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Decoding Romeo and Juliet

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by

Christopher Frye

on 3 February 2015

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Transcript of Decoding Romeo and Juliet

Decoding
Romeo and Juliet
Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.
Prologue
Two households, both alike in dignity,
{
{
{
{
{
Iamb
Iamb
Iamb
Iamb
Iamb
Iamb
ic
Penta
meter
Unstressed / Stressed
Five sets of rhythm
Two
house
holds,
both
a
like
in
dig
ni
ty
,
In
fair
Ver
o
na,
where
we
lay
our
scene,
From
an
cient
grudge
break
to
new
mu
ti
ny
,
Where
ci
vil
blood
makes
ci
vil
hands
un
clean
.
From
forth
the
fa
tal
loins
of
these
two
foes
A
pair
of
star
-cross'd
lov
ers
take
their
life
;
Whose
mis
ad
ven
tured
pi
te
ous
over
throws
Do
with
their
death
bu
ry
their
par
ents'
strife
.
The
fear
ful
pass
age
of
their
death
-mark'd
love
,
And
the
con
tinu
ance
of
their
par
ents'
rage
,
Which,
but
their
child
ren's
end
, nought
could
re
move
,
Is
now
the
two
hours'
tra
ffic
of
our
stage
;
The
which
if
you
with
pat
ient
ears
at
tend
,
What
here
shall
miss
, our
toil
shall
strive
to
mend
.
A
B
A
B
C
D
C
D
E
F
E
F
G
G
Sonnet
14 Lines
Set rhyme scheme
Iambic Pentameter
Definitions
Rhythm
Rhyme
Assignment
Select 14 pictures, one to represent each line of the prologue.
Include a text based subtitle on each picture
Create a short video with transitions between each picture
Include background music or narration
Upload the finished video to the classroom Moodle page
Example:
GOALS:
Decode
complex language into
component parts
.
Associate
those component parts with
visual images
that can help others see what you see.
Worthy of honor
JULIET
'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What's Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What's in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name which is no part of thee
Take all myself.
ROMEO
I take thee at thy word:
Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized;
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.
JULIET
What man art thou that thus bescreen'd in night
So stumblest on my counsel?
ROMEO
By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee;
Had I it written, I would tear the word.
JULIET
My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words
Of that tongue's utterance, yet I know the sound:
Art thou not Romeo and a Montague?
ROMEO
Neither, fair saint, if either thee dislike.
Full transcript