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A Nation is Born

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Alyssa Connor

on 27 August 2013

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Transcript of A Nation is Born

A Nation is Born
The American Revolution

How was the American Revolution influenced by literary works?
Important Historical Events and their Impact
Road to Revolution
1754 - French and Indian War
Expensive war for Britain means heavy taxes for colonists.
1765 - Stamp Act
Tax on all finished products
1765 - Quartering Act
Colonists required to house and feed British troops. Also a means of spying on the colonies.
1773 - Tea Act
All tea held in the Boston Harbor as tea taxes went up. Leads to Sam Adam's Boston Tea Party.
1774 - 1st Continental Congress
Delagates from twelve of the thirteen colonies discuss the Intolerable Acts. Agreed to met again in one year if something happened.
The Revolution
1775 - The American Revolutionary War Begins
At first, a war between Britain and the 13 colonies, but quickly grew into a world war with France and Spain joining the colonists.
1775 - 2nd Continental Congress
Reps. from all thirteen colonies managed the colonial war effort and began moving towards independence.
1776 - Deceleration of Independence
Written by Thomas Jefferson, it announced their separation from Great Britain and regarded themselves a new nation - The United States of America.
1781
Following the Siege of Yorktown, General Cornwallis surrenders to General Washington, ending the armed portion of the American Revolution.
1783 - Treaty of Paris
Formal end to the war
Post War
1787 - Constitution
Seven articles to the constitution: 1-3 articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, the 4th and 6th articles frame the doctrine of federalism, the 5th article provides the procedure for amending the Constitution, the 7th article provides the procedure for ratifying the Constitution.
1789 - 1st President
George Washington takes the oath of office as the first President of the United States.
Predominant Genres and Themes
Independence
Public Writing
Mind of nation on politics
Journalism = expression
Nature of the government
Political writing
Stylistic Approach and Devices
Major Authors and Biographies
Diction
- The choice and use of words and phrases in speech or writing.
=
Charged Words
- Type of words that evoke an emotional response.
=These words make writing more memorable and are usually used to make something more forceful. After reading, charged words you stop thinking and your emotion takes over.
Audience
- The listeners at a speech or the intended readers of a piece of writing.
= Anyone who could read or listen to someone read is an audience.
Personification
- Giving human qualities and characteristics to inhuman objects.
= Found often in poems and classic literature. During the Revolution, the colonial writers would compare England's King to pretty awful things.
Poem of Praise
- Poems praising certain people or things for their acts.
= War heroes and people of great worth
Restatement
- Stating something again and again.
= Repeating the words to emphasize their importance.
Repetition
- Rephrasing and idea using different words
= Many famous speeches use repetition as a sort of rally or battle cry, making an issue more important to the audience.
Parallelism
- Repeatedly using the same structure of sentences and phrases.
= Parallelism creates a rhythm for the audience, making the writing more direct.
Rhetorical Question
- A question needing no answer.
= Used especially for dramatic effect, making the audience pause and question what they have just heard.
Ben Franklin
Speech in the Covention by Benjamin Franklin
(Follow along on page 191-192 in your textbooks)
Thomas Jefferson
The Deceleration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson
(Pages 156-159)
Thomas Paine
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
(Chapter One)
Patrick Henery
Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death by Patrick Henery
Phillis Wheatly
To His Excellency General Washington by Phillis Wheatley
(pg. 174-176)
Celestial choir! enthron'd in realms of light,
Columbia's scenes of glorious toils I write.
While freedom's cause her anxious breast alarms,
She flashes dreadful in refulgent arms.
See mother earth her offspring's fate bemoan,
And nations gaze at scenes before unknown!
See the bright beams of heaven's revolving light
Involved in sorrows and veil of night!
The goddess comes, she moves divinely fair,
Olive and laurel bind her golden hair:
Wherever shines this native of the skies,
Unnumber'd charms and recent graces rise.
Muse! bow propitious while my pen relates
How pour her armies through a thousand gates,
As when Eolus heaven's fair face deforms,
Enwrapp'd in tempest and a night of storms;
Astonish'd ocean feels the wild uproar,
The refluent surges beat the sounding shore;
Or thick as leaves in Autumn's golden reign,
Such, and so many, moves the warrior's train.
In bright array they seek the work of war,
Where high unfurl'd the ensign waves in air.
Shall I to Washington their praise recite?
Enough thou know'st them in the fields of fight.
Thee, first in peace and honours,—we demand
The grace and glory of thy martial band.
Fam'd for thy valour, for thy virtues more,
Hear every tongue thy guardian aid implore!
One century scarce perform'd its destined round,
When Gallic powers Columbia's fury found;
And so may you, whoever dares disgrace
The land of freedom's heaven-defended race!
Fix'd are the eyes of the nations on the scales,
For in their hopes Columbia's arm prevails.
Anon Britannia droops the pensive head,
While round increase the rising hills of dead.
Ah! cruel blindness to Columbia's state!
Lament thy thirst of boundless power too late.
Proceed, great chief, with virtue on thy side,40
Thy ev'ry action let the goddess guide.
A crown, a mansion, and a throne that shine,
With gold unfading, WASHINGTON! be thine.
Works Cited
Franklin, Benjamin. "Speech in the Convention."
Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Kinsella, Kate, Kevin Feldman, Colleen Shea Stump, Joyce Armstrong Carroll, and Edward E. Wilson, eds. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice Hall, 2004. 191-192. Print.
Henery, Pattrick. Prentice Hall Literature:
Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Kinsells, Kate, Kevin Feldman, Colleen Shea Stump, Joyce Armstrong Carroll, and Edward E. Wilson, eds. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice Hall, 2004. 187-190. Print.
Jefferson, Thomas. "Deceleration of
Independence." Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Kinsells, Kate, Kevin Feldman, Colleen Shea Stump, Joyce Armstrong Carroll, and Edward E. Wilson, eds. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice Hall, 2004. 156-159. Print.
Paine, Thomas. Prentice Hall Literature:
Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Kinsells, Kate, Kevin Feldman, Colleen Shea Stump, Joyce Armstrong Carroll, and Edward E. Wilson, eds. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice Hall, 2004. 160-162. Print.
Wheatley, Phillis. "To His Excellancy, General
Washington." Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Kinsells, Kate, Kevin Feldman, Colleen Shea Stump, Joyce Armstrong Carroll, and Edward E. Wilson, eds. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice Hall, 2004. 174-176. Print.
Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices,
Timeless Themes. Kinsells, Kate, Kevin Feldman, Colleen Shea Stump, Joyce Armstrong Carroll, and Edward E. Wilson, eds. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice Hall, 2004. 124-186. Print.
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