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Gerund

Presentarions about gerund
by

Jonathan Gomez

on 23 February 2013

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Transcript of Gerund

Gerunds A gerund is a specific type of word applied to English grammar. What is a Gerund? The word stems from a verbal, or a verb form, but does not act as a verb in a sentence. Though a gerund is formed from a verb and indicates an action or state of being, it acts as a noun and therefore occupies a place in a sentence where a noun normally would, such as a subject, a direct object, or an object of a preposition. How to use gerunds Gerunds can be use it as a subject,
as a verb to be complement and after prepositions. Gerund as Subject Gerund can be the subject of a sentence:

Swimming in the winter can boost your immune system.

Learning a foreign language is easier at a young age. Gerung as subject complement A gerund clause can be a subject complement after verb be:

What I really like is travelling to other countries. The gerund as the object of a verb A gerund clause can be the object of a verb:

I really enjoy swimming in the sea. Verb + gerund admit
advise
allow
anticipate
appreciate
avoid
begin
ear
can't help
can't stand
cease
consider
continue
defend forgive
hate
imagine
involve
justify
keep
like
love
mean
mention
mindmiss
need
neglect Preposition + gerund As a gerund clause serves as a noun, it can be used after prepositions:
After watching the movie, I wanted to read the book. A gerund clause can also be the object of a preposition after a verb, adjective or noun:
I am sorry for being late.
Sarah is very talented at playing the piano. When to is a preposition, it can be followed by a noun or a gerund:
I'm looking forward to our trip.
I'm looking forward to hearing from you. Verb + preposition + gerund Verbs followed by a preposition and a gerund (dis)agree with
(dis)approve of
admit to
agree with
aim at
apologize for
believe in
benefit from boast about
care for
complain about
concentrate on
confess tocope with
count on
decide against look forward to
object to
pay for
put off
put up with
rely on
resort to
specialize in succeed in
talk about/of
think about/of
vote for
worry about The gerund used in compound nouns In compound structures, a gerund is often used before a noun to modify it:

drinking water (water for drinking) delaydeny
despise
discuss
dislike
don't mind
dread
encourage
enjoy
escape
excuse
fancy
finish
forget permit
postpone
practice
prefe
prevent
propose
quit
recall
recollect
recommend
regret
remember
report
require resent
resist
risk
save
start
stopsuggest
tolerate
try
understand
urge depend on
dream about/of
feel like
get on with
get used to
give up
insist on
laugh about & Infinitive An infinitive may exist with or without the word "to".  
For example, following modal verbs (can, may, must, ... ).

Infinitives with the word "to" can function as either the SUBJECT or the OBJECT of a verb. To read a good book is my favorite form of relaxation.
To win means everything to him.
To speak a foreign language well requires practice. INFINITIVES AS THE SUBJECT OF THE SENTENCE To read a good book is my favorite form of relaxation.
To win means everything to him.
To speak a foreign language well requires practice. INFINITIVES AS THE SUBJECT OF THE SENTENCE Most people like to win.
I don't want to go.
We don't need to fight like this. INFINITIVES AS THE OBJECT OF THE VERB Here are some verbs that are followed by an infinitive.  Verb + Infinitive Here are some verbs that are followed by an infinitive. 

afford 
agree
appears
arrange
 asked 
beg 
 care 
claim
 consent 
 decided 
demand
deserves
expects
fail
hesitate Verb + Infinitive advise you 
allow me 
begged me 
asked me 
caused us 
challenged me 
convince them 
dare you 
expects you 
encouraged her 
forbid you 
forced him 
hire someone
  Verb + Pronoun/Noun + Infinitive Infinitive phrases often follow certain adjectives. When this happens, the infinitive is said to play the role of Adjective Complement. 

She was hesitant to tell the coach of her plan.
She was reluctant to tell her parents, also.
But she would not have been content to play high school ball forever. need
offered
plan
prepared
promise
pretend
seems
refuses
 had 
swear
threatened
volunteered
 wait 
want
wish afford 
agree
appears
arrange
 asked 
beg 
 care 
claim
 consent 
 decided 
demand
deserves
expects
fail
hesitate
hope
intend 
learned
managed
mean 
promise
pretend
seems
refuses
 had 
swear
threatened
volunteered
 wait 
want
wish instructed them
invited
need you 
ordered me 
permitted them
persuaded her
reminded me 
requires us
taught me 
told me 
want you 
urged me
warned me  Here is a list of adjetives that you will often
find in such constructions. THANKS!! Infinitive hope
intend 
learned
managed
mean 
need
offered
plan
prepared
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