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Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

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by

Ginny Wright

on 10 November 2014

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Transcript of Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

Explanation of Symbol: This symbol of sparks represents the event because it represents the sparks that are needed to create a flame. In rhe book this event is sparks because it is the foundation to the plot of the story.
Quote: "She popped it open, and Henry's heart beat a little faster as he saw it for what it was. A Japanese parasol. made from bamboo, bright red and white- with orange koi painted on it, carp that looked like giant goldfish" (Ford 6).
Event 7: Henry Sees the Parasol
Event 8: Henry Looks For the Parasol
Quote: "Aside from the parasol that was brought up the first day, nothing looked even remotely familiar, but then he couldn't be sure if the bamboo umbrella had been Keiko's or not. He'd seen it only in an old black-and-white photograph of her as a child, what, forty years ago? Yet, as much as he tried to dismiss it as sheer coincidence, his heart told him otherwise. It was her (Ford 67)
Event 2: The Evacuation Signs
Quote: "Henry looked at the paper in Keiko's hand. The bold type screamed: INSTRUCTIONS TO ALL PERSONS OF JAPANESE ANCESTRY. It was all about Japanese families being forced to evacuate, for their own safety. They had only a few days and could bring next to nothing- only what they could carry. At the bottom, it was signed by the president of the United States and the secretary of war" (Ford 124).
Event 1: Henry Meets Keiko
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
Explanation of Event: The event in which Henry sees the Japanese parasol is important because it wants the reader to continue reading. It causes the reader to think and wonder, why did Henry's heart beat faster when he saw the parasol? This event also creates a foundation for the plot of the story. It gives an opportunity for events to be written throughout the story that can give an explanation as to Henry reacted in the way that he did. The perspective in this event of Henry being grown creates a mature and reflective tone. Thus event is a falling action in the story. This event effect the young Henry perspective because this parasol belonged to a person that had a large impact on his childood.
Explanation of event: This event is important because it will lead to a relationship that will be a main component to the plot of the story. This event serves as the exposition in this story. This event will lead to conflicts both external and internal throughout the story. The perspective in this event of young Henry causes the innocence of finding a person you like to be enhanced. This effects the old Henry perspective because this would be a person who effects the rest of his life.
Quote: "Like most boys his age, Henry liked girls a lot more than he could bring himself to admit- or actually show to anyone, especially around other boys, who all tried to act cool, as if girls were some strange new species. So while he did what came naturally, trying his best to show indifference, he was secretly elated to have a friendly face in the kitchen. 'I'm Henry Lee. From South King Street.' The peculiar girl whispered 'I'm Keiko' (Ford 19).
Explanation of Symbol: This symbol represents this event because it shows the start of smething new. In this image a baby is the start of a new life. I the sotry the ecent in which Henry meets Keiko represents the start of a new relationship and plot.
Explanation of Event: This event is important because shows indirect characterization of Henry. This event is a falling action in this story. It also supports the event in which Henry firth saw the parasol at the beginning of the story. The perspective of old Henry in this event allows the reader to make connections to events when Henry was young. This event effects the young Henry perspective because Keiko was his true love when he was young.
Explanation of Symbol: This symbolizes the event because it shows that Henry was investigating to uncover memories of when he was young
Explanation of Event: This event is important because it shows a historical connection in the story. It is bringing out Order 9066 in the story. This is also creating a large conflict in the story. The perspective of young Henry effects the passage by bringing out the confusion that young people feel when events such as this occur. This effects the old Henry perspective because the girl he loves will be taken from him which will effect the rest of his life.
Explanation of Symbol: This symbol represents this event because it represents the emotions that Henry, Keiko, and Keiko's family must have felt. They felt broken and crushed. Just as a broken object, such as a plate.
Event 9:Henry Finds Keiko's Sketchbook
Quote: Henry swallowed hard and caught his breath, no longer aware of the dust from the basement tickling his nose or making him want to scratch his eyes. He didn't feel the dryness anymore. He touched the lines on the page, feeling the pencil marks, the texture of the graphite smoothed out to define shadow and light. He took the small sketchbook from his son and turned the page. Pressed in it were cherry blossoms, old and dried, brown and brittle. Pieces of something that had once been so completely alive" (Ford 142).
Explanation of Event: This event is important because Henry accomplished something he was working toward. He had found something that would bring a connection to his childhood. In this story, this event is a falling action. The perspective of Old Henry brings about a bitter-sweet tone in this passage. This effects the young Henry perspective because it is memories inside the sketchbook from when Henry was young.
Explanation of Symbol: This symbol represents this event because it shows that Henry has accomplished something he has been striving for. Just as it would be when a runner completes a race.
