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Primary School e-Safety Training

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Chris Foreman

on 4 September 2012

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Transcript of Primary School e-Safety Training

e-Safety Training Risk Reduction Responsible User Who are we trying to protect? Safe Students Both in School and at Home Staff Professional and Personal Parents Safe and Secure Learning Opportunities Precautionary Principle
v.s.
As Low As Reasonably Achievable Partnership Home - School Training Events Students Lois’s friend offers to share their Instant Messenger (like MSN) contacts. Lois is very pleased because she now has 150 ‘friends’. It can help improve learning and achievement in all areas
Children enjoy technology and are more engaged in their learning because it’s both motivational and fun
It helps children to be more creative and independent in their learning
It can improve their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills
It helps parents, carers and schools to keep in touch and work together to support children’s learning Why is learning with technology a good thing? OFSTED

Any school which receives a grade 4 for Safeguarding will automatically be given Notice to Improve.

These arrangements 'raise the bar' about the importance of Safeguarding for schools and will also facilitate the identification and dissemination of best practice. Sophie doesn’t go online for a few days.
She doesn’t talk to anyone: she’s too embarrassed to talk to anyone face to face.
She remembers a lesson at school where she learnt about a red button, so she looks in MSN and finds it. It says ‘report abuse’.
She types all the details into the form. She feels better for having told someone. She doesn’t talk to her ‘boyfriend’ again. For a while Sophie has been chatting online, in secret, with someone older than her. At first he seemed really nice and appeared to understand her better than her family. She knew it was silly, but she found it easy to tell him lots of personal things, and she was pleased to have an ‘older boyfriend’ online. But now he is sending her very personal and ’explicit’ messages which make her feel uncomfortable and uneasy about the ‘relationship’. Jack likes his friend and would like to meet him.
He tells him he’ll see him on Saturday and he’ll be bringing his dad.
His friend says ‘OK’ and that his dad will be there too.
They have a good kick about in the park and the dads find a coffee stall! Jack has been talking to an online ‘friend’ for some time. The ‘friend’ seems really nice and they have loads in common. They’ve sent Jack a photo of themselves. It’s the holiday and they ask Jack to meet in the park. James is sitting with his Mum; they are using the internet together. James’ Mum explains he should never give out his private information to anyone, and, if he is not sure, he should talk to a grown-up at home or at school. James is 7 years old. He’s in a chat room – a pizza parlour in a ‘virtual’ world. Someone is ‘talking’ to him and asks if he wants to chat ‘outside’ and can they swap email addresses? Lois’s ‘friends’ have been collected by sharing address books.
She only knows about one third of the people in her contact list.
She has used the features in MSN to sort her ‘friends’ into groups – school, home friends, family, holiday mates.
She also has a group for ‘friends of friends’ i.e. internet strangers.
She does not give out any personal details to these people.
She is happy to chat online with friends of friends, but nothing more.
She does not use her web cam when she talks to this group. Parental query: staff using own ICT devices to capture pictures or contact pupils (legitimately!!)

Staff personal online profiles revealing personal details to all – including pupils and their parents!

Staff subjected to cyberbullying attacks by pupils

‘Their partner downloaded porn on the school’s laptop’ - primary head teacher


‘The monitoring software recorded tens of thousands of violations in a two week period’ - secondary head teacher

‘There’s a website created by my pupils listing children no one likes and their parents are telling me to do something about it’ - primary head teacher


‘The children use their mobile phones to send porn via bluetooth’ - primary head teacher Are you prepared for the following? Protecting children whilst they are in our care and educating them for when they are not!

e-safety is a child safety – not an ICT – issue! Ofsted SEF Question ? includes:
To what extent do learners feel safe and adopt safe practices?

For example:

the extent to which learners adopt safe and responsible practices, dealing sensibly with risk, in a range of activities within and outside the classroom, including the use of new technologies and the internet. Escalate High Risk
- to the service provider
- report abuse
- involve LA support services

Encourage safe behaviour – Medium to low risk
The young person should be supported to stop the activity, or take no further action

There is little or no danger to the young person - Low/No risk The activity is one they may continue with Use the scenario cards on your table
Rate each one… Table Exercise:
Assessing the risk Issues to consider
Becta’s Schools website http://www.becta.org.uk/schools/esafety Main recommendations:
E-safety co-ordinator
Policy and management team
Roles and responsibilities
Checklists of AUPs
Incident log

Safetynet discussion forum Policy and practice - what help is available? What should your school be doing? know how to report any concerns they may have? know the SMART rules? get the opportunity to improve their digital literacy skills? receive e-safety education at appropriate places across the curriculum? understand what safe and responsible online behaviour means? Do your learners… Is your school e-safe? “...in all schools action is taken at a whole-school level to ensure that e-safety is mainstreamed throughout the school’s teaching, learning and other practices. In particular I recommend that:

Government should encourage schools to use Becta’s self-review framework to drive continual improvement in schools’ use of ICT including with regard to e-safety.

