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Challenging Gender Stereotypes

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evan cohen

on 4 November 2014

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Transcript of Challenging Gender Stereotypes

Challenging Gender Stereotypes
Through Literature and Media

By:
Evan Cohen
Karen Mahoney
Aaron Ogilvie

A Literature Study for Fifth Graders
Research That Informed Our Lessons
Challenging Stereotypes Mini-Unit
Sleeter and Grant Approaches
Human Relations:
Multiculturalism:
Promotes unity and acceptance
Reduces stereotyping
Activities involving cooperative learning, role plays, and affective learning.
Respect for differences
Exploring non-traditional roles
Banks Dimensions
Prejudice Reduction
Knowledge Construction
Content Standards


Reading Standards for Literature: Quote text to draw inferences; determine theme, including how characters respond to challenges; summarize text, compare two or more characters.
Speaking and Listening Standards: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions; Summarize a written text or information presented in diverse media and formats.

Cooley, R. (2003). Beyond pink and blue: 4th graders get fired up about Pottery Barn’s gender stereotypes. In L. Christensen, M. Hansen, B. Peterson, E. Schlessman, & D. Watson (Eds.),
Rethinking elementary education
(pp. 167-170). Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools.

MA Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts and Literacy
Hall, L.A., & Piazza, S.V. (2008). Critically reading texts: What students do and how teachers can help.
The Reading Teacher
, 62(1), 32-41. doi:10.1598/RT.62.1.4

Lyman, K. (2000). Girls, worms, and body image.
Rethinking Schools Online
, 14. Retrieved from http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/14_03/girl143.shtml

Describe the concepts of prejudice and discrimination
Apply both verbal and non-verbal communication skills to develop positive relationships and improve the social environment of the school.
MA Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework
Framework for Gender Discussion

Book Resources
William’s Doll
Oliver Button is a Sissy
Amazing Grace
Heather has Two Mommies

Classroom book project

“Interpreting texts through a critical literacy lens can help students become aware of the messages that texts communicate about power, race, and gender…” (Hall & Piazza, 2008, p. 32).
The authors conclude that in order to launch a successful critical literacy discussion, the teachers should select a thought provoking book, and lead the discussion in a direction that highlights both what is said and what is left unsaid in the text. The teachers should also pay close attention to the type of language that they use in the discussion, and the type of language that they teach to the students (Hall & Piazza, 2008, p. 39-40).
Lesson 1 - Introduction to Gender Stereotypes
Lesson 2 - Book Study Groups
Lesson 3 - Gender Stereotypes in Media
Creating a fact vs. stereotype list
In class simulation
Focusing on gender specific activities
"Some people think..."
"But everyone needs to know...."
"What Everyone Needs to Know"
Assessment
Formative
Summative

Students choose stereotype to address
Create two illustrations - one demonstrating stereotype and the other breaking it
Example:
Some people think every family has a mom and a dad, but everyone needs to know that each family is different.
• Compare initial/prior knowledge to final discussion/classroom book

• Discussion during literature circles

• Media posters

• Media Tally Sheets

Small group study (4-5 students)
Explore 2-3 books relating to theme:
Bullying based on non-conformance
Empowered girls
Non-conforming toys/activities
Non-conforming behaviors
Alternative Families
Present to class thru role play or poster
• Classroom Book
“X” by Lois Gould
Reflective Teaching
Lesson 4 - Classroom Book
Activate Prior Knowledge
What are stereotypes?
Expectations about boys v. girls?
Labels and Put-downs
References
Be aware of our own biases
Adapt lessons as unit progresses
Assess student knowledge and misconceptions during discussions
Example: Teacher in "Girls, Worms and Body Image"
Viewing reality from multiple perspectives
In class exploration of gender stereotypes within media
Create stereotype posters using various forms media
Data Project
Bridges, S.Y. (2002). Ruby's Wish. (S. Blackall, Illustrator). San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books.

Cooley, R. (2003). Beyond pink and blue: 4th graders get fired up about Pottery Barn’s gender stereotypes. In L. Christensen, M. Hansen, B. Peterson, E. Schlessman, & D. Watson (Eds.), Rethinking elementary education (pp. 167-170). Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools.

de Haan, L. & Nijland, S. (2000). King & King. Berkeley, CA: Tricycle Press.

dePaolo, T. (1979). Oliver Button is a Sissy. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, Inc.

Garden, N. (2004). Molly's Family. (S. Wooding, Illustrator). New York, NY: Farrar Straus and Giroux.

Hall, L.A., & Piazza, S.V. (2008). Critically reading texts: What students do and how teachers can help. The Reading Teacher, 62(1), 32-41. doi:10.1598/RT.62.1.4

Hoffman, M. (1991). Amazing Grace. (C. Binch, Illustrator). New York, NY: Dial Books for Young Readers.

Hoffman, M. (2007). Princess Grace. (C. Van Wright, & Y-H. Hu, Illustrators). New York, NY: Dial Books for Young Readers.

Hoffman, S. & Hoffman, I. (2014). Jacob's New Dress. (C. Case, Illustrator). Chicago, IL: Albert Whitman & Company.

Howe, J. (1996). Pinky and Rex and the Bully. (M. Sweet, Illustrator). New York, NY: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

Kilodavis, C. (2009). My Princess Boy. (S. DeSimone, Illustrator). New York, NY: Aladdin.

Lyman, K. (2000). Girls, worms, and body image. Rethinking Schools Online, 14. Retrieved  from http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/14_03/girl143.shtml

Mackall, D.D. (2008). A Girl Named Dan. (R. Graff, Illustrator). Chelsea, MI: Sleeping Bear Press.

Meyer, K. (2001). The Princess Knight. (K. Meyer, Illustrator). New York, NY: The Chicken House.

Munsch, R. (1980). The Paper Bag Princess. (M. Martchenko, Illustrator). New York, NY: Annick Press, Ltd.

Newman, L. (1989). Heather Has Two Mommies. (D. Souza, Illustrator). New York, NY: Alyson Books.

Smith, L. (2008). Madam President. New York, NY: Hyperion Books for Children.

Springstubb, T. (2013). Phoebe and Digger. (J. Newman, Illustrator). Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press.

Yolen, J. & Stemple, H.E.Y. (2010). Not All Princesses Dress in Pink. (A-S. Lanquetin, Illustrator). New York, NY: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Zolotow, C. (1972). William's Doll. (W. Pène Du Bois, Illustrator). New York, NY: HarperTrophy.
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