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Fairytale Logic

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by

Melissa Simpliciano

on 31 January 2013

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Transcript of Fairytale Logic

Couplet - Name: Alicia Elisbeth Stallings

-She was born in Decatur, Georgia, and later moved to Athens, Greece in 1999 and has lived there ever since.

-Big contributor to POETRY Magazine

- Published 3 books: Archaic Smile, Hapax, and Olives. Author: A. E. Stallings - Italian sonnet - "Gather the chin hairs of a man-eating goat" (Stallings 2). THREE BILLY GOATS GRUFF
- "Tiptoe up to a dragon where it basks and snatch its bone" (Stallings 5). SHREK
- "The language of snakes, perhaps, an invisible cloak" (Stallings 11). HARRY POTTER
- "An army of ants at your beck" (Stallings 12). ANTZ
- "Hand over your firstborn son" (Stallings 14). RUMPELSTILTSKIN

- Stallings includes examples from various well known fairy tales and fantasy fiction novels to help demonstrate that those characters in each tale does whatever it takes to achieve their goal, even if may be extreme.

- These scenarios must be accomplished in fairy tales or fantasies because it is the LOGIC of the fairy tales.

- When reading these various scenes, readers can picture them in their head. By A.E. Stallings Fairytale Logic Meter - Open verse form poem Rhyme - ABBAABBACDECDE Parallelism - "The will to do whatever must be done: Marry a monster. Hand over your firstborn son" (Stallings 13-14).

- This quote is from the tale of Rumpelstiltskin where a girl must turn straw into gold and to win a prince she needs to hand over her firstborn son. This demonstrates that one will do anything to achieve what they want.

- It also brings up a question on how anyone, especially children, can read these fairy tales with these type of tragic scenes and gain something out of it. Allusion/ Imagery Type of Poem Fairy-tale Logic Fairy tales are full of impossible tasks:

Gather the chin hairs of a man-eating goat,

Or cross a sulphuric lake in a leaky boat,

Select the prince from a row of identical masks,

Tiptoe up to a dragon where it basks

And snatch its bone; count dust specks, mote by mote,

Or learn the phone directory by rote.

Always it’s impossible what someone asks—


You have to fight magic with magic. You have to believe

That you have something impossible up your sleeve,

The language of snakes, perhaps, an invisible cloak,

An army of ants at your beck, or a lethal joke,

The will to do whatever must be done:

Marry a monster. Hand over your firstborn son. What does this poem mean? - This poem is open for interpretations
- We can either gain some message from this or not. - "Marry a monster" (Stallings 14). - This quote is a parallel to LIFE. For example, in Beauty and the Beast, Belle falls in love with the good in the beast even though his appearance. - Fairy tales were meant to give HOPE and IMAGINATION to little children and others. But it can also INFLUENCE us to do whatever it takes to succeed whether BAD or GOOD.
-She focuses on the extreme things needed to be done in order to achieve their goals. The scenarios in the poem are what characters do in order to get their :) ending.
- Stallings belief of fairy tales is diverse. - "Fairy tales are full of impossible tasks" (Stallings 1). - Life is also full of hard, impossible tasks as well. Life isn't always easy. - Our interpretation: Life isn't always easy, but it's not impossible. Tone - "Select a prince from a row of identical masks" (Stallings 4). - In reality it is difficult to find that special person. People keep searching for them but it's impossible. - This poem is a parrallel to reality. "Tiptoe up to a dragon, where it basks and snatch its bone; count dust specks mote by mote" (Stallings 5-6). - Stand up and take chances, hope for the best. Face your fears head on. - "Fairy tales are full of impossible tasks: Gather the chin hairs of a man eating goat or cross a sulphuric lake in a leaky boat...Always it's impossible what someone asks-" (Stallings 1-8). - Life is hard and there are days where it may seem impossible. We run into ridiculous tasks each day. People ask us to do things we find as not possible. - Negative
- Childish and cute
- Positive "You an fight magic with magic. You have to believe that you have someething impossible up your sleeve" (Stalling 9-10). - You are the only one who can make your own decisions, to have the belief and will to overcome your fears. Shift AP Prompt Question - In the first half of the poem, Stallings tone is negative, the impossible tasks the characters has to overcome in order to get there happy ending.

- In the second half, Stallings has a positive tone, talks about what is needed to accomplish their impossible tasks; to believe in themselves. From your perspective, do you think that fairy tales teach us valuable lessons about life? Explain. Melissa S. Roshayne G. Kristyn Y.
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