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Alfred, Lord Tennyson

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Tyler Dunn

on 25 March 2013

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Transcript of Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Example (Stanza 2):

“Theirs not to make reply.
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.” The main theme of this certain poem is the glorification of military actions,
no matter their outcome. 1809-1892
Victorian Era Poet
He came from a humble family in Linconshire
His family went through many hardships from the death of a son, to the epileptic plague that spread across the family.
Through all of this, the family was filled with very talented members, despite the tough times they all went through.
The troubles of his life often influence his writing style, he wrote with a higher level of language as well as an overall sophisticated and thoughtful tone
Tennyson went to Cambridge for an escape from his depressing life rather than for actual academic studies
In Cambridge, Tennyson met Arthur Hallam, who became an influential part of Tennyson's life and career as a poet
Hallam and Tennyson were involved in a plot to overthrow the King of Spain by providing revolutionaries with information and money.
Tennyson died in 1892 in England
The Charge of the Light Brigade Alfred, Lord Tennyson Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
"Forward, the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns!" he said.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred. "Forward, the Light Brigade!"
Was there a man dismayed?
Not though the soldier knew
Someone had blundered.
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred. Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volleyed and thundered;
Stormed at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of Hell
Rode the six hundred. Flashed all their sabers bare,
Flashed as they turned in air,
Sab'ring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wondered.
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right through the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reeled from the saber stroke
Shattered and sundered.
Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred. Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volleyed and thundered;
Stormed at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came through the jaws of Death
Back from the mouth of Hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred. When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wondered.
Honor the charge they made,
Honor the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred. Alfred, Lord Tennyson Bibliography "Alfred Lord Tennyson." : The Poetry Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Mar. 2013. <http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/alfred-tennyson>.
"The Battle of Balaclava." BritishBattles.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Mar 2013. <http://www.britishbattles.com/crimean-war/balaclava.htm>.
"Charge of the Light Brigade, 1854." EyewitnesstoHistory.com. Ibis Communications, Inc., n.d. Web. 22 Mar 2013. <http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/lightbrigade.htm>.
"Lord Alfred Tennyson." - Poets.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Mar. 2013.
<http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/300> Style Dactylic Meter

Example (Stanza 1):

“Half a league / Half a league”
(Stressed;unstressed; unstressed / Stressed; unstressed; unstressed) Rhyme and Anaphora Imagery


Tennyson illustrates the use of allegory in the lines
“Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred.”

"They that had fought so well
Came through the jaws of Death" Allegory Example (Stanza 3):

"Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volleyed and thundered;
Stormed at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well," Foreshadowing “Valley of Death”

“Theirs but to do & die”

“Not though the soldier knew some one had blundered” The Real Charge of the Light Brigade Repeatedly Held From Battle
Orders Come to Lord Lucan (Nicknamed "Look-On")
Take back Russian Artillery... From Horseback
Attack Despite Questionable Orders
Charge Alone into Valley Uncovered
Rest of Army Watches, Afraid to Join
Only Come to Help Once the Light Brigade has Begun to Retreat
Signifies the Difference Between Truth and Fiction
Also Shows how Propagandized Tennyson's Version Was Tone and Literal Meaning First Stanza First Two Lines Build Anticipation
Third Makes You Say "Wait What?"
Rest of the First is Glorification Second Stanza Begins With Another Buildup
Makes you Doubt it Again
Raises more Questions than It Answers
Out Comes the Propaganda Diction Tone and Literal Meaning Third Stanza Builds Up The Charge
Hoping for Against the Odds Victory
Tennyson Tells You What Happens Fourth Stanza Powerful Diction:

“volleyed,” “thundered,” “plunged,” “reeled” and “stormed” Anxious as "All the World Wondered"
Excitement as they Break Through
Confusion/Sadness as they Retreat
Excitement Carries Over Tone and Literal Meaning Fifth Stanza Back To Excitement, Covers up Retreat
Draws Pride as the Reader Imagines these Men
Tennyson Refers to them as Heroes Sixth Stanza Built In Memorial
Tennyson Tells you Outright To Feel Pride For These Men and To Remember them as Heroes Repetition "Half a League, Half a League, Half a League Onward" Sets a Frantic Pace for the Poem, Excites Reader "Valley Of Death" Psalm 23: Soldiers Realize Imminent Death, Accept It "Rode The Six Hundred" Guideline for how the Reader sees the Six Hundred "Cannons to the..." Creates Frenzied Tone, Exaggerates Emotion, Used to Hide Little Facts Thank you for your attention
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