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Epic/ Epic Poem/ Epic Hero

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Anna Aurand

on 16 April 2015

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Transcript of Epic/ Epic Poem/ Epic Hero

Hercules: is the Roman name for the Greek divine hero Heracles, who was the son of Zeus and the mortal Alcmene. In classical mythology, Hercules is famous for his strength and for his numerous far-ranging adventures.
Epic/Epic Poem/Epic Hero
What is an Epic?
An Epic is a long narrative poem that celebrates a hero's deeds
Epic Poem
An epic poem is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.
Epic Hero
An epic hero is a brave and noble character in an epic poem, admired for great achievements or affected by grand events
the hero is outstanding
the setting is large
The actions described in the work are deeds of great valor, often requiring superhuman strength, intelligence, or endurance
supernatural forces insert themselves in the action, such as gods, angels, and demons
written in a special style
the poet remains objective
The setting of the work is vast in scope, covering a whole nation, the world, or even the universe
Conclusion
Epic: A long narrative poem that celebrates a hero’s deeds.
Usually based on historical facts, and told by poets who were master improvisers usually while singing or chanting.

Characteristics of an Epic:
• Hero is outstanding.
• Setting is large in scope, covering a whole nation, the world, or even the universe.
• Actions in the work are deeds of great valor, often requiring superhuman strength, intelligence, or endurance.
• Supernatural forces insert themselves in the action, such as gods, angels, and demons.
• Written in a special style.
• Poet remains objective.
• The setting is vast, covering a whole nation, world, or even the universe.
• Story usually starts in the middle of the action.

Epic Hero: A brave and noble character in and epic poem admired for great achievements.

Elements of an epic hero:
• Often has supernatural abilities.
• Charged with a quest and tested to prove their worthiness.
• The hero’s travels take them to a supernatural world.
• Must reach a low point where the hero is ready to give up or appears defeated.
• Resurrection occurs.
• Restitution (the hero regains his rightful place on the throne).

Epic Poem: Lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.

Elements of an epic poem:
• The hero is a figure of great national or even cosmic importance, and represents a culture’s heroic ideal.
• The setting of the poem is ample in scale, and may be worldwide, or even larger.
• The action involves superhuman deeds in battle.
• In these great actions, the gods and other supernatural beings take an interest or an active part.
• An epic poem is a ceremonial performance and is narrated in a ceremonial style which is deliberately distanced from ordinary speech and proportioned to the grandeur and formality of the heroic subject matter and the epic architecture.

Epics are based on historical facts
Epics were told by oral poets who were master improvisors, able to compose verses in their heads while simultaneously singing or chanting
Epics from different languages and time periods do not always have the same characteristics. Characteristics of an Epic include the following:
Characteristics of an Epic
Long, formal speeches such as challenges, inset narratives, flashbacks, and points of debate occur within the midst of the action; characters are commonly revealed in dialogue.
Elements of the Epic Style
Elements of an Epic Hero
often possessed of supernatural abilities
the hero is charged with a quest
the hero is tested to prove the worthiness of himself and his quest
the presence of numerous mythical beings, magical and helpful animals, and human helpers and companions
the hero's travels take him to a supernatural world
the cycle must reach a low point where the hero nearly gives up his quest or appears defeated
a resurrection occurs
Restitution. Often this takes the form of a hero regaining his rightful place on the throne
Examples of an Epic:
“He who has seen everything, I will make known (?) to the lands.I will teach (?) about him who experienced all things,... alike,Anu granted him the totality of knowledge of all.He saw the Secret, discovered the Hidden,he brought information of (the time) before the Flood.He went on a distant journey, pushing himself to exhaustion,but then was brought to peace.He carved on a stone stela all of his toils,and built the wall of Uruk-Haven,the wall of the sacred Eanna Temple, the holy sanctuary.”- Epic of Gilgamesh
Repetitive, earlier incidents seem to repeat in later incidents, and stock epithets are constantly applied to proper nouns such as "horse-taming Hector". names are often symbolic like Odysseus which means "man of woe" because he is know to give people suffering and also receives suffering himself.
“In the middle of the journey of our life, I came to myself, in a dark wood, where the direct way was lost. It is a hard thing to speak of, how wild, harsh and impenetrable that wood was, so that thinking of it recreates the fear. It is scarcely less bitter than death: but, in order to tell of the good that I found there, I must tell of the other things I saw there” - “The Divine Comedy” by Dante
Speeches are usually follow by "thus he spoke" to emphasize that the character was the one speaking and not the narrator.
“Listen:You have heard of the Danish Kingsin the old days and how they were great warriors.Shield, the son of Sheaf,took many an enemy's chair,terrified many a warrior,after he was found an orphan.He prospered under the sky until people everywhere listened when he spoke.He was a good king!”- Beowulf
Famous Modern Epics
Characters often address each other by patronymics such as "Son of Peleus" aka Achilles.
“Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal tast Brought Death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat,” - “Paradise Lost” by John Milton
Sabrina Brought, Micah Hetrick, and Anna Aurand
The opening of an epic usually starts in the middle of all the "action" instead of the beginning and often starts with invocation and an epic question.
Examples of Epic Poems:
Examples of an Epic Hero:
Achilles: a Greek hero from the Trojan War
The Homeric Poems for the Iliad and The Odyssey
Perseus: the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty of Danaans
Odysseus: also known by the Latin name Ulysses, he was a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and a hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey.
East is East by Rudyard Kipling
Paradise Lost
by John Milton
The hero is a figure of great national or even cosmic importance, and represents a culture’s heroic ideal.
The setting of the poem is ample in scale, and may be worldwide, or even larger.
The action involves superhuman deeds in battle.
In these great actions, the gods and other supernatural beings take an interest or an active part.
An epic poem is a ceremonial performance and is narrated in a ceremonial style which is deliberately distanced from ordinary speech and proportioned to the grandeur and formality of the heroic subject matter and the epic architecture.
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