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Untitled Prezi

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by

Laura Grau

on 1 October 2013

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Transcript of Untitled Prezi

History and development of energy transition
SHIFT TO COAL
SHIFT TO NATURAL GAS
NUCLEAR ENERGY
SHIFT TO OIL
RENEWABLE ENERGIES
Middle Ages
Cities grew,
and so did the needs of energy
$
13th century
Uses
% of the energy used to produce electricity all over the world
Pollution
GHG, particulate matter, sulphur and nitrogen oxides
19th century
Steam engine
Iron industry
Ships
Trains
Firewood
Crops
Charcoal
Coal
Kerosene
Light bulb
Whale oil
Internal combustion engine
Gasoline
Model-T automobile (Henry Ford. 1908)
Oil became the fuel of choice

Energy density

Easy transport and storage

In the middle of the 20th century it overtook coal as the first worldwide source of energy
19th century
GHGs
Steel and Iron industry
Household heating
20th century
Is it safe enough?
Future free carbon-energy?
Until now the developed world used to consume two-thirds of total oil. Developing countries are increasing their energy needs, evenly distributed among them.
Currently 90% non renewal, Mainly oil, coal and natural gas
As they availability decreases its price will rise, becoming every time less worthwhile.
They spread heterogeneously along the planet so its use creates a dependence on the country that exploits them. Risk of embargo and scarcity in a political or economical conflict.
Negative effects on health and the environment, such as the climate change, the smog, the air pollution, the acid rain and the ozone depletion.
Security problems.
Why do we need an energy transition?
Solar thermal or PV
Wind
Hydropower
Biofuels
Hydrogen fuel
Cleaner
All over the planet
Inexhaustible
Challenges
They have less energy density than non renewables, so we are proposing a changing from higher energy density but generally lower-cost source to lower energy density substitutes that are generally more expensive.
They must be converted into electricity to be transported and stored: energy loss
Being renewable doesn't imply being continuous or equal in every region,
Price and energy to be processed: e.g. photovoltaic cells.
We must rely on renewable energies by:

Encouraging technological developments such as the smart grid.

Making its prices more competitive: government incentives and subsidies

What we need to do is really improve energy efficiency standards, develop in full scale renewable and alternative energy and use the one resource we have in abundance, our creativity.
Lois Capps

Laura Grau Valls
Universitat de Barcelona
10th LERU Brigh Conference. 2013
Full transcript