Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Writing Process

No description
by

TAMIU Writing Center

on 13 October 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Writing Process

*Group similar information together using visual clues such as highlighting, underlining, and circling.

DRAFTING
PRE-WRITING
THE WRITING
PROCESS
REVISING
PROOFREADING
Who will be reading this paper?
How much do they know about the topic?
What social or personal characteristics— such as age, culture, politics, etc.—might affect their reading of the paper?

Based on audience, consider tone:
Is the audience assigned to a professor or friend?
Is the writing formal or informal?

CONSIDER the AUDIENCE
ORGANIZATION
*Try concept maps (clustering) or
diagrams.
*Flashcards are ideal for writing
notes and for moving ideas around.
DEVELOPING A THESIS STATEMENT
Consider the thesis statement as a “road map”; it lays out what the reader should expect .
A thesis:
Is arguable
Provides answers to
specific problems or
questions
Maintains focus on
the topic

OUTLINING
Out of
these sections, group
main
points.
Based on your research and and evidence, add supporting ideas and evidence.
EFFECTIVE INTRODUCTIONS:
Catch the reader’s attention
Clearly introduce the topic
Contain the thesis statement
As a hook:
Refer to current events
Tell a story or personal anecdote
Use a quote
Make a startling statement
Pose an unexpected, but relevant question

Start With a Topic Sentence
Think of this like a mini-thesis.
What will the paragraph be about?
1. Anecdote- A personal experience
2. Statistics- Use of numbers
3. Authority/Expert- ex. Information from a doctor
4 Analogy- Comparison between two things
5. Hypothetical Situation- Prediction/ "What if..."
Five Types of Evidence for Body Paragraphs:
EXPLANATION
Explain what the quote means.
How does the quote prove/support the thesis?
End with a concluding sentence.
Keep it brief
EFFECTIVE CONCLUSIONS:
Return to and reemphasize the main idea
Provide a sense of closure
Conclusions can:
Call for action
Issue a warning
Use a relevant quote
Rewrite the Introduction
WHILE REVISING...
Add, delete, or rearrange information.
PROOFREADING & EDITING
Correct mistakes in:
Spelling
Grammar
Punctuation
Other mechanical errors
Review proper citation
Use writer's handbook, TAMIU Writing Center handouts, or ask
TAMIU Writing Center consultants for help.
EFFECTIVE BODY PARAGRAPHS:
TAMIU Writing Center Presents:
Thank You!
VISIT tHE
WRITING CENTER!
Make an appointment to guarantee time slot.
Appointments are made 24 hours in advance.
Walk-ins are welcome.
Call: 326-2884 or 326-2883
Email: writingcenter@tamiu.edu
Visit: Cowart Hall 203
Arrange
information
into
sections.
Ensure paper supports the thesis.
Include transitions between paragraphs.
Don't be surprised if revised draft is dramatically different from original.
Revise more than once.
Have Effective:
Introductions
Body Paragraphs
Conclusions
Do this before actually writing a full essay.
Choose and narrow a topic by doing the following:
Brainstorm
Free write
List
Assess the audience and purpose.
Research the topic.
Develop a thesis statement.
Organize and Outline your ideas.

This is where the writing begins!
(MLA, APA, Chicago, etc)
IN 4 EASY STEPS
Use the arrow keys below to navigate to & fro.
writing can be a tough process, but it doesn't have to be.


these four easy-to-follow steps cover all things pre-writing, drafting, revising, and proofreading with helpful examples included for further instruction.
Full transcript