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My dream city!

By Hao Wang
by

Hugo Wang

on 25 November 2011

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Transcript of My dream city!

I hope one day I can be there----Uyuni,Bolivia Where it is? Salar de Uyuni Salar de Uyuni (or Salar de Tunupa) is the world's largest salt flat at 10,582 km� (4,085 square miles). It is located in the Potos� and Oruro departments in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes, 3,650 meters (11,975 feet) high. The major minerals found in the salar are halite and gypsum What do I like most of the city? thanks for listening,I hope u like it Made by Hao Wang Uyuni is a city in the southwest of Bolivia. It primarily serves as a gateway for tourists visiting! train cemetrery One of the major tourist attractions of the area is an antique train cemetery. It is located 3 km outside Uyuni and is connected to it by the old train tracks. The town served in the past as a distribution hub for the trains carrying minerals on their way to the Pacific Ocean ports. The train lines were built by British engineers who arrived near the end of the 19th century and formed a sizable community in Uyuni. The engineers were invited by British-sponsored Antofagasta and Bolivia Railway Companies, which is now Ferrocarril de Antofagasta a Bolivia. The rail construction started in 1888 and ended in 1892. It was encouraged by the then Bolivian President Aniceto Arce, who believed Bolivia would flourish with a good transport system, but it was also constantly sabotaged by the local Aymara indigenous Indians who saw it as an intrusion into their lives. The trains were mostly used by the mining companies. In the 1940s, the mining industry collapsed, partly due to the mineral depletion. Many trains were abandoned thereby producing the train cemetery. There are talks to build a museum out of the cemetery.
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