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Interprofessional practice

Interprofessional practice teaching students with complex needs
by

Shona Woods

on 18 November 2013

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Transcript of Interprofessional practice

How can I
improve
Competence
in
assessment
and
assistive technology ?
photo (cc) Malte Sörensen @ flickr
Inclusive Education
Conclusion
Extent
References
Two sides
Beneficial
Detrimental
Factors
Reality
Teacher to pupil ratio
Curriculum
Perception vs. Reality
Support available
Politics
Time
Assessment
Tension
Activity
For
Against
Form two groups
'Specialized schools are to be closed down, all staff and pupils are to be integrated into the mainstream system'
Consider;
Staff - SEN Pupil ratio
Accessibility
Feelings of children
Feelings of staff
Children diagnosed with SEN
More knowledge ?
Easier to identify ?
Broader understanding ?
SEN children in mainstream education
Children in specialized education
Consistency with findings
(Scottish Executive, 2006)
Specialized Schools
However
why ?
Separation of large SEN schools
Statistics can be faulty
SEN schools attached to Mainstream
Smaller specialized units
Pupils not counted
(Peltier, 1997)
ALL students
Enhances Social Growth
No negative academic affects on no SEN pupils
Teacher pupil engagement not affected by severe SEN's
Alternative
Make curriculum accessible to all
Education (Disability Strategies and Pupil's Educational Records) (Scotland) Act 2002
How ?
Local Authorities
HAVE
to do this
Diversity across the authorities
Edinburgh
Glasgow
Higher numbers of specialized schools
and
Allan, J. (2008). Inclusion for All? In T. Bryce, & W. Humes, Scottish Education. Third Edition. Beyond
Devolution (pp. 701-710). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Campbell, C., Gillborn, D., Lunt, I., Sammons, P., Vincent, C., Warren, S., . . . Robertson, P. (2001). Interchange 66:
Developments in Inclusive Schooling. Scottish Executive Education Departmen

Department for Education and Science (1978) Special Educational Needs (The Warnock Report), London: HMSO

Frederickson, N. et al. (2007). Assessing the social and affective outcomes of inclusion. British Journal of Special
Education, 34(2), 105-115.

Munn, P. et al. (2000) Exclusion from school: A view from Scotland of some policy and practice dilemmas at http://www.scottishaffairs.org/backiss/pdfs/sa30/SA30_Munn_Cullen_Johnstone_and_Lloyd.pdf (Last accessed 04/03/2013)

Peltier, Gary L. (1997) Effect of inclusion on non disabled children in Contmeporary Education, (68) pp. 234 - 238.

PINS. 2012 Pupil Inclusion Network Scotland Exclusions in Scotland’s schools: one year on, where are we now? At http://www.pinscotland.org/assets/main-pdfs/PINS-Exclusions-Seminars-Report-2012.pdf (Last Accessed 03/04/2013)

Riddell, S. (2006) Special Educational Needs: Providing Additional Support in Policy and Practice in Education, (5) pp. 40-57

Scottish Government. (2008). Getting it Right for Every Child. Retrieved at
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/People/Young-People/gettingitright (Last Accessed 04/03/2013
5 - 14 vs. CfE

Confusing Concept?

Integration
-

Assimilation

Inclusion
-

Transformation
Booth (2000) p44
“Matching the resources
we have to the learning
styles and educational
needs of the students”
Tomlinson (1997) p44

Are Scottish schools becoming more inclusive?

Special Educational Needs: Providing
Additional Support
Defining and Measuring Inclusion.

Sheila Riddell
Riddell, S. (2006) "Special Educational Needs: Providing Additional Support" Policy and Practice in Education, Volume 5.

The key questions we aim to address this seminar:

1) Is inclusive education affected by political influences, if so how and why ?

2) Are children without Special Educational Needs (SEN) affected in a positive or negative way within the system of inclusive education ?

3) Would the needs of SEN children be better addressed in specialised schools?

