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What is Scholarship?

A summary and analysis of the Association of College & Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy. The ACRL Framework provides us with an opportunity to grasp how and why scholars do what they do.
by

William Badke

on 23 October 2015

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Transcript of What is Scholarship?

5. Scholarship as
Conversation
4. Research as Inquiry
1. Authority is Constructed
and Contextual
Scholarship is not a mystery.
It is a quest.
The Association of College and Research Libraries has created a new framework for information literacy (the ability to use information to do research). This presentation shows how the new framework defines the main features of scholarship.

We will be considering several "threshold concepts." A threshold concept is a significant underlying idea that guides action. It opens the door to great things.
What is Scholarship?
Scholarship is:
1. A quest
2. An adventure into a problem or issue
3. A journey with others who join the conversation
4. An expedition that demands good methods, critical thinking, and the retracing of paths.
5. A path to discovery and advancement
What is Scholarship?
Scholarship is all about a profound discontent, about a quest to discover more, about a
burning desire to solve society’s problems and make a better world.  -
William Badke

3. Information has Value
An example of a conversation:
An example of a debate:
Park, J. M., & Fertig, A. (2014). Homelessness
Is Important but not a determining factor in
children’s healthy development.
Chicago: MacArthur Foundation.
Example of a research problem statement:
A psychology paper with a hypothesis:
Badke, William. "Student Theological Research as an Invitation."
Theological Librarianship
5, no.1 (2012): 30-42.
Neusner, Jacob. "Mr. Sanders's Pharisees and Mine.
Bulletin for Biblical Research
2 (1992) 143-169.
2. Information creation
as a Process
The type of search engine used determines the type and quality of the information found.
As a commodity, academic literature is
expensive. This image denotes Cornell
University cutting off Elsevier, which was
viewed as charging too much for
its journals (Elsevier has a higher profit
percentage than Apple).

The large size of annual publication of academic literature speaks
to the wealth of educational
value added every year.
Value to Society
6. Searching as Strategic Exploration
Full transcript