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Offenders

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by

Brittany Schick

on 3 December 2013

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Transcript of Offenders

Passwords

Gender-neutral names

Risky Behaviors

Be vigilant about disclosure of personal information


Self-Prevention
Prevention

CYBERSTALKING

By: Brittany Schick, Christine Vo, Zachary Douglass and Zena Griffith







1. Exposure to Motivated Offenders

2. Online Proximity

3. Online Guardianship

4. Online Target Attractiveness

5. Online Deviant Lifestyle

Risk Factors

UCF Student: Cyberstalking Victim
Victims/Offenders
Effectiveness/Perceptions
What is Cyberstalking?
Michigan 1993

Not the most effective: burden falls on the victim to prove
Laws
Set policies or code of conduct for site

Monitor and sanction

'Report User' button
Internet Service Providers and Service Managers
History
Privacy Settings
Victims
There is no unique profile.
The most targeted are females age 18-29
4 Types of Cyberstalker
-Vindictive Cyberstalker; known for their wildness and fury
-Composed Cyberstalker or the internet "trollers"
-Intimate Cyberstalker
-Collective Cyberstalker
Stalking
A pattern of behavior directed at a specific person that would reasonably cause fear
Technology
email
calling
texting
GPS trackers
social media
Cyberstalking, also known as cyber harassment, is a form of online violence
Many people don't think that cyberstalking results in serious outcomes
Mental and physical harm
Financial burdens
Fatality
As technology advances, it has become easier for the stalker to target his/her victim with complete anonymity
Both traditional stalking and cyberstalking share some of the same characteristics but cyberstalking has become more dangerous than its originator
Cyberstalking is viewed as a crime of opportunity
The criminal justice system makes victims of this crime feel insignificant as if their unimportant in the eyes of the law.
People Indirectly Effected
Children: Parents don't feel safe letting them play or taking them certain places

Relative: the victim might retract and not want visit certain people or go places they once did

Friends: A once outgoing and carefree person may no longer feel safe going out in public, afriaf of who they might encounter

Colleagues: A victim might withdraw from the workplace, opting to work from home if given the option or switching employers altogether for fear that her offender could be in the workplace
Cyberstalking began when people figured out how to use technology for stalking purposes.

1999 Attorney General's report for vice-president Al Gore
Laws
Cyberstalking was originally charged under stalking or harassment laws.
California was first to have stalking law.
All 50 states have laws for stalking now and 37 have laws specific to cyberstalking
Full transcript