After watching the video about Morgan and her experience with inclusion, do you think this would be the experience of many other children with special educational needs? Why or why not?

We encourage you to share any experiences you have had, good and bad that relate to inclusion
Activity


A short documentary on Morgan Warren, a girl with 11Q Syndrome, and her inclusion experience at a primary school
•Development of inclusive educational polices

•Issues affecting progress

•The growing spectrum of ASD

•Mainstream and specialist units

•Tensions surrounding inclusion
Integration
Locational:
Children with SEN educated
in school although on another site.

Social:
Similar to locational however a
greater importance to the children having
more contact with others during for example
lunch time, play time etc.

Functional:
Where the child spends his/
her whole tome in class and follows
the same curriculum, with
added support though.
Integration
“the parent of the pupil refuses to comply or to allow the pupil to comply with the
rules, regulations or disciplinary requirements of the school “
AND
“that they consider that in all the circumstances to allow the pupil to continue his/her attendance at the school would be likely to be seriously detrimental to order and discipline in the school or to the educational well-being of pupils there”
Alternatives to
Exclusion
(Munn et al, 2011)
A greater proportion of
children with additional
support needs are now being
mainstreamed
(
not attending special schools
).
1 in 3
are not always in
mainstream
classes
BUT
The figures show
that there are
99 952

children who receive
free school meals
10 397
of these children are known to have a
special need of some form
only
971
children are both recognised as
having a special need and being looked
after by the state
Social Class and
Social class
Gender
Boys are more likely than girls to be
identified as having additional support needs, excluded from school, and placed in special
schools or units.
In 2005, 70% of pupils with additional
support needs, 68% of pupils
attending special schools and 79%
of those excluded
from schools were male.
There is a growing opinion
in both Scotland and England that inclusion has “gone too far” and that there is more of a need to have additional support for the children with
emotional and behavioral
difficulties
AND...
“There is a growing recognition that the policy
of inclusion is not working for many
pupils who exhibit violent
behaviour.
Do you Agree?
What does 'inclusion' mean to you?
Discussion
Interprofessional evidence
Inclusion?
and Exclusion
Gender
a detailed definition of inclusion

methods of assessing inclusion

The tensions involved in regards to mainstream and specialist schools
We hope to have provided you with:
However we would be happy to answer any questions on the matter incase we didn't
Social Creatures
(Frederickson, 2007)
Better Behaviour/
Better Learning

Discipline Task Force

Getting it Right for Every Child
(Scottish Government, 2008)

Curriculum for Excellence
(Campbell, C et al 2001)
Further Policies
Professional Practice
Contextual practice
Ethical practice
Reflective practice
Cultural responsiveness and effective practice
Professional learning and identity
Contextual practise
References

Ko te tamaiti te putake o te kaupapa
The child is the heart of the matter.
Thinking!
Evidence-Based Practice

Legislation
Who ?

This Prezi was produced and
presented by
Sheridan Wood
Shona Woods
Tracey Herewini-Davis &
Heather McGuire,

How can I improve competence as an
Ethical & Reflective practitioner ?
Domain 1
Domain 5
Interprofessional & Evidence
based practice
Domain 2
Cultural Responsiveness &
effective practice

How can I improve my
competence in contextualising
my practice ?
How can I improve competence
as an interprofessional & evidence
based practitioner ?