100% of schools should have AUPs that are regularly reviewed, monitored and agreed with parents and students. Guidance on this should be incorporated in Becta’s revised self-review framework.” The Byron Review Ofsted Self Evaluation Form Schools have a duty of care Why do I need to take action? If not, why not?
Take action now understand how to protect their children in the home? receive regular training and updates? understand their roles and responsibilities? understand e-safety issues and risks? Do your parents and governors… Is your school e-safe? Table developed by the EUKids Online project
and referenced in paragraph 1.3 of the Byron Review. Providing misleading info or advice Values Creating and uploading inappropriate material Sexual Bullying or harassing another Aggressive Illegal downloading
Hacking
Gambling
Financial scams
Terrorism Commercial Conduct (child as actor) What risks should we be guarding against? know about the updated e-safety guidance for QTS standard Q21: Health and well-being? know how to conduct themselves professionally online? know how to protect themselves online? know how to keep data safe and secure? know how to escalate an issue of concern? receive regular training and updates? understand e-safety issues and risks? Do all your staff… Is your school e-safe? Table developed by the EUKids Online project
and referenced in paragraph 1.3 of the Byron Review. Bias
Racist
Misleading info or advice Values Pornographic or unwelcome sexual content Sexual Violent / hateful content Aggressive Adverts
Spam
Sponsorship
Personal info Commercial Content (child as recipient) What risks should we be guarding against? raise awareness of the issues, e.g. through holding an assembly? handle cyberbullying issues well? keep an incident log and monitor your measures? include e-safety measures in your SEF? use an accredited supplier for internet services? have a robust AUP? audit its e-safety measures? have a nominated e-safety co-ordinator? Does your school… Is your school e-safe? Table developed by the EUKids Online project
and referenced in paragraph 1.3 of the Byron Review. Self harm
Unwelcome persuasions Values Meeting strangers
Being groomed Sexual Being bullied, harassed or stalked Aggressive Tracking
Harvesting personal info Commercial Contact (child as participant) What risks should we be guarding against? OFSTED

Any school which receives a grade 4 for Safeguarding will automatically be given Notice to Improve.

These arrangements 'raise the bar' about the importance of Safeguarding for schools and will also facilitate the identification and dissemination of best practice. Lois’s ‘friends’ have been collected by sharing address books.
She only knows about one third of the people in her contact list.
She has used the features in MSN to sort her ‘friends’ into groups – school, home friends, family, holiday mates.
She also has a group for ‘friends of friends’ i.e. internet strangers.
She does not give out any personal details to these people.
She is happy to chat online with friends of friends, but nothing more.
She does not use her web cam when she talks to this group. Lois’s friend offers to share their Instant Messenger (like MSN) contacts. Lois is very pleased because she now has 150 ‘friends’. Parental query: staff using own ICT devices to capture pictures or contact pupils (legitimately!!)

Staff personal online profiles revealing personal details to all – including pupils and their parents!

Staff subjected to cyberbullying attacks by pupils

‘Their partner downloaded porn on the school’s laptop’ - primary head teacher


‘The monitoring software recorded tens of thousands of violations in a two week period’ - secondary head teacher

‘There’s a website created by my pupils listing children no one likes and their parents are telling me to do something about it’ - primary head teacher


‘The children use their mobile phones to send porn via bluetooth’ - primary head teacher Are you prepared for the following? It can help improve learning and achievement in all areas
Children enjoy technology and are more engaged in their learning because it’s both motivational and fun
It helps children to be more creative and independent in their learning
It can improve their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills
It helps parents, carers and schools to keep in touch and work together to support children’s learning Why is learning with technology a good thing? Sophie doesn’t go online for a few days.
She doesn’t talk to anyone: she’s too embarrassed to talk to anyone face to face.
She remembers a lesson at school where she learnt about a red button, so she looks in MSN and finds it. It says ‘report abuse’.
She types all the details into the form. She feels better for having told someone. She doesn’t talk to her ‘boyfriend’ again. For a while Sophie has been chatting online, in secret, with someone older than her. At first he seemed really nice and appeared to understand her better than her family. She knew it was silly, but she found it easy to tell him lots of personal things, and she was pleased to have an ‘older boyfriend’ online. But now he is sending her very personal and ’explicit’ messages which make her feel uncomfortable and uneasy about the ‘relationship’. James is sitting with his Mum; they are using the internet together. James’ Mum explains he should never give out his private information to anyone, and, if he is not sure, he should talk to a grown-up at home or at school. James is 7 years old. He’s in a chat room – a pizza parlour in a ‘virtual’ world. Someone is ‘talking’ to him and asks if he wants to chat ‘outside’ and can they swap email addresses? Escalate High Risk
- to the service provider
- report abuse
- involve LA support services

