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The Rose of The World- Unseen Poetry presentation

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Thomas Willett

on 13 February 2013

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Transcript of The Rose of The World- Unseen Poetry presentation

William Butler Yeats Rose of The World The Poem Subject Matter and Themes Subject Matter:
- Describes the Love for a woman (Maud Gonne)
- Describes the uncertainty of love

Themes:
- Shows how people can be captivated by love
- Shows how people struggle to make people
love you Rhyming Scheme
(A, B, B, A, B) - The first four lines create a sense of entrapment within the stanza, such as Yeats was captivated by Maud's beauty

- Yet the last line's rhyme produces a sense of longing and lingering; just a Yeats longed for Maud to accept his love

- In turn, this creates an almost desperate tone within the poem Use of Mythology Overall Message and Meaning Language - Yeats uses natural imagery through the use of similes
"Like the pale waters"
- This enhances the concept of love and beauty being natural and innate which should not be "[passed] by like a dream" Who dreamed that beauty passes like a dream?
For these red lips, with all their mournful pride,
Mournful that no new wonder may betide,
Troy passed away in one high funeral gleam,
And Usna's children died.

We and the labouring world are passing by:
Amid men's souls, that waver and give place
Like the pale waters in their wintry race,
Under the passing stars, foam of the sky,
Lives on this lonely face.

Bow down, archangels, in your dim abode:
Before you were, or any hearts to beat,
Weary and kind one lingered by His seat;
He made the world to be a grassy road
Before her wandering feet. "Troy passed away in one high funeral gleam,"
- Troy was the daughter of Zeus and Leda
- Maud's beauty, like Troy's can wreck turmoil between nations
- Maud is from Ireland, suggesting that her beauty embodies the strife between England and Ireland
- Suggests the power that love can have, both as a destructive and constructive force

"And Usna's children died."
- Yeats likens Maud to the Deirdre, an Irish heroine who was destined to bring suffering on the area of Ulster, because too many men fell in love with her
- Yeats uses symbolism to reflect his position. Such as the area of Ulster was destined to suffer, Yeats was too due to loving Maud. Stanza 1:
- The poet contests the idea that beauty "passes live a dream". People like himself are alert to it and become enthralled.
- Notes that beauty has caused much tragedies of human violence through the use of mythology, highlighting both the power of beauty and love

Stanza 2:
- While most of the world passes Yeats by, Maud's "lonely face" lives on
- Like water and the stars are constant, so is the memory of Maud

Stanza 3:
- Yeats suggests that angels bow down to her beauty
- The world is a grassy path, made by God, for her to venture Form and Structure Who dreamed that beauty passes like a dream?
For these red lips, with all their mournful pride,
Mournful that no new wonder may betide,
Troy passed away in one high funeral gleam,
And Usna's children died.

We and the labouring world are passing by:
Amid men's souls, that waver and give place
Like the pale waters in their wintry race,
Under the passing stars, foam of the sky,
Lives on this lonely face.

Bow down, archangels, in your dim abode:
Before you were, or any hearts to beat,
Weary and kind one lingered by His seat;
He made the world to be a grassy road
Before her wandering feet. - The Poem has aspects of classicism, which holds the principles and ideals of beauty that are characteristic of Greek and Roman art, architecture, and literature. - It is composed of three stanzas, all of five lines each
- This continuity throughout the structure may reflect upon the poets continuous feels towards Maud. - The multiple caesura within the poem creates a reflective tone.
- It's as if the poet is contemplating Maud all the way through - The rhetorical question at the beginning of the poem creates a conversational tone
- As well as giving the impression that the poet is thinking - Yeats uses Anthropomorphism
"pale waters in their wintry race"
- Highlights the forces of nature
- He may be attempting to justify his fixation with Maud, by suggesting how nature e.g. her beauty, is a powerful enough force to consume him
Thank you for watching
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