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1960's Fads

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by

Sarah Haluschak

on 20 March 2014

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Transcript of 1960's Fads

Afros and Bouffants
"Fashion is made to become unfashionable."
-- Coco Chanel
Lava Lamps vs. Black Lights
Hairstyles:
1 June 1960
Invented by Edward Craven Walker
Made in England, originally called "Astro Lamps".
Used not as light but to create a mood.
The lava lamps had been brought to the U.S. in the late 1960's.
Renamed Lava Brand Motion Lamps, production took of.
Lava Lamps made in the 1960's remain as prized collectables throughout the years.
1965
Invented by William H. Byler
Lamp that emits ultraviolet light.
Dyes on the glass tubing gives a unique appearance.
Originally used for entertainment in the 1960's.
Used today in forensic science and other fields.
Robert Williams Wood invented the colored glass or "Wood's Glass."
The two most popular hairstyles in the 1960s was the afro and the bouffant
The bouffant, trademarked by Jackie Kennedy, was a voluminous hairstyle that was difficult to achieve and required lots of teasing and hairspray.
The bouffant trend ended after President Kennedy's assassination
The afro was a big frizzy hairstyle worn by men and women alike, but usually associated with African Americans.
$1000.25
Monday, February 17, 1969
Vol XCIII, No. 311
Tie Dye and Bellbottoms
Hippie Style Gains Popularity!
"Hippies" wore bellbottom jeans which flared out at the bottom
Tie-dye also became a popular trend, which people could create at home
People began wearing tie-dye teeshirts with flowers and other designs on them
It became popular to wear hair in the afro style for both men and women
Other hippies (men and women) wore their hair long and straight, parted in the middle
Turtlenecks
1960's Fads & Fashions
Turtleneck sweaters were a new fashion statement that became a staple in 1960's fashion
1967 was named "The Year of the Turtle" by the fashion magazine The Daily News Record
People wore turtlenecks because they could be both a formal alternative to the shirt and tie, and a more informal garment
First popularized by beatniks and flower children, but then became more mainstream
Turtlenecks haven't faded into oblivion like most fads, but their peak popularity occurred in the 60's
It became increasingly popular in the 1960's to dress like a hippie
Miniskirts
Miniskirts and minidresses were a sign of women's liberation
Miniskirts were short skirts with the hemline well above the knees, usually about halfway up the thigh
They achieved the height of their popularity in 1967.
It was "in" to dress more suggestively as a sign of rebellion
Designer Mary Quant started experimenting with shorter skirts in 1964, and her creations soon became a trend
Huge designers like Yves St. Laurent caught on and miniskirts were not only seen everywhere on the streets, but also on the runways
This new scandalous style was popular among young women
Hula Hoop
1960's Slang
"Be there or be square!" - Cool people will be gathering
"Beat it!" - Go away
"Fab Four" - The Beatles
"Dance holes in your soles" - Dance energetically, for a long time
"The Fuzz" - The police
"Idiot stick" - An insult to someone who isn't smart
March 5, 1963
Arthur Melin patent his version of the Hula Hoop.
Made in a Wham-O company, famous for selling toys.
Twenty million Wham-O hoops sold for $1.98 in the first six months.
The Hula Hoops has become a toy for children and also used by adults to gain world records.
*Japan once banned the hula hoop because the rotating hip action seemed indecent.
Bibliography
"Turtleneck Sweaters."
The Bad Fads Museum RSS.
N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2014.
Troll Dolls
Originally invented before the 1960's by Thomas Dam.
The dolls are also referred to as Dam Dolls.
Became one of the United States' biggest toy fads in the early 1960's.
The original Dam Dolls were of high quality, made with sheep wool hair and glass eyes.
The sudden popularity resulted in cheap knock-offs.
Skateboarding
By the 1960's a small number of surfing manufactures were open in California.
They began making skateboards that resembled surf boards.
The growth in popularity grew between 1963 and 1965.
During these years, sales for Makaha quoted $10 million in board sales.
Sales dropped in 1966 and remain low until 1970's because it was viewed as dangerous.
"Fads of the 1960s."
Crazyfads.com.
N.p.,n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2014"

"Fads throughout Time."
Timetoast
. Timetoast, Jan. 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2014.
Monteith, Sharon.
American Culture in the 1960s
. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2008. Print.
"Everyone can be beautiful."

-Dorothy Hoobler
Farber, David R., and Beth L. Bailey.
The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s.
New York: Columbia UP, 2001. Print.
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