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Guy Fawkes Day

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by

Anna Kościelecka

on 29 October 2011

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Transcript of Guy Fawkes Day

Guy Fawkes
Day How this holiday is celebrated now? Guy Faweks Guy Fawkes Night Also known as Guy Fawkes Night
and Bonfire Night Guy Fawkes Day has been celebrated in Britain, now, for almost four hundred years. On November the fifth every year, they build bonfires and they set off fireworks. In fact, November the fifth is the only day of the year that they traditionally have fireworks. They also eat traditional food such as baked potatoes and toffee apples. And they also make a dummy of Guy Fawkes from old clothes and newspapers, and this is put on top of the bonfire. Guy Fawkes (13 April 1570 – 31 January 1606), also known as Guido Fawkes, the name he adopted while fighting for the Spanish in the Low Countries, belonged to a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Its history begins with the events of 5 November 1605, when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested while guarding explosives the plotters had placed beneath the House of Lords. Celebrating the fact that King James I had survived the attempt on his life, people lit bonfires around London, and months later the introduction of the Observance of 5th November Act enforced an annual public day of thanksgiving for the plot's failure. REMEMBER, REMEMBER THE FIFTH OF NOVEMBER

(Traditional English Rhyme - 17th Century)
Remember, remember the fifth of November
Gunpowder, treason and plot
I see no reason why gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot

Guy Fawkes, Guy Fawkes, 'twas his intent
To blow up the King and the Parliament
Three score barrels of powder below
Poor old England to overthrow
By God's providence he was catched
With a dark lantern and burning match
Holloa boys, holloa boys
God save the King!
Hip hip hooray!
Hip hip hooray!

A penny loaf to feed ol' Pope
A farthing cheese to choke him
A pint of beer to rinse it down
A faggot of sticks to burn him
Burn him in a tub of tar
Burn him like a blazing star
Burn his body from his head
Then we'll say ol' Pope is dead.
Hip hip hooray!
Hip hip hooray!
Full transcript