Wellness
Digital literacy
Communities of practice
Specialist Teaching
Professional Development
Knowledge
Treaty of Waitangi
Interprofessional
Practice

Teaching students with
complex needs
Domain 1
Professional learning & Identity
Knowing what action to take....
2013
A specialist teacher
in
complex needs

Assistive technology
Evidence of successful
learning
Community of Practice
Learning support
Students'choice of subjects
Presuming competence
Consistency
Tolerance, patience, acceptance
Positive leadership......
Abolish national standards
Greater use of
expanded
curriculum
greater training
for teachers in
complex needs
more pathways
for student
leadership and
opportunities while
at school
"Healthier
attitudes
towards
inclusion..".
Reflection needs to bring about voice....
voice needs to bring about change......
unreasonable expectations
isolation
Physical barriers
learning with,
from
and about each other
What is
Interprofessional practice ?
Challenges
Working in partnership
with student and family
Respecting cultural differences
Understanding how,what,why.....
Reflect frequently.....
why ?
How ?
Domain 4
Contextual practice
the benefits.......
NZ Disability strategy
NZ Education Act
UN Convention on rights of persons with disabilities
National Curriculum
Human Rights act
Professional code of ethics
Service Standards
School Charter
Knowledge of the Ethical Response Cycle
guides professional ethical practice......
I need to know my learner....

I need sound Special Education Pedagogy !
I need to know what is best for the child and family
Emphasis on working with the child in their classroom- Not Withdrawing them....
Educators working with students with complex needs draw from a range of theorists...
..
Vygotsky
Bronfenbrenner
Piaget
Erikson
Bandura
Skinner
However Vygotsky appeals the most......
with his theory on the zone of proximal development........
(Pschosocial development)
Challenges...
Language
The Dominant Culture setting
Different beliefs and values
Knowledge and understanding of why and how


All students have
value in our society...
All students can learn...
Respect for student dignity
"what we say we do (Espoused theory) and what we actually do (theory in use) can be completely different....
Argyris & Schon
Schon's reflection in and on action....
"thinking on your feet is reflecting "in action..".
Reflecting after the event is "on action"
Inclusion needs to be looked at to determine what is best for the child....
Input from child & family
High quality research
evidence
Experienced & expertise
of the practitioner
The aim is to provide an inclusive educational context where every child is a lifelong learner.....
Best practice in assessment
looks like.....
Every student is unique and needs to be supplied with assistive technology that matches their cognitive and communicative needs.





"Narrative assessment is learner centred, credit based, and illustrates learning and achievement within authentic contexts" (Moore, Molloy, Morton and Davis 2008, p.1)
Hey, now I know interprofessional practice
means learning with, from and about each other!

...are stepping stones informing practitioners
what the next steps could be...

Domain 3
Ethical & Reflective Practice
Domain 6
Professional Practice
Teaching students with complex needs requires frequent and constant reflection..... action........reflection......action....
Reflection informs planning.....
...planning the next steps...
Who ?
Our
understanding of
roles
Working collaboratively to build individual strengths to empower the whole team...
Partnership: Family/Teacher

Participation

Protection
....of the child
Narrative assessments
How do I improve competence in assessment and assistive technology ?
Assessment outcomes....
I am competent
at keeping up with
my professional identity
keeping myself well
and participating in
communities of practice

I am a competent ethical
&
reflective practitioner
I am competent
at contextualising
my practise
I am competent in assessment

I am a competent interprofessional
and evidence based practitioner....
I am a culturally responsive
practitioner... I understand
relationships and respect
are vital to my practice....

(
Cognitive theory
)
(Ecological systems theory
)
(Social learning theory)
(Operant conditioning theory)
(Social development theory)
"ethics is concerned with the moral choices we make,the values that inform these choices,the reasons we provide,and the language we use....." O'Neill (2007)
"Assistive technology
represents one of the most
expanding and promising
strategies....."
(Mitchell, 2008, p.213.)
Facilitates
access to
the
curriculum....
Effective assessment is an everyday practice that involves noticing,recognising and responding to children's learning.
(Te Whariki)
"Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is best understood as an ongoing process that arises out of the interaction
between teaching and learning." (NZ Curriculum, 2007, p.39)

I am now a competent
practitioner
I am a
competent
life long
learner......
and I work competently within
an interprofessional
team.
Collaborative practice
Domain 1
Journey of Professional learning



Domain 2
Cultural responsiveness
With special thanks to all those interviewed....!
Full transcript