Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Cordillera vocal and instrumental music

No description
by

Louis Luyun

on 4 December 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Cordillera vocal and instrumental music

Introduction
It is performed in leader/chorus style in which the reciter, often an elderly woman, occupies a key position in society. It is full of repetitions, synonyms, figurative terms and metaphors.
Instruments used in making songs in Cordillera:
Bamboo Stamping Tubes (Tongatong)
Bamboo Pipes in a Row (Saggeypo)
Bamboo Buzzers (Bungkaka)
Bamboo Jew’s Harp (Kubing)
Gongs (Gangsa Topayya and Palook)
Bamboo Stamping Tubes (Tongatong)
Bamboo stamping tubes are banged on the ground to produce surprisingly clear resonant pitched notes which are delightful to listen to. They are made from giant diameter bamboo,the ones in the above picture are up to a meter in length-so the tones sound low and woody.Different length tubes produce different notes so a set can be distributed round a group of people to play together like handbells.Any tunings can be specified. They are very easy to play, and are therefore ideal for children or people with learning difficulties.
What is Hudhud?
Hudhud (Chanted Epic Poetry) is a chant of the Ifugao people, which is recited during the sowing and harvesting of rice, funeral wakes, and other rituals. Thought to have originated before the seventh century, it is comprised of 40 episodes and often takes three or four days to recite.
Cordillera vocal and instrumental music
Like in other parts of the Philippines, different kinds of music are made to honor their god/goddess. Others are made for lucks or for celebrating a special event.
Types of music found in Cordillera:
Instrumental
Vocal
Vocal Music:
Hudhud
Some of the music came from these parts of Cordillera:
Apayao
Bontok
Ibaloi
Ifugao
Kalinga
Tingguian
Composition:
Chanted Poetry,
Songs (children’s songs, lullaby, spirit songs, narrative legends), Dances

Social Functions:
Music for Worship and Rituals,
Work (Planting),
Sleep, Courtship

Bamboo Pipes in a Row (Saggeypo)
Bamboo Buzzers (Bungkaka)
A percussion instrument (idiophone) made out of bamboo common in numerous indigenous tribes around the Philippines such as the Ifugao, Kalinga, and Ibaloi.
Bamboo Jew’s Harp (Kubing)
Made of bamboo; Made of bamboo; the instrument is held horizontally with the bamboo tongue in front of the opened mouth. The left end is hit by the thumb of the right hand. This makes the bamboo tongue vibrate which causes a sound.
The mouth serves as a resonator and by changing the shape and size of the mouth opening, the overtones can be changed, thus creating a melody. By strongly breathing in or out the volume can be changed as well.
Patteteg (Bamboo Leg Xylophones)
Short Xylophones - Leg Height, used in performing traditional songs and dances.
Gongs (Gangsa Topayya and Palook)
Handmade instruments used in performing Rituals.
Full transcript