Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

1984: Themes, Symbols, and Motifs

No description
by

Susan Lee

on 7 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 1984: Themes, Symbols, and Motifs

1984 Themes Symbols Motifs The Dangers of Totalitarianism "1984" was written by Orwell to introduce the cruelties that are connected with totalitarian governments.
At that time, the Soviet Union was in full power and, communism was still a concept supported by many people. Orwell's story represents a reality in which totalitarianism was allowed to take over the world unopposed. Control of Information and History The Party has total control of all information.
They can manipulate history however they want. By controlling the present, the Party can manipulate the past. And by controlling the past, the Party can justify their actions in the present. Psychological Manipulation Citizens are constantly barraged with images and messages that are designed to leave no room for independent thought. The omnipresent telescreens are constantly blaring messages about the Party's anthems and victories. There are signs everywhere saying "BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU" reminding citizens that they are being monitored wherever they go. The Glass Paperweight The paperweight Winston buys at Mr. Charrington's shop represents a connection to the past; a time before the Party took over. Winston imagines meeting O'Brien in a "place where there is no darkness"
Full transcript