Encourage safe behaviour – Medium to low risk
The young person should be supported to stop the activity, or take no further action

There is little or no danger to the young person - Low/No risk The activity is one they may continue with Protecting children whilst they are in our care and educating them for when they are not!

e-safety is a child safety – not an ICT – issue! Ofsted SEF Question ? includes:
To what extent do learners feel safe and adopt safe practices?

For example:

the extent to which learners adopt safe and responsible practices, dealing sensibly with risk, in a range of activities within and outside the classroom, including the use of new technologies and the internet. Jack likes his friend and would like to meet him.
He tells him he’ll see him on Saturday and he’ll be bringing his dad.
His friend says ‘OK’ and that his dad will be there too.
They have a good kick about in the park and the dads find a coffee stall! Jack has been talking to an online ‘friend’ for some time. The ‘friend’ seems really nice and they have loads in common. They’ve sent Jack a photo of themselves. It’s the holiday and they ask Jack to meet in the park. Use the scenario cards on your table
Rate each one… Table Exercise:
Assessing the risk Who is responsible for teaching e-safety?
How can parents be involved?
What support is there in the event of a ‘disclosure’?
Advent of 3G and ‘mobile internet’
Data security – PASSWORDS!
External issues being brought inside
eg cyberbullying
Protection for staff – AUP’s
Update your SEF!
At what age should internet safety lessons start? Issues to consider
Becta’s Schools website http://www.becta.org.uk/schools/esafety Main recommendations:
E-safety co-ordinator
Policy and management team
Roles and responsibilities
Checklists of AUPs
Incident log

Safetynet discussion forum Policy and practice - what help is available? What should your school be doing? know how to report any concerns they may have? know the SMART rules? get the opportunity to improve their digital literacy skills? receive e-safety education at appropriate places across the curriculum? understand what safe and responsible online behaviour means? Do your learners… Is your school e-safe? “...in all schools action is taken at a whole-school level to ensure that e-safety is mainstreamed throughout the school’s teaching, learning and other practices. In particular I recommend that:

Government should encourage schools to use Becta’s self-review framework to drive continual improvement in schools’ use of ICT including with regard to e-safety.

100% of schools should have AUPs that are regularly reviewed, monitored and agreed with parents and students. Guidance on this should be incorporated in Becta’s revised self-review framework.” The Byron Review Ofsted Self Evaluation Form Schools have a duty of care Why do I need to take action? If not, why not?
Take action now understand how to protect their children in the home? receive regular training and updates? understand their roles and responsibilities? understand e-safety issues and risks? Do your parents and governors… Is your school e-safe? know about the updated e-safety guidance for QTS standard Q21: Health and well-being? know how to conduct themselves professionally online? know how to protect themselves online? know how to keep data safe and secure? know how to escalate an issue of concern? receive regular training and updates? understand e-safety issues and risks? Do all your staff… Is your school e-safe? Table developed by the EUKids Online project
and referenced in paragraph 1.3 of the Byron Review. Providing misleading info or advice Values Creating and uploading inappropriate material Sexual Bullying or harassing another Aggressive Illegal downloading
Hacking
Gambling
Financial scams
Terrorism Commercial Conduct (child as actor) What risks should we be guarding against? Table developed by the EUKids Online project
and referenced in paragraph 1.3 of the Byron Review. Self harm
Unwelcome persuasions Values Meeting strangers
Being groomed Sexual Being bullied, harassed or stalked Aggressive Tracking
Harvesting personal info Commercial Contact (child as participant) What risks should we be guarding against? Table developed by the EUKids Online project
and referenced in paragraph 1.3 of the Byron Review. Bias
Racist
Misleading info or advice Values Pornographic or unwelcome sexual content Sexual Violent / hateful content Aggressive Adverts
Spam
Sponsorship
Personal info Commercial Content (child as recipient) What risks should we be guarding against? raise awareness of the issues, e.g. through holding an assembly? handle cyberbullying issues well? keep an incident log and monitor your measures? include e-safety measures in your SEF? use an accredited supplier for internet services? have a robust AUP? audit its e-safety measures? have a nominated e-safety co-ordinator? Does your school… Is your school e-safe?
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