of Dionysus evolved into theatre
-
Theatre
: derivation from the Greek word
theatron
-
Orchestra
: between the stage and the audience

How plays were performed:
- in the daytime
- actors wore cothornos or buskins
- use of masks to amplify the voice
- little or no scenery
- orchestra -> stage
Functions
:
- maintain a sense of ceremony
- reinforce the passions
- connect the audience and the actors

Playhouses
:
- indoor theatres born from inn-yards
- allowed an all year round profession
- audience capacity: between 1,500 and 3,000
- most famous:
Gray's Inn
and
Whitehall

- A single character with narrative purposes
- At the beginning and at the end of the play(
prologue
and
epilogue
)
- Commentary of the plays
- Striking language to help people picture the reality
- Shakespeare: irregular iambic pentameter for the chorus' speech
Kinds of stages(simultaneous):
- Fixed--> in available spaces
- Moveable-->
pageant wagons

Religious Plays
:
-
Mystery plays
: about Christ or
from the Old Testament
-
Miracle plays
: lives of saints
-
Morality plays
: didactic allegories
Decline (late 16th century):
1. Increased interest in classical learning
2. Changed social structure
3. Religious plays outlawed
- Romans' departure--> no more
amphitheatres, single players(minstrels)
- 10th century --> Church brought back drama
- Easter celebrations in Latin
- 14th century --> drama removed from the church
- Language: Latin --> English
- Actors: clergy --> members of the
guilds
- Birth of
pageant wagons
(platform fitted with wheels)
- Main cycles -->
Chester
,
York
,
Towneley
or
Wakefield
and
Coventry
Themes:
- greed for power --> regicide
- reversal of values --> chaos
- sense of guilt --> Lady
Macbeth's suicide
Themes:
- love as cause of violence
- the inevitability of fate
- connection between love and death
Themes:
- forgiveness
- relationship between
native and invaders
- power given from supernatural knowledge
Medieval secular Plays
:
- Farce
- Moralities
- Miming and disguising
- Interludes and masques
Amphiteatres
:
- used during Summer months
- public outdoor structure
- audience capacity: between 1,500
and 3,000
Full transcript