Event 3: Henry Visits Keiko at Camp Harmony
Quote: "Henry watched and waited until he saw a beautiful slip of girl walk up the muddy path in a faded yellow dress, red galoshes covered in mud, and a brown raincoat. She stood on the other side if the fence, her smiling face, pale from food poisoning, framed by cold metal and sharp wire. A captured butterfly. Henry simled and exhaled slowly"(Ford 162).
Explanation of Event: In this event Henry goes to meet Keiko at camp she has been put in. This event is important because it shows the strength of the relationship between Henry and Keiko. This event serves as rising action in this story. The perspective in this passage of young Henry. enhances the emotions experienced in young love. This event effects the old Henry perspective because it gives him something that he can use as a life lesson throughout his life.
Explanation of Symbol: This symbol represents the event because it shows that Henry and Keiko are not just going to give up on the relationship that hey have. It shows Henry and Keiko will always find each other. Just as magnets find each other when they are separated.
Event 4: Henry's Parents Find Keiko's Pictures
Quote: "Henry whistled as he opened the door to his little apartment and saw his parents. That was when his pursed lips fell silent and Henry lost his breath. Both of them sat at their tiny kitchen table. Spread across the table were Keiko's family albums. The ones he'd so carefully hidden beneath his dresser drawers. Hundreds of photos of Japanese families, some in traditional dress, others in military uniforms. Piles and piles od black-and-white images. Few of the people in them were smiling. But none looked as dour as his parents-their faces cemented in expressions of shock, shame, and betrayal" (Ford 182).
Explanation of Event: In this event Henry comes home to find that his parents had found the photo albums he was hiding for Keiko. This enhances the plot of the story by enhancing a previous conflict that Henry was experiencing. This event serves as a rising action in this story leading to the climax. This event effects the young perspective of Henry by causing him to have to grow up and stand up to his parents for what he believes. This event effects the old perspective of Henry by causing the relationship and the memories of his childhood to be painful.
Explanation of Symbol: This image of a falling building symbolizes this event by representing everything Henry had done crumbling down. Henry had worked hard to hide his relationship from Keiko. He had worked especially hard to hide the photos from his parents. He had done so well and things were going wonderful for him. Until, his parents founds the pictures and everything he had worked for came crumbling down at his feet.
Event 5:Henry Visits Keiko At Camp Minidoka
Quote: "Finding the camp was easy-in a way that made Henry feel more than a little saddened. As he and Sheldon stepped off the bus in Jerome, Henry couldn't help but notice an enormous sign that read 'Minidoka Wartime Relocation Center- 18 miles.' There were dozens of people loading into trucks and cars, all bound for what had become the seventh largest city in Idaho" (Ford 216).
Explanation of Event: In this event Henry travels from Seattle to Idaho to visit Keiko at her new camp. I feel this event is the climax of the story because not only does it show how much Henry loves Keiko but it also shows that Henry is breaking away from the strict rules of his parents. He was not afraid of his parents being angry at him for making the long journey he had become old enough to make decisions for himself. This effects the young Henry perspective by making Henry grow in maturity. This effects the old Henry perspective by giving him another momory to look back on.
Explanation of Symbol: This symbol of broken chains represents Henry breaking away from the strict rules of his parents to go see Keiko. Such as a prisoner would break their chains to be free from bondage.
Event 6: Henry meets Ethel
Quote: "'Thank you.' Henry was touched. His disappointment melted away. 'I...I don't even know your name.' Her smile brightened 'I'm Ethel...Ethel Chen.'" (Ford 256)
Explanation of Event: In this event, Henry meets Ethel. Who is the woman he will end up marrying. This event is a falling action in the story because all of the puzzle pieces are starting to fall together. This effects the young Henry perspective by causing him to experience young love again while still getting over a heartbreak. This effects the old Henry perspective because Ethel would grow to be the woman he marries.
Explanation of symbol: This symbol is a heart-shaped puzzle. This represents this event because it shows that the puzzle pieces as to how Henry and Ethel met are coming together. It also shows that Ethel would be helping cure Henry's broken heart from Keiko.
Event 10: Henry meets Keiko Again
Quote: "Looking at the address Marty had given to him, Henry went inside and found and found himself on the eight floor, a Chinese lucky number. Standing in the hallway, he stared at the door of Kay Hatsune, a widow of three years. Henry didn't know what had happened to her husband. If Marty knew, he hadn't said. Just that Kay was indeed...Keiko" (Ford 283).
Explanation of Event: In this event Old Henry goes and finds Keiko after years of not seeing her. This even is the conclusion of the story because all of the conflicts in the story have come to an end. This effects the young Henry perspective by bringing memories from Henry's childhood back up. This effects the old Henry perspective by bringing the love of his life back into his life.
Explanation of Symbol: This symbol represents this event because as Henry reunites with Keiko he is looking back on his old life. Just as someone who is grown would look back at their baby book. In each scenario the person is looking back on their past life.
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